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Citizen Soldiers

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NEWS
By Jeff Danziger and Jeff Danziger,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 9, 1997
"Citizen Soldiers," by Stephen Ambrose. Simon & Schuster. 512 pages. $27.50. This is Ambrose's second book on the invasion of Europe by Allied troops, starting at the Normandy beaches. It is, in a way, a sequel to "D-Day: The Climatic Battle of World War II" (Simon & Schuster, 656 pages, $27.50), published in 1994. He probably has as complete a grasp of the hellish and fractious events of those days as anyone, which is no small accomplishment. The thousands of units, hundreds of divisions, thousands of aircraft and ships, and millions of men, all coming and going, fighting and retreating, advancing and giving up, are a narrative problem for any historian.
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NEWS
May 13, 2013
I wish to express how delighted I am that the Maryland National Guard is seeing its final deployment to Afghanistan ("Md. Guard preparing for Afghanistan, and after," May 10). Now, let's bring all of them home from the all the other hellholes. (Kosovo, perhaps?) Along with many others, I believe the Maryland Guard is a state resource, and from the beginning of America's ill-advised adventures into Afghanistan and Iraq, I've resented these members of our state's preparedness team being poached for wars halfway around the planet.
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NEWS
By Laird B. Anderson | October 4, 1998
Now that the hype over the movie "Saving Private Ryan" has cooled, it's time to reflect on the men who stormed the shores in Europe and the Pacific during World War II, and the military draft, which ended 25 years ago.The draft's "Greetings" letter started in 1940 and called 93 percent of the 10.5 million men who served during World War II. The draft, the bugle call with origins dating to the citizen-soldier militia of the American Revolution, tore millions...
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | June 15, 2008
WASHINGTON - The news that her oldest son had been killed in Iraq was more than Michelle Murphy could bear. Then she found out how he died. Army Spc. Kendell K. Frederick, a native of Trinidad who arrived in Maryland at age 15 and graduated from Randallstown High School in 2003, had left his base near Tikrit in October 2005 to get fingerprinted for his application for U.S. citizenship. The errand was necessary because the immigration service wouldn't accept the prints he gave when he enlisted.
NEWS
May 13, 2013
I wish to express how delighted I am that the Maryland National Guard is seeing its final deployment to Afghanistan ("Md. Guard preparing for Afghanistan, and after," May 10). Now, let's bring all of them home from the all the other hellholes. (Kosovo, perhaps?) Along with many others, I believe the Maryland Guard is a state resource, and from the beginning of America's ill-advised adventures into Afghanistan and Iraq, I've resented these members of our state's preparedness team being poached for wars halfway around the planet.
NEWS
By Charles M. Madigan and Charles M. Madigan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2003
BEDFORD, Va. -- For Elizabeth Teass, the beginning of a new American war revives distant memories of a conflict that shattered this little Blue Ridge Mountain town, marking it forever as a place defined by the sacrifices of its citizen soldiers. Teass was the Western Union girl down at Green's Pharmacy, a hometown soda shop hangout. She read all the messages that came across the line from Richmond, Va., pasted them on telegram paper and sent them on their way. Each morning she would flip the switch that turned the machine on, say hello to Richmond and wait for telegrams.
FEATURES
By RICHARD O'MARA and RICHARD O'MARA,SUN STAFF | November 24, 1997
Stephen E. Ambrose went a long way after Baltimore.Thirty years ago he was a restive young associate professor of history at the Johns Hopkins University, writing quarrelsome articles for a now defunct newspaper.He wrote about high politics, peace and war, the betrayal of the nation's trust by those rascals in Washington, "the future of mankind." That sort of stuff.The newspaper was The Evening Sun, and Ambrose's pieces appeared on the editorial page.Ambrose was an intellectual controversialist at work in a turbulent time: the late Sixties and early Seventies.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 28, 1990
EASTERN SAUDI ARABIA -- Maryland National Guardsmen -- many of whom carry guns in their jobs back home -- must patrol the perimeter of their desert camp here without bullets in their rifles.Instead, the guardsmen have been told to carry the ammunition for their M-16 rifles in pouches clipped to their belts, according to orders from the base commander.Soldiers say it takes between three and five seconds to load an M-16. As a result, many of these "citizen soldiers" -- members of the 400th Military Police Battalion stationed here as part of Operation Desert Shield -- say they feel unprotected in the face of a possible terrorist attack.
NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | May 16, 1993
Soon after the sun rose yesterday, several dozen members o the National Guard combed the grounds of an Annapolis housing project, bagging everything from old tires to homemade crack pipes.Members of the 1st 158th Cavalry filled bag after bag with trash, broken bottles, beer cans and other debris in the woods along Newtowne Drive in Woodside Gardens."It's great," said Sgt. 1st Class Charles Smith, wiping sweat from his forehead."We're citizen-soldiers, not just someone who goes off to someplace else for a war. We all live in this area, and we want to help take care of it."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 15, 2001
FORT DIX, N.J. - Come October, those keeping the tenuous peace in Bosnia will include an auto mechanic from Perry Hall, a police officer from Crownsville and a construction manager from Baltimore. But on this day, the craggy Balkans have been replicated on a wooded stretch of central New Jersey. Bouncing along in their Humvee, the three dodge a "sniper," speed through a checkpoint and inspect a "Serbian" weapons cache. Mike Mosley, a lanky 31-year-old Army National Guard private and auto mechanic, pokes through the Humvee's turret and fingers his M-249 automatic weapon.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2005
FORT STEWART, Ga. - When a roadside bomb exploded in front of the Maryland infantrymen with a thunderous boom and a blinding cloud of white smoke, the rifle-toting insurgent took full advantage. He shot at the shocked soldiers who had failed to notice the bomb hidden in plain sight. Seconds later, shouting over a hail of blank gunfire, military observers inside the mock Iraqi village pronounced the first casualties. "You're dead, baby," one told Bravo Company Spc. Victor K. Villavicencio, 23, of Gaithersburg.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2004
By raising his right hand and pledging an oath to country, Koji Miyagi did something yesterday that might make many Americans shudder. He joined the Army National Guard. And Miyagi, 28, of Rosedale, didn't sign up for just any unit. He rejoined Bravo Company of the 1st Battalion, 115th Infantry Regiment, specifically because its 130 part-time soldiers will be deployed from Maryland to Iraq early next year. "It's like a family," said Miyagi, a Department of Defense police officer at Aberdeen Proving Ground who left the state's Army Guard about 1 1/2 years ago when his enlistment expired.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 19, 2004
DIYALA PROVINCE, Iraq - Under a bright moon, three Bradley Fighting Vehicles churn along a highway that slices through a parchment-like stretch near the Iranian border. A platoon from the Army National Guard's 30th Brigade Combat Team is searching for an arms cache. Riding in the 33-ton armored vehicle is like being trapped inside a blender grinding ice. After an hour of crunching and whirring, the Bradley stops, its back door whines open and the soldiers spill out into the dusty night air. A collection of one-story houses and sheep pens glows under a spotlight and echoes with the yelps and snarls of dogs.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2004
Told by local Afghans that hundreds of Taliban fighters were holed up in nearby villages and in the mountains above them, Army Warrant Officer Michael J. McInerney led his detachment of 12 Special Forces soldiers from a Maryland Army National Guard unit into the jagged hills in pursuit. The insurgents "scattered like rats," said McInerney, 39, a resident of Alexandria, Va. But between Aug. 25 and Sept. 4 last year, he and his fellow citizen-soldiers, with about 200 Afghan militiamen, tracked the Taliban on foot up the hot, dusty valleys that crease the 9,000- foot peaks north of Dai Chupan, in southern Zabul province.
NEWS
By Charles M. Madigan and Charles M. Madigan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2003
BEDFORD, Va. -- For Elizabeth Teass, the beginning of a new American war revives distant memories of a conflict that shattered this little Blue Ridge Mountain town, marking it forever as a place defined by the sacrifices of its citizen soldiers. Teass was the Western Union girl down at Green's Pharmacy, a hometown soda shop hangout. She read all the messages that came across the line from Richmond, Va., pasted them on telegram paper and sent them on their way. Each morning she would flip the switch that turned the machine on, say hello to Richmond and wait for telegrams.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Scott Banerjee and Sandy Alexander and Scott Banerjee,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2002
Jason Thimmes traded active military service for a civilian job and a role in the Army Reserve so he could spend more time with his wife and children. But next month, he will be on his way to Afghanistan, possibly for a year, to help run a combat support hospital. "My initial reaction was shock and disbelief," Thimmes, of Millersville, said of the call to active duty. He said it can be difficult on his sons, ages 3 and 6, when he leaves for two weeks of training, much less for a year.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2004
Told by local Afghans that hundreds of Taliban fighters were holed up in nearby villages and in the mountains above them, Army Warrant Officer Michael J. McInerney led his detachment of 12 Special Forces soldiers from a Maryland Army National Guard unit into the jagged hills in pursuit. The insurgents "scattered like rats," said McInerney, 39, a resident of Alexandria, Va. But between Aug. 25 and Sept. 4 last year, he and his fellow citizen-soldiers, with about 200 Afghan militiamen, tracked the Taliban on foot up the hot, dusty valleys that crease the 9,000- foot peaks north of Dai Chupan, in southern Zabul province.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2004
By raising his right hand and pledging an oath to country, Koji Miyagi did something yesterday that might make many Americans shudder. He joined the Army National Guard. And Miyagi, 28, of Rosedale, didn't sign up for just any unit. He rejoined Bravo Company of the 1st Battalion, 115th Infantry Regiment, specifically because its 130 part-time soldiers will be deployed from Maryland to Iraq early next year. "It's like a family," said Miyagi, a Department of Defense police officer at Aberdeen Proving Ground who left the state's Army Guard about 1 1/2 years ago when his enlistment expired.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 15, 2001
FORT DIX, N.J. - Come October, those keeping the tenuous peace in Bosnia will include an auto mechanic from Perry Hall, a police officer from Crownsville and a construction manager from Baltimore. But on this day, the craggy Balkans have been replicated on a wooded stretch of central New Jersey. Bouncing along in their Humvee, the three dodge a "sniper," speed through a checkpoint and inspect a "Serbian" weapons cache. Mike Mosley, a lanky 31-year-old Army National Guard private and auto mechanic, pokes through the Humvee's turret and fingers his M-249 automatic weapon.
TOPIC
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | September 5, 1999
THE PHOTOGRAPH of Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower speaking to paratroopers of the 101st Airborne Division on the eve of the D-Day invasion remains one of the most compelling and classic images from World War II.Several years ago, the U.S. Postal Service issued a stamp of the historic moment.Eisenhower appears animated, with an intense expression on his face. His right hand is raised and slightly clenched, and he is speaking directly to a young paratrooper."It's almost the most famous picture of Ike, and everyone knows this picture," said Stephen E. Ambrose, author of "Citizen Soldiers: The U.S. Army from the Normandy Beaches to the Bulge to the Surrender of Germany, June 7, 1944-May 7, 1945," published last year.
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