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BUSINESS
Liz F. Kay | October 4, 2011
Citibank will start charging fees in December for several checking accounts that were formerly free , reports the Los Angeles Times. Customers can avoid the fees either by maintaining high balances or by downgrading to a basic account and commiting to direct deposit of paychecks along with at least one automatic payment. You could also keep a combined balance of $1,500 in checking and savings to avoid fees. The news comes on the heels of news that Bank of America will now be charging customers who use their debit cards to make purchases . Citi customers, have you received your notice in the mail?
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | August 14, 2014
If you had a complaint about your credit card last year, about billing or fraud, for instance, you were more likely to live in Maryland than North Dakota. Mid-Atlantic residents had the most credit card complaints per capita, with Maryland ranked overall in the U.S. as the state with the third highest number of complaints, according to a new study. Consumer website ValuePenguin analyzed the more than 13,000 complaints collected by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in 2013 to come up with its findings.
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NEWS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | July 26, 1994
Citibank has decided to close the Towson-based headquarters of its Choice credit card program, eliminating more than 600 full- and part-time jobs, the New York banking company acknowledged yesterday.Some of those losses will be made up in Hagerstown, the headquarters for all of Citibank's credit cards, which will gain 340 telemarketing and computer systems jobs, said Citibank spokeswoman Susan Weeks. About 1,600 people currently work at Hagerstown.But only some of those new jobs will come from Towson, she said, because not all of the workers' skills are transferable, and only some workers may choose to make the move.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
The developers of the stalled Westport Waterfront filed a $225 million suit in bankruptcy court Wednesday alleging that out-of-state financiers posed as potential investors in the project and then conspired with others to upend development plans. Investors based in Utah gained access to confidential information about the project by offering to help refinance it, according to the suit filed by developer Patrick Turner, Thomas Fore, and their companies affiliated with the Westport project.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 1, 1992
It was almost a throwaway line.But at a time when the banking industry is showing signs of regaining its financial balance, Ross Perot chose to resurrect old charges that the nation's largest bank -- Citibank -- is insolvent.Appearing Monday night on a live broadcast on ABC News, he answered a question about Japanese ownership of the Seattle Mariners baseball team by calling it an example of how the United States is "losing in international competition."Then, veering into banking as an example, he noted that the largest U.S. bank is only the 21st-largest in the world and contended that "if you ever take the Third World loans that'll never be paid out, it's insolvent."
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | June 13, 1993
Citibank has introduced a program in which its Visa and MasterCard customers can obtain frequent-flier points by charging purchases on their credit cards.It replaces a similar program, operated by an outside concern, called Air Miles, which has been suspended in the United States.Maria Rullo, a spokeswoman for Citibank, said the new program is called CitiMiles and will credit a cardholder with one mile of travel for each $15 charged.Points in the old program have been transferred to CitiMiles, and earned flights can be taken on any major airline; the Air Miles plan was limited to four carriers.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau | April 21, 1992
NEW YORK -- Add to your wallet (already bulging with a mug shot on your driver's license, company ID and assorted entry passes) yet another smiling picture of yourself -- this time on your credit card.Citibank, the nation's largest issuer of bank and credit cards, announced yesterday that it will introduce "photocards" containing individual pictures burned into the upper right corner on the flip side of gold and classic MasterCards and Visas.The move comes after several months of intermittent testing in Washington, New York and other locations.
NEWS
By Saul Hansell and Saul Hansell,New York Times News Service | March 29, 1993
After a decade of self-deception, Americans have finally begun to face the truth about how much interest they actually pay on their credit cards. And now, for the first time, many consumers are shopping for a card that will charge them a lower rate.For years, many consumers were drawn to Master Cards and Visa cards issued by banks mainly on the basis of which one offered the highest credit limit.Studies show that the vast majority of cardholders simply pretended to themselves that they didn't pay any interest, when two-thirds of them did. Thus they were undisturbed by interest rates that stubbornly remained around 19 percent even as other rates fell sharply.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 27, 1994
Citibank foreclosed on Towson.Israel is making peace with everyone. Those taking it hardest are the American true believers in maximalist Palestinian aspirations.Whitewater must have been a good investment. Congressional Republicans are sure investing in it.American Joe Who?
