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Citizen Kane

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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1996
The greatest movie ever, a pair of key figures in the civil rights movement, the greatest soul singer of his generation what a night for superlatives. Oh, yeah, and Miss U.S.A. too.* "Miss U.S.A. Pageant" (9 p.m.-about 11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Sorry, there's no telephone number to call to vote yea or nay on swimsuits; you'll just have to silently put up with a bunch of women parading around in bikinis. There are also evening gown and personality competitions, thank goodness. CBS.* "A. Philip Randolph: For Jobs and Freedom (9 p.m.-10:30 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67)
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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2011
This year's Oscar nominees carry the heritage of art houses and revival theaters into the mainstream and offer vivid similarities or contrasts to past great art and entertainment. Danny Boyle did spectacularly dextrous work to open up the mind of a canyoneer trapped between a boulder and a rock wall — and determined to escape — in "127 Hours. " Decades ago, Robert Bresson used more austere means to even more indelible effect, conveying the spellbinding concentraion and vaulting faith of a French Resistance fighter who springs himself from a Nazi prison fortress in "A Man Escaped" (1957)
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NEWS
February 7, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- Joseph Cotten, the polished Virginian who became a star with "Citizen Kane" and went on to play opposite Marilyn Monroe, Bette Davis, Ingrid Bergman and others, died of pneumonia yesterday at his Los Angeles home. He was 88.Mr. Cotten's smooth, low-key personality made him an ideal leading man for Hollywood's most famous actresses, and his versatility allowed him to play both villains ("Shadow of a Doubt") and heroes ("The Third Man").He came to films via Orson Welles' Mercury Theater and appeared in Mr. Welles' first three movies: "Citizen Kane," "The Magnificent Ambersons" and "Journey into Fear."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | April 12, 2009
Newspaper movies have a proud tradition, one that goes at least as far back as 1931's The Front Page. Over the years, it has produced such crowd favorites as His Girl Friday (1940), Deadline USA (1952) and Absence of Malice (1981), as well as recognized classics like Citizen Kane (1941) and the genre's pinnacle, All the President's Men (1976). State of Play director Kevin Macdonald hopes his film, the newest entry in Hollywood's journalistic canon, isn't the last. "You have to wonder, do people really care about journalism anymore?"
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | July 21, 1991
In 1941, the world changed. Yes, Hitler invaded Russia and Ted Williams hit .406, but I'm talking about important change.Orson Welles invented the movies.I'm well aware that there was a movie industry before "Citizen Kane" opened at Radio City Music Hall and that the great work by Sergei Eisenstein, Charlie Chaplin, John Ford and Frank Capra had all been done. I'm aware that for most Americans then, the movies were a twice-a-week habit, and that the Hollywood machine was at its highest pitch, cranking out about 800 features a year.
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By Chris Kaltenbach | August 4, 1997
Sure, you've heard about how it's one of the greatest films ever, how it's so wondrously photographed, how it's so wittily literate, how Orson Welles was never able to live up to the example he set for himself.But forget all that. "Citizen Kane" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., TCM) is simply a marvelous film, a grand story well told and a lot of fun.There's so much to enjoy: Welles' performance, the crane shot where the guys in the rafters offer their opinion of poor Susan Alexander's opera debut, the ominous visit to the library.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | July 25, 1991
Orson Welles' 1941 ''Citizen Kane'' is showing at the Charles, 50 years after the film was first released. It is a film that deserves all the attention it has won over the decades.The film didn't win the Academy Award for ''best picture of the year'' (''How Green Was My Valley'' was best film of 1941), but it should have. It didn't because of pressure from newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst. Everyone knew that ''Kane'' was really Hearst, including Hearst, who forbade the mention of Welles' name in any of his publications after the film was released.
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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer | September 5, 1994
Tonight, Monday Night Football settles in for its fall run and many of us will settle onto bar stools or into recliners to watch.But what if there's a know-it-all at the neighborhood tavern or in your living room? Worse, what if it's your spouse, offspring or best buddy?Bet him a beer he doesn't know who invented baseball. Or a soda that she doesn't know why Steve Guttenberg's honeymoon in "Diner" is doomed. Maybe even a plate of mozzarella sticks that he can't use "comprise" or "livid" correctly in a sentence.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1999
Was Orson Welles the real victim of "Citizen Kane?"He was according to "RKO 281," a freely fictionalized HBO account of the story behind what would come to be regarded as the greatest U.S. film ever -- a film that, at the time, looked like a clash between a Hollywood Wunderkind and an egotistical media magnate perhaps past his prime, but with enough fight left in him to terrify the boardrooms of every studio in Hollywood.Unfortunately for "RKO 281," that story has already been masterfully told, in an Oscar-nominated documentary from 1996, "The Battle Over Citizen Kane."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | May 2, 2002
The ever-considerate Maryland Film Festival 2002 organizers have made it easy for those planning to attend this year's festivities from the very beginning: As of press time, there was only one movie scheduled for a 10 a.m. start time. But what a movie it is. If you've never seen Orson Welles' Citizen Kane, and wonder why people still talk about this 60-year-old film as if it were the greatest movie ever made, by all means get an early start this morning and see it. Watch as the 26-year-old Welles plays with what he called the best toy-train set a boy ever had -- experimenting, playing against convention, making a film like no one else had ever seen before.
