Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCitronelle
IN THE NEWS

Citronelle

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | June 6, 1993
Citronelle, Latham Hotel, 612 Cathedral St., (410) 727-7101. Open Mondays to Fridays for lunch, Mondays to Saturdays for dinner, Sundays for brunch only. Major credit cards. No-smoking Aarea: yes. Wheelchair accessible: yes. Prices: appetizers, $7.50- $12; entrees, $19-$26.50.Few restaurant openings in Baltimore have been as eagerly awaited as Citronelle's. The luxurious Conservatory, in what was the Peabody Court Hotel (now the Latham), was a hard act to follow. But if anyone could do it, it would be Michel Richard.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | December 28, 1995
Citronelle is closingWhatever I might have guessed would happen to Citronelle when the Latham Hotel became the Clarion, it wasn't this: One of the city's most important restaurants is closing, and the hotel is opening a food court downstairs.The entire rooftop space is being renovated; where Citronelle was, the hotel will hold group functions. Where Peabody's was on the ground floor will be a Pizzeria Uno, a Healthy Choice and a Nestle Toll House Cafe serving gourmet coffees, cookies and muffins.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1994
Baltimore's newest and perhaps most-noted chef, Karim Lakhani, didn't set out to be a culinary star, colleague with the likes of D.C.'s Jean-Louis Palladin and California's Michel Richard, gossip target of Washingtonian magazine. At one point he didn't intend to be a chef at all, in fact; he wanted to be a photographer, or a pilot.But life had already taken several unexpected turns for Mr. Lakhani, born in Africa of Indian descent. His family was well-to-do, with servants and nice cars. But, in 1972, Ugandan dictator Idi Amin ordered all Asians to leave the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | September 28, 1995
Remaking CitronelleCitronelle is still Citronelle, at least for the next few weeks. But there's a good chance one of the city's most important restaurants will have a new name, a new look and a new menu when the Latham Hotel becomes the Clarion.With the sale of the hotel last week by CapStar to Manor Care Hotels, Citronelle's high-profile chef, Karim Lakhani, has returned San Francisco. Sous chef Michael Smith, who has been at the restaurant since it was the Conservatory seven years ago, is now in charge.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | February 21, 1993
Whoever heard of restaurants opening ahead of schedule? It's surprising but true for two eagerly awaited spots in town.Celebrated chef Michel Richard's Citronelle and the historic Eager House made their quiet debuts in the past week or so, despite earlier reports that they wouldn't open until March.Michel Richard will be at the Latham Hotel restaurant for the next few days, and insiders are expected to clamor for tables 17 and 18, the best in the house for watching him work in the exhibition kitchen.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | December 27, 1992
He came. He cooked. He conquered.That was the story when renowned chef Michel Richard made his culinary debut in Baltimore a little more than a week ago.If the seafood-filled, five-course meal was any hint of things to come, Baltimore is in for many treats when Mr. Richard transforms the Conservatory into Citronelle in early March. (The restaurant is located in the Latham Hotel, formerly the Peabody Court.)Velvety smooth salmon terrine. Crab coleslaw with sweet peaches. Chocolate mousse brulee drizzled with caramel.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | April 11, 1993
I love to eat, and I used to go to restaurants all the time." Michel Richard, baker, chef, entrepreneur, raconteur, artist and bon vivant, was sitting one recent morning in his newest Citronelle restaurant, atop the Latham Hotel Baltimore, overlooking Mount Vernon. He has requested, and gotten, a tray of breakfast breads and rolls, which he nibbles with gusto while explaining the role he thinks restaurants should play in modern life."There's nothing better than when you eat in a restaurant and you say, 'Ah, the food was great.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | December 28, 1995
Citronelle is closingWhatever I might have guessed would happen to Citronelle when the Latham Hotel became the Clarion, it wasn't this: One of the city's most important restaurants is closing, and the hotel is opening a food court downstairs.The entire rooftop space is being renovated; where Citronelle was, the hotel will hold group functions. Where Peabody's was on the ground floor will be a Pizzeria Uno, a Healthy Choice and a Nestle Toll House Cafe serving gourmet coffees, cookies and muffins.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | September 28, 1995
Remaking CitronelleCitronelle is still Citronelle, at least for the next few weeks. But there's a good chance one of the city's most important restaurants will have a new name, a new look and a new menu when the Latham Hotel becomes the Clarion.With the sale of the hotel last week by CapStar to Manor Care Hotels, Citronelle's high-profile chef, Karim Lakhani, has returned San Francisco. Sous chef Michael Smith, who has been at the restaurant since it was the Conservatory seven years ago, is now in charge.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | August 19, 1994
Annapolis has a new French-inspired restaurant, Cafe la Mouffe, at 909 Bay Ridge Ave., (410) 263-2233. The cafe is in a handsome old house; its garage has become the bakery, which turns out bread, croissants and focaccia from an authentic French oven. Everything is made on the premises with all fresh ingredients, promises owner Joyce Gomoljak. Entrees range from $7 for half a chicken and salad to $12 for salmon with mango chutney and sweet potatoes.* Citronelle in the Latham Hotel will be open for Sunday brunch beginning Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | August 19, 1994
