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NEWS
March 25, 2013
Baltimore City Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is trying to craft a budget that will trim expenses and property taxes to encourage an increase to the population ("First step to a better Baltimore," March 21). Reducing excessive city employees is a good first step. The big payoff would come from reexamining things the city does that are not done by competing, lower-tax suburbs. The mayor should engage an expert like former county executives Jim Smith of Baltimore County or Doug Duncan of Montgomery County to analyze things the city started doing when it was the largest, wealthiest jurisdiction, many of which enhance suburbanites' quality of life, that are no longer essential or affordable, and use the potential savings to help the city approach suburban tax rates.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Baltimore's school board is scheduled to vote Tuesday on a $1.3 billion budget that has drawn backlash from schools and lawmakers for its program cuts, and has led the board to consider overhauling a local funding formula that left some high schools with as much as $450,000 in cuts. The proposed budget - which shows dwindling financial support for two high-profile programs for gifted students, Ingenuity Project and International Baccalaureate - has spurred petitions, political outcry and a citywide debate about the investment in advanced students.
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NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | March 27, 2010
One-third of children and teenagers who attend rec center activities will be shut out of programs under the gloomy budget scenario unveiled by Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake's administration, the head of recreation and parks said Friday. More than half of the city's recreation centers would be closed down, and funding for 13 neighborhood swimming and wading pools would dry up under the preliminary spending plan drafted by the city's Finance Department. The budget - which calls for layoffs of more than 600 workers and deep cuts to fire and police - has provoked outcry from residents, city workers and agency heads.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
City school officials facing a $31 million budget shortfall next year have proposed dipping into the system's rainy day fund to close the gap. But that's not what those dollars are supposed to be for. The whole point of setting aside emergency funds is to cushion the impact of major unanticipated disruptions, from natural disasters to sudden economic crises. They're not a backstop for the kind of foreseeable, year-to-year budgetary ups and downs that ought to be part of the routine planning process, and using them that way would set a terrible precedent for the future.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2011
Baltimore's top financial officer and longtime budget writer said Monday he will retire from city government, the first Cabinet-level departure since Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake won the Democratic primary this month. Though not a household name, Edward J. Gallagher has been a behind-the-scenes force in shaping every Baltimore spending plan since he was hired in 1983. The city's finance director since 2005, he plans to remain in the job until the mayor's office completes a national search for a replacement.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2011
City Council members voted Monday to approve the $1.3 billion budget proposed by Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, but a key committee postponed a decisive vote until Wednesday. The spending plan for the fiscal year that begins July 1 would increase the operating budget by 1 percent while cutting $65 million in expenses to close a shortfall. The council has the authority to cut the proposal, but may not increase spending. While the plan was approved by the full 15-member council meeting as the committee of the whole, it did not receive the necessary support from the five-member budget and appropriations committee, according to a spokesman for Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young.
NEWS
April 15, 1993
When the Board of Estimates received the Schmok administration's proposal for a $2.072 billion budget yesterday, the following exchange took place between City Council President Mary Pat Clarke and Comptroller Jacqueline F. McLean.MPC: "The recession is officially over."JFM: "Who said so?"MPC: "The budget did."JFM: "No, it isn't, either."The local and national economy are sure to have many bumps ahead but the city budget proposal assumes smooth going for the municipal government. It expects public services to be continued without major cuts.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | June 3, 2009
The water main breaks that closed major Baltimore streets and disrupted rail service in April also washed away sizable chunks the city's budget. Fixing the 20-inch main that ruptured at Gay and Lombard streets on April 28 cost $222,523, according to figures from the city's finance department. That does not include thousands of dollars in police and fire overtime, or the lost work of city employees sent home because there was no water service in their buildings. The city spent $69,258 to repair another water main break the next day, when a 36-inch pipe burst in Halethorpe and delayed Amtrak service on the eastern seaboard.
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | June 11, 1991
It was hot and uncomfortable for members of the Baltimore City Council last night. They sat high on a podium in the sweltering War Memorial, staring into the glare of television lights and listening as taxpayers from across the city told them the council taxes too much because it spends too much."
NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | April 24, 1991
Annapolis will get a parking garage off West Street and a new pool at Truxtun Park under the 1992 capital budget approved by the City Council Monday night.The budget includes $9.7 million in improvements and projects for fiscal 1992, which begins July 1. The city will raise $5.8 million by selling bonds. About $3.9 million will come from the state, federal government and local sources.The city will break ground this fall on the long-awaited Gotts Court parking garage. The $6.14 million garage will be built behind theArundel Center on Calvert Street.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
A slowdown in revenue has Baltimore school officials scrambling for budget adjustments that won't require the system to raid its rainy-day fund or cut central office positions and school programs. Officials face a $31 million deficit in next year's budget, due to factors that include a dried up stream of grant funding, fluctuating financial commitments and a halt to rapid growth in enrollment. Now, the school board has asked administrators to come up with alternatives to their proposed budget reductions, which included staff layoffs, breaking contracts and cutbacks to summer school.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
Stepping up to a broad circular table of men and women all busy crunching numbers to balance Baltimore's budget, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake smiled. "Y'all look like you're hard at work," she said. "Well," replied Linda Moyd, a 55-year-old activist in the city's Gilmor neighborhood, "we've got to get this budget right. " Like others at the "Balanced Baltimore" citizen workshop in East Baltimore on Saturday, Moyd seemed fully engaged in the task at hand — closing a projected $20 million shortfall in 2015 while protecting the services she values.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
Baltimore's budget director said Tuesday he's applied for a vacant seat on the Montgomery County Council - and will resign his position here if he is named to the council. Andrew W. Kleine, 44, of Silver Spring, is among the applicants seeking to fill Councilwoman Valerie Ervin's seat, who resigned on Jan. 3 to take a job at a nonprofit. “The opportunity was totally unexpected,” Kleine said. “As a lifelong public servant and longtime community leader, I could not pass up this exciting chance to serve in a new way. If I am selected, I would resign my position with the city to focus full-time on council business.
NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | December 18, 2013
Two weeks ago I noted that Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's advocacy on behalf of the farm bill working its way through Congress proved that she was just more of the same of the failed leadership that Baltimore has been subjected to over the years.  The latest stunt, as reported by WBAL-TV , re-emphasizes that point: "Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is looking for city residents to give input on how they think the city can...
NEWS
December 2, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's op-ed piece from Friday is an example of why nothing ever seems to change in Baltimore.   Mayor Rawlings-Blake writes primarily about the Congressional farm bill and the impact that it will have on the city of Baltimore. She writes: "Baltimore City, like many other cities around the country, is dependent on a comprehensive, multi-year farm bill that addresses the current needs of local farmers, low-income residents and consumers who want access to  healthy foods  grown nearby.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Six months after Baltimore pulled its speed and red light cameras offline because of mistakes, officials say the city's vendor still isn't ready to begin issuing tickets — and no one can say when the program will resume. The city counts on the cameras both to enforce safe-driving laws and to generate millions of dollars in revenue. The continued delay and uncertainty are causing some to question whether Baltimore's new vendor, Brekford Corp. of Anne Arundel County, is up to the task.
NEWS
January 20, 1999
Westminster officials intend to have a draft of the city's 1999-2000 budget ready for public meetings in April and May.The tentative schedule includes a meeting April 5 to review a draft of the proposal, a completed proposal April 12, and a work session with elected officials and staff April 19.A tax rate ordinance would be introduced during a Common Council meeting April 26. A public hearing on the tax rate and budget would be held May 3, and the budget...
NEWS
April 29, 2013
Baltimore City school officials say the nearly $1.2 billion budget the system unveiled last week will fund a raft of new academic endeavors, among them a new team to upgrade instruction in the sciences to meet the higher standards of the new national "core" curriculum and additional programs for academically gifted students. This is all to the good if it helps the city attract and retain more young families with children for whom strong public schools are often the most important factor in choosing where to live.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2013
Baltimore school officials unveiled a $1.174 billion budget plan Tuesday, which they said focuses on academics with a new science team to implement curriculum, programs for advanced students and a shifting of staff in the central office. Enrollment is projected to increase in traditional schools by about 2,500 students, causing per-pupil funding to decrease by $40 from last year to $5,190. The annual amount could change if the system doesn't see the projected increase in students.
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