NEWS
By Richard Schickel and Richard Schickel,Los Angeles Times | September 3, 2006
Orson Welles: Hello Americans (Volume 2) Simon Callow Whatever Happened to Orson Welles? A Portrait of an Independent Career Joseph McBride University of Kentucky Press / 384 pages / $29.95 If, as the saying goes, genius is defined by an infinite capacity for taking pains, then Orson Welles was no genius. If, as another saying goes, God is in the details, then there was nothing godlike about him, either - despite the worshipful posturings of his many acolytes. How, people go on wondering, could the man who created Citizen Kane, arguably the greatest of all American films, fritter away the rest of his life - nearly half a century - on movies spoiled by his own inattention or by the machinations of others or, worse, simply abandoned with many of their most significant elements lost?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 23, 2005
Circumstances surrounding the death of one of the major characters in Clint Eastwood's Million Dollar Baby have some columnists, pundits and advocacy groups railing against the movie as immoral, sacrilegious and yet another example of Hollywood's left-leaning bias - and certainly not worthy of its status as an Oscar front-runner. The controversy's effect on the film's Oscar chances (it has been nominated for seven awards, including best picture) remain to be seen. But when you're in the race for an Academy Award, it's likely that controversy will follow.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 7, 2003
MICHAEL Johnson stood before the crowd in one of two theaters in the Heritage CinemaPlex on Taylor Avenue and recalled the time he was a film student at that other University of Maryland - the one near Washington, D.C. "The teacher said we were going to watch the greatest film ever made," Johnson said. "I was right off Park Heights, so I figured we were going to be watching Superfly or Shaft. It turned out the film this teacher had in mind was Birth of a Nation." D.W. Griffith's epic 1915 tale of the Civil War and Reconstruction revolutionized the art of filmmaking, pioneering many techniques in use today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | May 2, 2002
The ever-considerate Maryland Film Festival 2002 organizers have made it easy for those planning to attend this year's festivities from the very beginning: As of press time, there was only one movie scheduled for a 10 a.m. start time. But what a movie it is. If you've never seen Orson Welles' Citizen Kane, and wonder why people still talk about this 60-year-old film as if it were the greatest movie ever made, by all means get an early start this morning and see it. Watch as the 26-year-old Welles plays with what he called the best toy-train set a boy ever had -- experimenting, playing against convention, making a film like no one else had ever seen before.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 2, 2002
The Maryland Film Festival opens tonight with its gala presentation of 10 Under 20, an adventurous collection of animated and live-action shorts, with all their makers in attendance. But the opening feature is Citizen Kane (tomorrow at 10 a.m., at the Charles). It's both an apt opening film for a young festival like Maryland's, and the perfect follow-up to 10 Under 20. For Citizen Kane has always been the quintessential young man's movie. Orson Welles made his first and best mark in film as a 25-year-old boy wonder with this elegant and turbulent 1941 expose of a magnate who resembled William Randolph Hearst.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Special to the Sun | July 22, 2001
Summer's upon us, which means that until Labor Day offerings at the neighborhood googolplex will skew decidedly downward, appealing to audiences with a mean age of 14 (with the emphasis on mean). Luckily, there are loads of smart, well-written books about movies and their makers that have come out in the past year. Even if they can't go to good movies, literate filmgoers can endure that long, dry season until fall by at least reading about them. Ring Lardner, Jr. was the last surviving member of the Hollywood Ten before he died last October.
NEWS
By JOAN MELLEN and JOAN MELLEN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 1996
"Orson Welles: The Road to Xanadu," by Simon Callow. Viking. 640 pages. $32.95Even if he comes to dislike his subject, the biographer is DTC obliged to grant him his due. In the most mean-spirited and cynical biography in memory, British actor and director Simon Callow has chosen as his mission to attack, denigrate and ridicule Orson Welles.Mr. Callow wants to prove that Welles was overrated, a vain, self-serving liar. Mr. Callow insists Welles was a "great fulfiller" rather than an innovator and repeatedly stole credit from others.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 22, 2000
M. Night Shyamalan is about to get a small taste of how Orson Welles felt. Like Welles, whose first film - a little flick called "Citizen Kane" - was so good people were in awe, Shyamalan's maiden effort was advanced beyond what could be expected from a novice filmmaker. His first feature, last year's "The Sixth Sense" (actually it was his second, but nobody saw "Labor of Love"), was as good a shocker as filmgoers have seen in years, displaying an honesty in its narrative and an economy in its storytelling that suggested a veteran director's sure-handed craftsmanship.
NEWS
October 6, 2000
HOW MANY people must Kane bite before the Animal Control Commission realizes that he's a threat to the Millersville community? The 5-year-old pit bull is racking up a list of victims. If he gnashed a notch into his collar for each person he's attacked, he'd have four right now. When the dog was a year old, he scratched a 66-year-old woman who was trying to protect her cat. He bit a 7-year-old boy last year. In August, according to a police report, the dog and another pit bull owned by the same person mauled a 14-year-old girl, biting her leg, nose and arm. Since, a man has reported that Kane recently attacked him. Neighbors told the commission that the dog runs loose through their community.
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