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By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | April 23, 1991
Maryland's much-maligned tax structure -- criticized for unfairly burdening the poor -- actually does a better job than most states in sparing the poor. It does so, however, by hitting the middle class harder than the rich, according to a new study.And, while the state's tax structure has grown more "progressive" over the last six years, the plight of the middle class at tax time has worsened.The study, released yesterday by the Washington-based Citizens for Tax Justice, looked at the relationship between taxes and income in 50 states and District of Columbia.
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NEWS
September 26, 2003
THE FEDERAL government is borrowing to cover a third of its spending apart from Social Security. Next year's deficit will grow by $500 billion. Now President Bush wants $87 billion more for Iraq. And the very richest Americans are enjoying a huge windfall from his historic tax cuts - all funded by borrowing. By now, it's obvious that the president's tax-cut binge - at a time of recession, war and unrestrained domestic spending - is digging a frightening financial hole. But a study released this week by the nonpartisan Citizens for Tax Justice even more sharply highlights this folly by comparing citizens' gains from the tax cuts with the growth in the national debt, to which the cuts greatly contribute.
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NEWS
September 26, 2003
THE FEDERAL government is borrowing to cover a third of its spending apart from Social Security. Next year's deficit will grow by $500 billion. Now President Bush wants $87 billion more for Iraq. And the very richest Americans are enjoying a huge windfall from his historic tax cuts - all funded by borrowing. By now, it's obvious that the president's tax-cut binge - at a time of recession, war and unrestrained domestic spending - is digging a frightening financial hole. But a study released this week by the nonpartisan Citizens for Tax Justice even more sharply highlights this folly by comparing citizens' gains from the tax cuts with the growth in the national debt, to which the cuts greatly contribute.
NEWS
By Molly Ivins | December 2, 2002
AUSTIN, Texas -- OK, Republicans, justify this. I want to hear your explanations for why the Republican leadership went against the will of 318 members to grant an unconscionable gift to corporations that set up offshore tax shelters to avoid paying their U.S. taxes. According to Citizens for Tax Justice, the offshore tax-shelter dodge costs this country as much as $50 billion annually. This amendment was not to shut down the loophole. It was just to prevent rewarding these financial traitors with government contracts.
NEWS
April 28, 1991
In case state legislators needed a reminder, a non-profit group has just reported that Maryland's tax structure is seriously skewed in favor of the rich. A day later, another group gave Maryland a flunking grade in governance because of its unfair and inequitable tax system.The first group, Citizens for Tax Justice, found that middle-class Marylanders pay one-quarter more on a percentage basis in taxes than their wealthier neighbors. Middle-income wage earners end up subsidizing public services for the rich.
NEWS
April 24, 1991
No matter how you slice the pie, taxes are a burden, and the way that burden falls on various groups is a good measure of a society's concern with fairness and equity. This country's commitment to those ideals has been called into question by a new study of state and local taxes. Citizens for Tax Justice, the private research group that released the study this week, has found that the burden of state and local taxes falls much more heavily on poor and middle-class Americans than on affluent taxpayers.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | April 1, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The last time a leading Western politician introduced a flat tax, she paid dearly for it.Margaret Thatcher's 1988 poll, or head, tax on every Briton led to demonstrations around the country and a violent riot in London's Trafalgar Square, and inflamed the "fairness issue" that contributed to her downfall a year later.The ordinary Briton was outraged at the notion that the pauper in public housing had to pay exactly the same tax as the lord in his manor. By popular demand, the head tax, which replaced a value-based property tax, is to be converted into a more progressive system next year.
BUSINESS
By Mick Rood and Mick Rood,States News Service | September 10, 1990
WASHINGTON -- A liberal tax research group here has kicked up another tax policy storm, claiming that most taxpayers would have to foot the bill for the capital gains tax cut President Bush is pushing.Using a computer model to analyze Internal Revenue Service and congressional data, Citizens for Tax Justice said last week that in Maryland, the top 1 percent of joint filers with an average income in 1990 of $784,000 would get an average tax cut of $21,776. The group said couples filing jointly were used because they derive the vast bulk of benefits from reductions in the percentage of capital assets subject to taxation.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 12, 2001
WASHINGTON - More than one-quarter of American adults will not get a tax rebate this year. And nearly 40 percent will not get the full $300 for individuals and $600 for couples. The main reason is that after deductions, exemptions and credits, those people owed little or nothing in income taxes, even though most of them paid Social Security and Medicare taxes. The calculations showing the large number of taxpayers who will not get a rebate were made by Citizens for Tax Justice, a liberal, nonprofit research institute that has the only computer model outside the government that can figure what the new tax law signed last week by President Bush means for people at different income levels.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 4, 2000
WASHINGTON - Texas Gov. George W. Bush repeatedly accused Vice President Al Gore last night of using "fuzzy math" to describe the Republican candidate's tax plan, his Medicare plan and his Social Security plan. But in truth, it is the fuzziness of both candidates' proposals that has allowed their adversaries to manipulate the numbers to their advantage. The biggest target in the fuzzy numbers game has been Bush's tax plan, simply because it is so big. Even its size was the subject of sharp dispute last night, with Gore measuring it at $1.9 trillion over 10 years and Bush putting the price tag at $1.3 trillion.