Annapolis has a new French-inspired restaurant, Cafe la Mouffe, at 909 Bay Ridge Ave., (410) 263-2233. The cafe is in a handsome old house; its garage has become the bakery, which turns out bread, croissants and focaccia from an authentic French oven. Everything is made on the premises with all fresh ingredients, promises owner Joyce Gomoljak. Entrees range from $7 for half a chicken and salad to $12 for salmon with mango chutney and sweet potatoes.* Citronelle in the Latham Hotel will be open for Sunday brunch beginning Sept.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1994
Baltimore's newest and perhaps most-noted chef, Karim Lakhani, didn't set out to be a culinary star, colleague with the likes of D.C.'s Jean-Louis Palladin and California's Michel Richard, gossip target of Washingtonian magazine. At one point he didn't intend to be a chef at all, in fact; he wanted to be a photographer, or a pilot.But life had already taken several unexpected turns for Mr. Lakhani, born in Africa of Indian descent. His family was well-to-do, with servants and nice cars. But, in 1972, Ugandan dictator Idi Amin ordered all Asians to leave the country.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | January 9, 1994
My magazine reading always suffers during the holidays. That's why I didn't see the Bon Appetit December story on Will Greenwood, one of my favorite chefs, until last Sunday. I wondered what had become of young Will, whom I met when he worked in the Baltimore area. Once, we actually cooked together -- as celebrity chefs for the March of Dimes Gourmet Gala.He's now the executive chef at the lovely Jefferson Hotel in Washington, named for our third president and author of the Declaration of Independence.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | June 6, 1993
Citronelle, Latham Hotel, 612 Cathedral St., (410) 727-7101. Open Mondays to Fridays for lunch, Mondays to Saturdays for dinner, Sundays for brunch only. Major credit cards. No-smoking Aarea: yes. Wheelchair accessible: yes. Prices: appetizers, $7.50- $12; entrees, $19-$26.50.Few restaurant openings in Baltimore have been as eagerly awaited as Citronelle's. The luxurious Conservatory, in what was the Peabody Court Hotel (now the Latham), was a hard act to follow. But if anyone could do it, it would be Michel Richard.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | April 11, 1993
I love to eat, and I used to go to restaurants all the time." Michel Richard, baker, chef, entrepreneur, raconteur, artist and bon vivant, was sitting one recent morning in his newest Citronelle restaurant, atop the Latham Hotel Baltimore, overlooking Mount Vernon. He has requested, and gotten, a tray of breakfast breads and rolls, which he nibbles with gusto while explaining the role he thinks restaurants should play in modern life."There's nothing better than when you eat in a restaurant and you say, 'Ah, the food was great.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | February 21, 1993
Whoever heard of restaurants opening ahead of schedule? It's surprising but true for two eagerly awaited spots in town.Celebrated chef Michel Richard's Citronelle and the historic Eager House made their quiet debuts in the past week or so, despite earlier reports that they wouldn't open until March.Michel Richard will be at the Latham Hotel restaurant for the next few days, and insiders are expected to clamor for tables 17 and 18, the best in the house for watching him work in the exhibition kitchen.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser | February 13, 1993
Latham Hotel opens 'signature' restaurantThe Latham Hotel in Baltimore, formerly the Peabody Court, has opened its much-touted "signature" restaurant, Citronelle, several weeks ahead of schedule. By tomorrow, the restaurant should be in "full fling," said George Kelly, the hotel's general manager.Mr. Kelly said the opening was moved up because renovations were completed sooner than expected. At first, the restaurant will be open only for dinner, but Citronelle expects to start promoting lunch and Sunday brunch sometime in March.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | January 9, 1994
My magazine reading always suffers during the holidays. That's why I didn't see the Bon Appetit December story on Will Greenwood, one of my favorite chefs, until last Sunday. I wondered what had become of young Will, whom I met when he worked in the Baltimore area. Once, we actually cooked together -- as celebrity chefs for the March of Dimes Gourmet Gala.He's now the executive chef at the lovely Jefferson Hotel in Washington, named for our third president and author of the Declaration of Independence.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser | February 13, 1993
Latham Hotel opens 'signature' restaurantThe Latham Hotel in Baltimore, formerly the Peabody Court, has opened its much-touted "signature" restaurant, Citronelle, several weeks ahead of schedule. By tomorrow, the restaurant should be in "full fling," said George Kelly, the hotel's general manager.Mr. Kelly said the opening was moved up because renovations were completed sooner than expected. At first, the restaurant will be open only for dinner, but Citronelle expects to start promoting lunch and Sunday brunch sometime in March.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | December 27, 1992
He came. He cooked. He conquered.That was the story when renowned chef Michel Richard made his culinary debut in Baltimore a little more than a week ago.If the seafood-filled, five-course meal was any hint of things to come, Baltimore is in for many treats when Mr. Richard transforms the Conservatory into Citronelle in early March. (The restaurant is located in the Latham Hotel, formerly the Peabody Court.)Velvety smooth salmon terrine. Crab coleslaw with sweet peaches. Chocolate mousse brulee drizzled with caramel.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.