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By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 20, 1998
LAS VEGAS -- Circus Circus Enterprises Inc. said yesterday that Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Clyde Turner resigned, and that the casino company will take a fourth-quarter charge of 8 cents a share to settle his employment contract.Turner, 59, led an expansion that included two casinos and the $800 million Project Paradise resort being built in Las Vegas. He is being replaced by Michael Ensign, also 59, vice chairman and chief operating officer, who is one of the company's biggest investors with about 6.5 million shares.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 6, 2012
Nobody asked me but . . . . Few things are worse than having the aromas and flavors of a warm, brick-oven, wood-fired pizza (with rapini and soppressata) wiped away by a waitress who sprays Windex-type disinfectant on the table next to you while you're still dining. The Super Bowl has come and gone - time to protest the new puppy store in Columbia! Scientists who track these things believe last September's big storms may have drowned much of the region's stink bug population.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 14, 1998
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. -- Hilton Hotels Corp. said yesterday that it is in talks to buy Circus Circus Enterprises Inc., a purchase likely to total more than $4 billion and add well-known casino resorts such as Luxor to its gaming business.Hilton said that if a deal is concluded, it would separate its hotels and casino resorts in a tax-free spinoff. The gaming company would then combine with Circus Circus, one of the biggest casino operators, through a stock swap.Combining Hilton's casino operations with Circus Circus would create the largest U.S. gaming company by far. It would be the biggest in Las Vegas, the leading gaming market.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 14, 1998
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. -- Hilton Hotels Corp. said yesterday that it is in talks to buy Circus Circus Enterprises Inc., a purchase likely to total more than $4 billion and add well-known casino resorts such as Luxor to its gaming business.Hilton said that if a deal is concluded, it would separate its hotels and casino resorts in a tax-free spinoff. The gaming company would then combine with Circus Circus, one of the biggest casino operators, through a stock swap.Combining Hilton's casino operations with Circus Circus would create the largest U.S. gaming company by far. It would be the biggest in Las Vegas, the leading gaming market.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1994
Orthomet drops Kirschner offerOrthomet Inc., locked in a battle with Biomet Inc. for Timonium-based Kirschner Medical Corp., said it withdrew its sweetened offer for the orthopedic-implant company.James Hawley, Orthomet's executive vice president, declined to comment further.On Wednesday, Orthomet offered 1.3 shares of its common stock for each share of Kirschner stock plus warrants giving holders the right to buy 1.3 shares of Orthomet stock at $10 a share for the next seven years. Minneapolis-based Orthomet boosted its offer after Biomet Inc., a competitor based in Warsaw, Ind., offered on Monday to buy Kirschner for $10 a share.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 26, 1996
LAS VEGAS -- Only three years after the last building boom added 10,000 rooms to the Las Vegas Strip, the gaming industry's biggest companies are preparing to outdo themselves yet again.On New Year's Eve, the Hacienda, a 1,100-room hotel that was once a lone outpost at the distant south end of the Strip, will be demolished by its new owner, Circus Circus Enterprises, to make room for a 4,000-room hotel complex in 1998.Three days into 1997 comes the scheduled opening of New York-New York, a 2,000-room resort whose eye-catching design -- consisting of scaled-down models of the Empire State and Chrysler buildings as well as Trump Tower, the Statue of Liberty and Grand Central Station -- has already made it a must-see location on the Strip.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | February 17, 1993
Bet on it: Gambling, whether you like it or not, will continue to expand throughout the country.As a result of that belief, shareholders in gaming companies have hit the jackpot for two straight years, their shares running up significantly in price.Such fortune is expected to continue as legalized gambling -- from riverboats to casinos to hotels -- becomes a growth industry of the 1990s. It's no longer simply the domain of Nevada or Atlantic City.Politicians around the nation, you see, are afraid to raise taxes.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | December 14, 1992
Corporate America has moved heavily into casino gambling, effectively elbowing the mob aside. And now the big casino operators have begun to repackage one of man's oldest vices as clean family fun.That's the story told by David Johnston of The Philadelphia Inquirer in his new book, ''Temples of Chance -- How America Inc. Bought Out Murder Inc. to Win Control of the Casino Business'' (Doubleday).It's a pretty chilling picture. Mr. Johnston relates, for example, multiple incidents of teen-agers being welcome in some of Atlantic City's leading casinos, frequently plied with free drinks, and allowed to gamble freely so long as they're losing.