NEWS
By Molly Ivins | February 25, 2002
AUSTIN, Texas - In response to President Bush's call to all Americans to give service to our country, some are enlisting in the Peace Corps, AmeriCorps, Senior Corps or the armed services. Others have begun putting in their suggested 4,000 hours at a variety of charitable endeavors, through everything from the volunteer fire department to mentoring programs. And still other Americans are moving their companies to Bermuda and the Cayman Islands to avoid paying taxes. Isn't that special? The New York Times reports a "megatrend" among American companies to incorporate in Bermuda in order to sharply reduce their taxes.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 12, 2001
WASHINGTON - More than one-quarter of American adults will not get a tax rebate this year. And nearly 40 percent will not get the full $300 for individuals and $600 for couples. The main reason is that after deductions, exemptions and credits, those people owed little or nothing in income taxes, even though most of them paid Social Security and Medicare taxes. The calculations showing the large number of taxpayers who will not get a rebate were made by Citizens for Tax Justice, a liberal, nonprofit research institute that has the only computer model outside the government that can figure what the new tax law signed last week by President Bush means for people at different income levels.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 4, 2000
WASHINGTON - Texas Gov. George W. Bush repeatedly accused Vice President Al Gore last night of using "fuzzy math" to describe the Republican candidate's tax plan, his Medicare plan and his Social Security plan. But in truth, it is the fuzziness of both candidates' proposals that has allowed their adversaries to manipulate the numbers to their advantage. The biggest target in the fuzzy numbers game has been Bush's tax plan, simply because it is so big. Even its size was the subject of sharp dispute last night, with Gore measuring it at $1.9 trillion over 10 years and Bush putting the price tag at $1.3 trillion.
NEWS
August 8, 1999
Speak up if you want to elect school boardIf you believe the school board should be elected by the citizens of Anne Arundel County instead of being appointed by the governor, it is time to stand up and be counted.At 7 p.m. Aug. 16 at the Arundel Center, 45 Calvert St., Annapolis, the public will get a chance to support a resolution being introduced to the County Council by Councilman Bill Burlison, urging the county's state legislative delegation to provide for an elected school board.More than 90 percent of counties in the United States have elected school boards.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | February 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Republican Rep. Helen Delich Bentley has some Marylanders up in arms over the threat of radically higher taxes, even though Treasury Department officials, advocates for the elderly and others say she is dead wrong.In appearances this week on two "talk" radio stations in Baltimore, Mrs. Bentley criticized President Clinton's economic plan and claimed that he was changing the way the government calculates taxable income. She called that a hint of a big tax increase to come."You're going to be hit in the pocketbook," warns the Baltimore County congresswoman from the 2nd District.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | October 17, 1992
WHAT IS AT STAKETaxes, which hit you where it hurts, are inevitably a core conflict in every presidential campaign. Ever since the cry of "no taxation without representation" went up at the Boston Tea Party, the issue has been central to U.S. politics.Taxes can be politically as well as financially painful: remember Walter Mondale's embrace of tax increases that led to his 1984 defeat; or George Bush's rejection of them in 1988, his acceptance of them in 1990, and his final apologetic flip-flop this year?
NEWS
By David Conn | April 23, 1991
Maryland's poorest families are getting a fairer shake on their state taxes than they did six years ago, but they still pay almost as much in taxes, relative to their income, as the wealthiest citizens in the state, according to a study that calls Maryland's taxation system regressive and inequitable.The study, by Citizens for Tax Justice, a non-profit organization supported by labor and citizens' groups, shows that Maryland families earning in the middle 20 percent of the income spectrum paid 10.6 percent of their 1990 earnings in state personal, property, sales and excise taxes.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | February 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Republican Rep. Helen Delich Bentley has some Marylanders up in arms over the threat of radically higher taxes, even though Treasury Department officials, advocates for the elderly and others say she is dead wrong.In appearances this week on two "talk" radio stations in Baltimore, Mrs. Bentley criticized President Clinton's economic plan and claimed that he was changing the way the government calculates taxable income. She called that a hint of a big tax increase to come."You're going to be hit in the pocketbook," warns the Baltimore County congresswoman from the 2nd District.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | April 1, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The last time a leading Western politician introduced a flat tax, she paid dearly for it.Margaret Thatcher's 1988 poll, or head, tax on every Briton led to demonstrations around the country and a violent riot in London's Trafalgar Square, and inflamed the "fairness issue" that contributed to her downfall a year later.The ordinary Briton was outraged at the notion that the pauper in public housing had to pay exactly the same tax as the lord in his manor. By popular demand, the head tax, which replaced a value-based property tax, is to be converted into a more progressive system next year.
NEWS
By TRB | March 26, 1992
Jerry Brown's campaign technique is to grab onto some issue he's shown no previous sign of caring about, and then to NTC condemn with self-righteous wrath everyone else who fails to join him immediately in his new-found faith. In Mr. Brown's way of thinking, you are hopelessly corrupt if you still think as he thought until the day before yesterday.In his long public career, Jerry Brown never expressed any interest in election-finance reform or tax simplification until now. These are both worthy causes, but they are poisoned by Mr. Brown's transparent opportunism.
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