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April 12, 2012
I am so saddened about to read that the Piccadilly Circus is coming to Howard County ("Piccadilly Circus coming to county fairgrounds," April 5). Not only that, this article provided them with free advertising. Circus animals suffer inordinately in these venues. Please do not support any circuses that use animals. Instead enjoy the wonderful Big Apple Circus or others like it. This will teach compassion and civility to our children and others. Choosing Civility would only lead to the choice of not attending/supporting circuses such as Piccadilly, Ringling, etc. Barbara Glick Columbia
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
If you happen upon Happenstance Theater during the next few weeks, count on some good old-fashioned entertainment. The ensemble makes its local debut at the Baltimore Theatre Project with two family-friendly shows celebrating vintage circuses and clowns. "We have a tendency toward the nostalgic," says Sabrina Mandell, who serves as co-artistic director, business manager, performer and more. The company got its start in the Washington metro area by, well, happenstance. Mandell, a visual artist and former sailer aboard rigged schooners, met Mark Jaster, a student of mime legend Marcel Marceau, at a clown workshop in 2006 and the two hit it off - so well that they got married and launched their own theater troupe, Happenstance Theater.
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April 12, 2012
Howard County Fairgrounds is hosting a traveling show of sorrow, fear, and pain this week. A circus that uses exotic animals as "entertainment" is coming to town. I urge all Maryland residents to say "no" to financially supporting circuses that use wild animals. Please ask you congressperson to support HR 3359, the Traveling Exotic Animal Protection Act, and help end the use of exotic animals in traveling circuses. Jennifer Jones Columbia
NEWS
April 2, 2014
Elephants from the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus visited a Baltimore staple Wednesday for a mid-circus snack. In town for performances at the Baltimore Arena since March 26 through April 6, the elephants visited the Lexington Market for a vegetarian buffet. Four Asian elephants made the trip, munching on bananas, carrots, apples and more outside the venue. Circus fans and children looked on in a rare opportunity to see the pachyderms on city streets. The meal is a staple alongside the circus, and has been held annually for 30 years while the elephants are in town.
FEATURES
By Amanda Smear and Amanda Smear,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2003
As the lights go down under the UniverSoul Circus big top and a hush comes over the anxious children in the crowd, a single spotlight breaks through the darkness and all attention is focused on Nichele Mason, clad in a simple black cloak and white gloves. Long before the Chilean stunt dogs, Brazilian showgirls, Gabonese stuntmen or boxing kangaroo come out to wow the audience, all eyes are on Mason, a Baltimore resident who interprets all spoken aspects of the circus into sign language.
FEATURES
By David Haldane and David Haldane,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 10, 1999
When Circus Chimera opened recently in Anaheim, Calif., it had the usual fare: jugglers, clowns, acrobats, trapeze artists.What set the show apart was what it didn't have.There were no elephants doing headstands, no lions or tigers snarling at trainers, no monkeys clinging to bareback riders on galloping horses. Every performer was human.It's about time, animal-rights advocates and some circus officials say. "The show is better without the animals," said James Judkins, who created Circus Chimera last year in Hugo, Okla.
NEWS
May 8, 1992
... 1/8 TC There is something thrilling, yet so innocent, about a circus coming to town. We know an artist, now retired, who spent his vacations following circuses throughout the country. To him, circuses and the people associated with them offered a dose of magic not obtainable anywhere else. He felt reinvigorated after a couple of weeks of animal acts, clowns and trapeze wizardry.Fans of all ages have cause for celebration because the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus is back in Baltimore for the first time in five years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | July 26, 2011
You've been following the debt ceiling debate, right? What? You haven't been? Why not? Is it because watching people argue over long-term debt restructuring makes your eyes glaze over? We don't blame you. So while you've been doing something clearly more interesting - say, rearranging your [insert secret, obscure hobby here] collection -  we've been following the “mano-a-mano” struggle between President Barack Obama and House of Representatives Speaker John Boehner.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2010
Here's a sampling of what to look for at this year's circus: Getting up-close and personal : An hour before the show starts, ticket-buyers (at no additional charge) will get a chance to meet and talk with the performers, maybe get some autographs and even see an elephant that paints. Every kid's dream : During the show, three lucky kids actually get to control their parents, levitating them off the floor (although they will come back down to earth eventually). How cool is that?
