Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCity Agencies
IN THE NEWS

City Agencies

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 28, 2012
When are voters in Baltimore city going to clean house ("Council rejects bill seeking more audits of city agencies," June 26)? How can a organization know how they are doing if it doesn't conduct regular audits? Here is another example of public employees that do not want any accountability for their actions or how they spend taxpayer dollars. The longer these public employees stay on the job, the more they become entitled and think they are above the rules. Joe Heming
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Luke Broadwater, Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
The new head of the city liquor board has a message for Baltimore's sometimes out-of-control bar scene: The party's over. In its first three months of action, a revamped liquor board — chaired by Thomas Ward, a tough-talking, 87-year-old former judge — already has found nearly 120 bars and liquor stores guilty of violations, significantly more than the previous board did in all of fiscal 2014. Ward's board has closed or revoked eight licenses, as many as in all of the last fiscal year.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 12, 2012
Most Baltimoreans would probably be surprised by the political wrangling in the City Council over a charter amendment requiring periodic audits of city agencies ("Bill to put ads on city fire trucks advances," May 31). They would probably be even more surprised by Councilwoman Helen Holton's assertion that some agencies haven't been audited in 40 years. But there's nothing at all surprising about MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blake's assurances that everything is fine and that no changes to the audit procedure are needed.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake plans to unveil dozens of recommendations Wednesday intended to lure immigrant families to Baltimore and retain them. The proposals, from increasing the availability of translators at city agencies to making it easier for the undocumented to buy homes, offer insight into the mayor's pledge to attract 10,000 new families over the next decade - an effort that is focused in part on the city's burgeoning immigrant neighborhoods. "I want to make sure that Baltimore isn't behind the curve on this trend," said Rawlings-Blake, who will formally announce the recommendations today.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | March 23, 2010
Citing numerous examples of waste and mismanagement, a citizens group appointed to analyze city services recommended that Baltimore study privatizing trash collection, create a program to quickly dispose of vacant houses and consider extracting property taxes from nonprofits such as hospitals and schools. The 150-member transition committee, selected by Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake to advise her as she took the reins of city government, blasts the Department of Housing and Community Development in particular, saying it "appears to lack a clear and coherent vision for revitalizing ... neighborhoods."
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
Baltimore officials are bracing for the potential of another round of deep budget cuts, as they draw up early spending plans to address a "significant" shortfall next year. City agency heads confirmed Thursday they were instructed to pare 5 percent of their spending as they craft preliminary budget proposals for the fiscal year beginning July 1. The mayor's press secretary stressed that the administration was in the "very early stages of the budget process," and said agencies would be asked to draft proposals for other financial scenarios as well.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | March 19, 2010
Baltimore Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake plans to merge several city agencies, abolishing as many as 15 positions and saving up to $1.5 million, The Baltimore Sun has learned. Under the plan, the Commission on Aging would be folded into the Health Department, while the community relations, wage and disabilities commissions would be consolidated under a new Office of Civil Rights, according to a senior official who spoke anonymously because he was not authorized to publicly discuss the changes.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2012
The Baltimore City Council defeated legislation Monday aimed at requiring city agencies to be audited at least once every two years. The council voted 8-7 against the measure sponsored by Councilman Carl Stokes, who appeared disheartened by the outcome. "I'm almost too stunned to speak," Stokes said. "The young people, fire, police, citizens in general, they're asking me, 'You don't care enough to show us how you're spending the money we're entrusting to you? You won't be transparent?
