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By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
Meeting behind closed doors, the city's Board of Finance on Monday approved more than $100 million in taxpayer assistance to help fund a massive, waterfront development project that will host energy giant Exelon Corp.'s regional headquarters. After barring the public from the 90-minute meeting, board members voted 4-0 to approve a developer's request for $107 million in tax increment financing to pay for roads, utilities and parks for the $1 billion Harbor Point mixed-use development on the waterfront between Harbor East and Fells Point, according to Stephen M. Kraus, the city's chief of treasury management.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Walter Evan Black Jr., a retired chief judge of the U.S. District Court for Maryland who ruled against the city of Baltimore in its efforts to acquire the Colts after the team moved to Indianapolis, died of complications from Parkinson's disease Monday at his Easton home. The former Roland Park-area resident was 88. During a lengthy career, he ruled against Baltimore in 1985 when it attempted to acquire the Colts football franchise by condemnation. In his ruling, he said the city did not have the power to take the franchise because the team had moved on the night of March 29, 1984, before the day the city had filed its suit.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | June 17, 1995
The Court of Appeals yesterday ruled that the Baltimore Board of Elections acted properly when it refused to carry out an order by the state elections board to remove more than 32,000 names from the city's voter registration rolls.The court upheld a decision by Baltimore Circuit Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan, who ruled that changes in state laws nullified the state elections board's March 29 order to purge voters who had failed to vote in the past five years.The lawyer for the Baltimore elections board said the ruling -- a one-sentence order issued a day after oral arguments -- clears the way for a smooth city election Sept.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Robert L. Karwacki, a retired Maryland Court of Appeals judge who was president of the Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners during the troubled early 1970s, died of kidney failure Monday at his Chester home. The former Mount Vernon resident was 80. He was named head of the city's school board in 1970 and assisted in the appointment of Baltimore's first African-American schools superintendent. "Brown v. the Board was years earlier; Bob was a master in maintaining educational stability," said former Baltimore Mayor Thomas J. D'Alesandro III, who named him to the school post.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 15, 2004
A city police officer who was accused of sleeping on the job is expected to receive $75,000 in back pay from the city, which fired him more than two years ago but later rehired him under court order. Police officials said they found officer Daniel Redd asleep about 11 a.m. Oct. 2, 2001, at the reservoir at Druid Hill Park, where he was supposed to be on anti-terrorist duty. Redd, who joined the force in 1994, was fired in June 2002 over the incident. Redd sued over his termination. In July, Baltimore Circuit Judge Robert I.H. Hammerman ordered him reinstated and reimbursed for lost wages.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
The National Aquarium in Baltimore will pay $1 a year to rent a half-acre city park under a 25-year deal approved yesterday by the city Board of Estimates. The parkland, just west of the aquarium on Pratt Street, was until recently little more than a dirt lot with a Mark di Suvero sculpture on it, said M.J. "Jay" Brodie, president of the Baltimore Development Corp., the quasi-public agency that brought the matter before the board. The aquarium has installed sod and a sprinkler system in anticipation of the deal.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | October 7, 2009
A powerful Baltimore City spending board is set to restart the bidding on two huge public works contracts, a move that some competitors say unfairly benefits an influential construction company based in the city. Whiting-Turner Contracting Co. had hoped to secure both water-facility contracts, one for $39 million and another for $115 million. But the company included Doracon Contracting as a minority-owned subcontractor. The smaller firm is in arrears on its state taxes and has allowed its charter to lapse.
NEWS
By Edward L. Heard Jr. and Edward L. Heard Jr.,Evening Sun Staff | June 7, 1991
Medical Waste Associates' decision to use its $26 million incinerator to burn out-of-state wastes without city authorization may result in a courtroom showdown to decide whether the Hawkins Point facility will be shut down.The city Board of Municipal and Zoning Appeals recommended Wednesday that the incinerator be closed, but Medical Waste Associates will probably appeal the decision to the Baltimore Circuit Court and ask that it be allowed to operate at full capacity without current city restrictions.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2000
Merchants who will be affected by Baltimore's much-heralded West Side redevelopment project got a boost yesterday, when the city Board of Estimates approved a $2 million revolving loan fund they can use to help re-establish their businesses. City officials have been planning to establish the fund for several months. The board gave its unanimous approval with the understanding that the project's developers, West Side Renaissance Inc., will repay the city. M. J. "Jay" Brodie, director of the Baltimore Development Corp.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | August 30, 2006
Thrust into a political battle over control of public education in Baltimore, the state school board followed a request by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and voted yesterday to reopen a search for city school board members. Ehrlich and his gubernatorial rival, Mayor Martin O'Malley, appoint the city board jointly, selecting from a list of candidates vetted by the state board. This month, Ehrlich refused to reappoint three members whose terms have expired, including the chairman, Brian D. Morris, an O'Malley ally.