NEWS
April 2, 2011
I am deeply troubled by The Sun's promotion of animal circuses as fun-filled family events. ("50 ways to spring forward," March 18). Animals don't wear demeaning costumes, stand on each others' backs, or jump through rings of fire by choice. It is only through cruel training methods that these majestic animals perform such behaviors. One need only do a quick Internet search to find hundreds of circus training videos depicting elephants, tigers, bears and horses being shackled, shocked or beaten with sharp hooks.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2013
The Thanksgiving meal waiting inside was warm and rich, but the scores of people standing in line outside at the Virginia S. Baker Recreation Center on Thursday morning looked somber as the cold wind whipped past them. But just after 10 a.m., a tiny woman in a leopard-print jacket and purple and black leotard showed up and began building an aerial rig resembling a giant swing set rising 22 feet into the sky in nearby Patterson Park. A group of friends — some buskers, some clowns, also dressed frivolously in tutus or cowboy vests — took to stilts or grabbed a hula hoop and began twirling.
EXPLORE
By Lane Page | May 22, 2013
The circus has come to town! And it's the clown, jokes Greg May, who is running the business. A Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Clown College graduate and former member of its circus troupe, May is the clown in question, and the Center Ring Circus School is his own arena. Raised in Columbia, the Hammond High School alumnus is the son of community pioneers Betty (a swim, dance and theater instructor) and the late Dr. Gerald (a theologian, psychiatrist, author and possessor of a “sense of humor every bit as wacky as his circus clown son”)
TRAVEL
By Rachael Pacella, For The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
People come back to Ocean City for the traditions - a favorite restaurant, beach spot or mini-golf course. For visitors looking to try something different, this season has a lot of new things to offer, whether you eat at the town's new (and only) Jewish deli, grab a beer at a new craft brewery or take time to go to the circus. And while you're enjoying what's new under the sun, take a moment to look at what's beneath your feet. The town just finished up the second and final phase of its three-year, $6 million boardwalk renovation project.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
Rudolph S. Gebhardt, who went from being a circus performer to a banker, died Sept. 10 of a blood clot at his Clearwater, Fla., home. The former longtime Glen Arm resident was 86. The son of Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus performers, Mr. Gebhardt was born in Baltimore and made his circus debut when he was 9 at the old Madison Square Garden in New York City, performing with his family's horses act. After the 1939 circus strike, he and his family free-lanced and worked for other circuses, horse shows, fairs and rodeos.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2012
A Baltimore circus-arts instructor and her students are at Niagara Falls today, where they'll be helping to prime the live audience for Friday's televised walk across the falls by high-wire artist Nik Wallenda. "It's going to be chaotic," Erica Saben, founder of Charm City Movement Arts, said Friday morning after arriving at Niagara Falls the previous afternoon. "I hope we'll get a good spot to watch the walk ourselves. We'll have to see how big the media hype is. " Wallenda's family has been walking high wires as the Flying Wallendas for generations.
SPORTS
June 10, 2012
South Beach needs talents Omar Kelly Sun Sentinel Let us play connect the dots. The Dolphins are in need of solid, proven playmaking receivers, and general manager Jeff Ireland wouldn't rule out adding one after the draft. Ireland loves to explore acorns, and Ochocinco, a native of South Florida, seems to have just fallen off a tree in New England. Ochocinco grew up loving the Dolphins and often attended Miami's home games during his bye weeks.
NEWS
October 19, 1993
Enough is enough. The time has come for Anne Arundel County's Traveling Jail Circus to find a place to pitch its tents for good.While the existing county jail gets more outdated and overcrowded by the day, the traveling circus has spent nearly two years hopping from place to place -- packing up and moving when each community and its elected representatives start screaming. First Glen Burnie. Then Pasadena. South County. Crownsville. Millersville (the choice of a county executive-appointed site selection committee)
FEATURES
By N.Y. Times | September 11, 1991
NEW YORK -- Fire eaters, mimes, dancing nuns, Roman centurions and a high-school marching band from Long Island. What could it be? What else: a perfume introduction.Next week, Saks Fifth Avenue will transform its main floor to introduce Moschino, the new fragrance by the Italian designer Franco Moschino. Patti LaBelle will sing, wine will served from perfume bottles and Moschino will enter with look-alikes of Queen Elizabeth and the pope.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2012
Long before the throngs of audience members generate "oohs" and "ahhs," the staff of the UniverSoul Circus begins to craft its unusual performances, spending months combing the globe for fresh acts. The result includes performers such as the Shaolin Kung Fu acrobats from China and hip-hop contortionists from Guinea. With this array of international talent, it's fitting that this year's tour has been entitled "US. " "In our mind, when you come to UniverSoul, you see a culture that really mirrors society," said Paula Murphy, executive vice president of the traveling circus, which performs at Security Square Mall through Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, Special To The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
Steve Fox and Martha Todd, owners of Towson's Bread and Circuses Bistro, know how to get things done — and that bodes well for their restaurant. Right now, the food at Bread and Circuses is on the safe side and the service needs fine-tuning. But Fox and Todd already have some plans in the works for the menu, and with their can-do attitude, the petite bistro has the potential to be something special. Fox and Todd have been hustling since 2009 when they opened French Press Cafe, a small coffee shop in downtown Towson.
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