BUSINESS
By David Conn and Kim Clark and David Conn and Kim Clark,Staff Writers | April 28, 1992
Citicorp announced yesterday that it will lay off 149 people, or nearly 15 percent of the work force, from the Towson headquarters of its Choice credit card program as part of a companywide reorganization of credit card operations.The restructuring also will affect Citicorp's Hagerstown customer service center, where about two dozen people are expected to lose their jobs out of roughly 1,700 who work there, a Citicorp spokeswoman said.The New York banking company told its employees yesterday that the various supporting operations for the company's two MasterCard and Visa divisions -- the Citibank and Choice brands will be combined, although the separate cards will remain.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2012
For the last dozen years, Vince Talbert has focused on one thing: Bill Me Later. The 45-year-old Baltimore native co-founded the online payment company with three partners in 2000. The company helps Internet shoppers buy stuff online without a credit card. In 2008, PayPal, an eBay subsidiary, bought Bill Me Later for $945 million. Talbert, a marketing professional, and his partners made a lot of money and went to work for the bigger online payment company. Lately, Talbert has developed a deep interest in supporting educational technology startups in the Baltimore area.
BUSINESS
Liz F. Kay | October 4, 2011
Citibank will start charging fees in December for several checking accounts that were formerly free , reports the Los Angeles Times. Customers can avoid the fees either by maintaining high balances or by downgrading to a basic account and commiting to direct deposit of paychecks along with at least one automatic payment. You could also keep a combined balance of $1,500 in checking and savings to avoid fees. The news comes on the heels of news that Bank of America will now be charging customers who use their debit cards to make purchases . Citi customers, have you received your notice in the mail?
EXPLORE
June 14, 2011
Laurel Citibank made a $1,000 donation to the Laurel High School Spanish Club June 13. The money will be used to fund various club activities, including Hispanic Heritage Month, Book Club, educational trips and the club's scholarship program for deserving students.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | May 23, 2011
Sounds like some banks have instituted new fees that you might not expect for certain services, according to the Wall Street Journal . The article states that Citibank says they are going to stop charging five percent for depositing coins at its Illinois location, which is a relief. I could see a retail store getting a little peeved if you tried to pay for a large purchase in pennies, but I'd still expect them to accept them: coins areĀ  valid currency. But a bank? Ridiculous --- and a good reason to take your business to a bank that offers free coin-counting services to customers.
BUSINESS
By Barbara Rose and Barbara Rose,Chicago Tribune | December 26, 2007
CHICAGO -- There are only four business days left in the year, in case you were counting, but not many people will work all of them. We've entered the season when the working world divides into two camps. In many offices, any attempt at strenuous effort gives way to a pleasant drift toward the new year because there are too few people working to get anything accomplished. People who go into the offices can count on taking relaxing reading breaks at their desks. Or if they are Type A's, they can clean up their Outlook files.
BUSINESS
By Carolyn Bigda and Carolyn Bigda,Chicago Tribune | March 11, 2007
When you watch Janne O'Donnell and Trisha Johnson talk, you almost vow on the spot to never use a credit card again. Each is a mom with a college-age child who committed suicide while loaded with credit-card debt. They are among many people interviewed in a new film documentary, Maxed Out, which explores the U.S. consumer's addiction to debt and unapologetically blames the industry as making it nearly impossible for people to ever get clean. But Americans' credit problems cannot be blamed entirely on the banks, of course.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
The developers of the stalled Westport Waterfront filed a $225 million suit in bankruptcy court Wednesday alleging that out-of-state financiers posed as potential investors in the project and then conspired with others to upend development plans. Investors based in Utah gained access to confidential information about the project by offering to help refinance it, according to the suit filed by developer Patrick Turner, Thomas Fore, and their companies affiliated with the Westport project.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and Kim Clark and David Conn and Kim Clark,Staff Writers | April 28, 1992
Citicorp announced yesterday that it will lay off 149 people, or nearly 15 percent of the work force, from the Towson headquarters of its Choice credit card program as part of a companywide reorganization of credit card operations.The restructuring also will affect Citicorp's Hagerstown customer service center, where about two dozen people are expected to lose their jobs out of roughly 1,700 who work there, a Citicorp spokeswoman said.The New York banking company told its employees yesterday that the various supporting operations for the company's two MasterCard and Visa divisions -- the Citibank and Choice brands -- will be combined, although the separate cards will remain.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2002
Two-and-a-half months after being shaken by a currency trading scandal that resulted in a $691.2 million loss, Allfirst Financial Inc. said yesterday that the executive in charge of its risk assessment group will retire at the end of May. Brian L. King, 56, who has worked at Allfirst for more than 25 years, will leave to devote more time to charitable and other nonprofit organizations, the company announcement said. King, whose group oversees a number of areas, including internal audit, legal and credit review, did not return calls.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,Washington Post Writers Group | May 13, 2001
CAN YOU spend your way into building a college-savings account? A new company called Upromise thinks the answer is yes. Upromise's idea sounds good. Every time you buy certain goods or services, or shop at certain stores, a small portion of your purchase can be funneled into a college account. You'll save money without even thinking about it. To build a tidy sum, however, you have to patronize the sponsoring merchants - not just now but for years into the future. Will you buy books at Borders rather than Amazon?
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