NEWS
By M.E. Tobin | June 9, 2014
The city is paying for a series of temporary murals to be painted across vacant buildings throughout Baltimore - a momentary beautification effort that will last only until the former homes are town down. The "Love Letters to Baltimore" project by artist Stephen Powers (which so far consists of the words "Forever together" and "I am here because it's home" in giant letters along the fronts of row homes on East Eager Street and the side of a building on North Milton, respectively)
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
The Baltimore school board voted Tuesday to fully fund programs for gifted students, which were originally slated for cuts next year, and to tap its rainy-day fund to avoid layoffs and cuts to central office operations. The board voted 7-2 to adopt the $1.3 billion budget, which restores more than $30,000 in funding cuts to the International Baccalaureate programs at City College and the Mount Washington School. The system will also maintain the same amount of funding as last year for another gifted program, the Ingenuity Project, which has seen reduced financing from the district in recent years and still cannot accommodate the number of students eligible for the program.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
Baltimore's liquor board commissioners said Wednesday they've hired an experienced administrator to run the troubled agency. Michelle Bailey-Hedgepeth, the town administrator of Capitol Heights in Prince George's County, will become the first woman to head Baltimore's liquor board in its 80-year history, commissioners said. Bailey-Hedgepeth is scheduled to start work as the agency's executive secretary, as the position is known, by June 1. She replaces Samuel T. Daniels Jr., the board's longtime executive secretary, who announced his retirement last year.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
City school officials facing a $31 million budget shortfall next year have proposed dipping into the system's rainy day fund to close the gap. But that's not what those dollars are supposed to be for. The whole point of setting aside emergency funds is to cushion the impact of major unanticipated disruptions, from natural disasters to sudden economic crises. They're not a backstop for the kind of foreseeable, year-to-year budgetary ups and downs that ought to be part of the routine planning process, and using them that way would set a terrible precedent for the future.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 9, 2014
The Baltimore City Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation on Tuesday approved a developer's exterior renovation plans for the conversion of an historic former home for unwed mothers into apartments. CHAP voted 6-1 to approve staff recommendations endorsing the renovation of the mansion, the old Florence Crittenton Home for Girls at 3110 Crittenton Place in Hampden. Developer John Brooks wants to convert the house into 14 apartments, plus one in a nearby cottage.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
A veteran Baltimore city educator has been appointed to serve as a commissioner on the city school board. Linda M. Chinnia, who served for a total of 38 years in the city school system before stepping down as its chief academic officer in 2007 when former schools CEO Andres Alonso arrived, was jointly appointed by Gov. Martin O'Malley and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. Her term begins immediately, according to an announcement from the governor's office. "I am confident that she possesses the skill and leadership necessary to ensure that every child in Baltimore City receives the high-quality public education they deserve," O'Malley said inĀ  a statement.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2000
The Board of Estimates agreed yesterday to nearly triple the rate Baltimore charges companies that use the city's conduits, a move that will bring in about $4 million to maintain and expand the city's system. The board's resolution raises the conduit fee to 58 cents per linear foot, up from the current rate of 21 cents. The rate increase is retroactive to July 1 and covers fiscal year that runs until June 30. City officials hope to raise the rate an additional 58 cents for the next fiscal year.
NEWS
By DOUG DONOVAN and DOUG DONOVAN,SUN REPORTER | February 22, 2006
The city's Board of Ethics met last night in closed session, with possible ethical lapses by City Council President Sheila Dixon expected to be on its agenda. The five-member board met for less than 90 minutes, and its chairman, Robert L. Bogomolny, declined afterward to reveal any specifics of the discussions. In a statement after the meeting, Bogomolny, president of the University of Baltimore, said the city's ethics code precludes the panel from discussing any pending matters regarding city officials, noting the confidential nature of the process.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
The chairman of the Baltimore City liquor board will step down from his post to take a position on the Orphans' Court. Stephan Fogleman, who was confirmed Friday by the Maryland State Senate, expects to be sworn in as a judge within the next 30 days. He will serve the remainder of the term and plans to run in the June primary for the next four-year term. Fogleman said he wants to make the experience for families that come before the probate court as smooth as possible, saying "It can be a very difficult time for families.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
The Baltimore school board is considering a more than 20 percent tuition increase next year for students who are not residents, which would make the city's rates higher than Baltimore County's and competitive with some Catholic programs. Officials have proposed raising tuition for middle and high school students to $7,500. Elementary-age students would pay $7,000. Currently, the district charges $5,900 for middle/high school tuition and $5,670 for elementary tuition. School officials said the increase would make its tuition rates, currently among the lowest in the state, more competitive.
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