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
It's taken about three years of wrangling, but Baltimore's Department of Recreation and Parks has finally turned over a year of its financial books to city auditors. "I'm not jumping up and down yet," Councilman Carl Stokes, who chairs the council's finance committee, said Wednesday. "We don't know what shape the records are in. But we're pleased that after three years we do have a turnover of books. " Comptroller Joan M. Pratt said auditors are going through the department's financial records to determine whether they are detailed enough to be audited.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will sign a pact with several leading universities and hospitals Wednesday to work together on some of the city's most vexing challenges, officials said. The Baltimore City Anchor Plan calls on city agencies and the local institutions to discuss how they can share goals and resources to address public safety, business and the quality of life in the city. Set to sign the pact are the leaders of the Johns Hopkins University, Bon Secours Hospital, Coppin State University, Loyola University Maryland, the Maryland Institute College of Art , Morgan State University, Notre Dame of Maryland University and the University of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will use $52 million from a state grant to bolster Baltimore's energy conservation efforts, including improving education and outreach efforts. The goal of the Baltimore Energy Initiative, announced this week by the mayor's office, is to reduce energy use in the city and promote local investment. Money from the initiative will give some city residents free in-home installation of programmable thermostats, pipe wraps and other energy and water conservation equipment.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Baltimore residents are asked to participate in a survey measuring qualify of life issues in the city, online and by phone through Sept. 29, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced Tuesday. The Citizens Survey, which has been conducted since 2009, serves as a report card for the city, Rawlings-Blake said. City agencies use the data to write their budget proposals and gauge their performance. The mayor urged residents to participate. "It is imperative that we have a clear understanding of what issues are impacting our communities," Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will sign a pact with several leading universities and hospitals Wednesday to work together on some of the city's most vexing challenges, officials said. The Baltimore City Anchor Plan calls on city agencies and the local institutions to discuss how they can share goals and resources to address public safety, business and the quality of life in the city. Set to sign the pact are the leaders of the Johns Hopkins University, Bon Secours Hospital, Coppin State University, Loyola University Maryland, the Maryland Institute College of Art , Morgan State University, Notre Dame of Maryland University and the University of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
One week after the collapse of a large retaining wall between CSX Transportation railroad tracks and East 26th Street in Charles Village, city officials said they still had not determined who was responsible for the wall or who will pay the cost to repair it. Officials said they are still poring over decades of documents, including a 1998 agreement between the city and CSX showing that, at least once in the past, they cooperated to repair retaining...
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
To better account for hundreds of millions of grant dollars, Baltimore finance officials have a plan to overhaul city policies, train staff and keep records in a centralized database. Harry E. Black, the city's finance director, said the project should take about a year to complete and cost between $300,000 and $500,000. The city also has hired a grants coordinator to oversee the money, which accounted for about 13 percent of the budget last year, or $332 million. "Whatever we receive, we want to make certain it's aligned with the city's priorities and goals and that we are managing this process and the funds … in the most efficient and effective way," Black said.
NEWS
March 22, 2014
Who in local and state government is in charge of watching and controlling how our tax dollars are spent ( "Pratt, Young object to plan to hire outside auditors for city agencies," March 20)? We know that Gov. Martin O'Malley wasted over $200 million on a health care exchange that does not work. We have seen public employees in Baltimore being paid the wrong salary for years. When are Maryland voters going to demand accountability from government employees like the private sector does?
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | December 5, 2006
The leaders of some city agencies are pushing to significantly restrict legislation that would require developers to include affordable units in all Baltimore residential projects, but the City Council sponsors of the bill are sticking by their original plan. Members of a politically connected coalition of religious groups, urban advocacy organizations and unions who have been pushing for affordable housing reform had strong words - and blunt threats - yesterday for those who might want to weaken the initiative.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
Following a scathing audit that revealed widespread mismanagement and spotty enforcement by Baltimore's liquor board, state lawmakers are poised to approve emergency changes to reshape the troubled agency. Bills that advocates say would reform the liquor board — requiring that all records be posted online and granting the city government more control — passed the House of Delegates Monday and garnered initial approval in the Senate on Tuesday. "This would be the largest overhaul of Baltimore City's liquor board since Prohibition," said Sen. Bill Ferguson, a Baltimore Democrat who was one of five state lawmakers who helped craft the bills in response to last year's audit.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.