FEATURES
By Randy Mink and Randy Mink,Copley News Service | May 23, 1993
From the neon canyons of Las Vegas to the sandy shores of New Jersey, more and more vacationers are taking a chance on gambling holidays.The U.S. gaming industry has seen explosive growth over the past decade and appears to be an odds-on favorite to leadtourism and entertainment development into the 21st century.Despite recessionary times, gambling has been growing 10 percent annually, and the rate is even more phenomenal at Indian-sponsored casinos around the country.In a recent survey of motor-coach tour operators, the American Bus Association found gambling meccas among the hottest group-tour destinations.
NEWS
By TED CHAN | October 20, 1991
The extremely tall gentleman was not a good blackjack player -- and the woman from San Antonio, Texas let him know it.He laughed off her good-natured teasing and everyone within earshot shared the guffaws. Finally, she said: "You know, a guy as big as you should have learned to play basketball. You should just give up on blackjack." The dealer and the pit boss nearly fell down laughing.He was basketball legend Wilt Chamberlin.Las Vegas has that way of throwing people off guard. There's a lot more -- or less -- to it than meets the eyes in the mix of tourists from across America and beyond.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 20, 1998
LAS VEGAS -- Circus Circus Enterprises Inc. said yesterday that Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Clyde Turner resigned, and that the casino company will take a fourth-quarter charge of 8 cents a share to settle his employment contract.Turner, 59, led an expansion that included two casinos and the $800 million Project Paradise resort being built in Las Vegas. He is being replaced by Michael Ensign, also 59, vice chairman and chief operating officer, who is one of the company's biggest investors with about 6.5 million shares.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 26, 1996
LAS VEGAS -- Only three years after the last building boom added 10,000 rooms to the Las Vegas Strip, the gaming industry's biggest companies are preparing to outdo themselves yet again.On New Year's Eve, the Hacienda, a 1,100-room hotel that was once a lone outpost at the distant south end of the Strip, will be demolished by its new owner, Circus Circus Enterprises, to make room for a 4,000-room hotel complex in 1998.Three days into 1997 comes the scheduled opening of New York-New York, a 2,000-room resort whose eye-catching design -- consisting of scaled-down models of the Empire State and Chrysler buildings as well as Trump Tower, the Statue of Liberty and Grand Central Station -- has already made it a must-see location on the Strip.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 4, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In a city teeming with lobbyists peddling pet interests, even jaded politicians crack a smile when former Florida Rep. Andy Ireland plunks down his business card on Congress members' desks.It features a prancing horse, two elephants and a red-capped clown.Mr. Ireland, 65, lobbies for Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, a business that sees potential local and national legislation as no laughing matter. He is part of a cast of thousands who have sway over much of the work that is done in Washington.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1994
Orthomet drops Kirschner offerOrthomet Inc., locked in a battle with Biomet Inc. for Timonium-based Kirschner Medical Corp., said it withdrew its sweetened offer for the orthopedic-implant company.James Hawley, Orthomet's executive vice president, declined to comment further.On Wednesday, Orthomet offered 1.3 shares of its common stock for each share of Kirschner stock plus warrants giving holders the right to buy 1.3 shares of Orthomet stock at $10 a share for the next seven years. Minneapolis-based Orthomet boosted its offer after Biomet Inc., a competitor based in Warsaw, Ind., offered on Monday to buy Kirschner for $10 a share.
FEATURES
By Randy Mink and Randy Mink,Copley News Service | May 23, 1993
From the neon canyons of Las Vegas to the sandy shores of New Jersey, more and more vacationers are taking a chance on gambling holidays.The U.S. gaming industry has seen explosive growth over the past decade and appears to be an odds-on favorite to leadtourism and entertainment development into the 21st century.Despite recessionary times, gambling has been growing 10 percent annually, and the rate is even more phenomenal at Indian-sponsored casinos around the country.In a recent survey of motor-coach tour operators, the American Bus Association found gambling meccas among the hottest group-tour destinations.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | February 17, 1993
Bet on it: Gambling, whether you like it or not, will continue to expand throughout the country.As a result of that belief, shareholders in gaming companies have hit the jackpot for two straight years, their shares running up significantly in price.Such fortune is expected to continue as legalized gambling -- from riverboats to casinos to hotels -- becomes a growth industry of the 1990s. It's no longer simply the domain of Nevada or Atlantic City.Politicians around the nation, you see, are afraid to raise taxes.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 6, 2012
Nobody asked me but . . . . Few things are worse than having the aromas and flavors of a warm, brick-oven, wood-fired pizza (with rapini and soppressata) wiped away by a waitress who sprays Windex-type disinfectant on the table next to you while you're still dining. The Super Bowl has come and gone - time to protest the new puppy store in Columbia! Scientists who track these things believe last September's big storms may have drowned much of the region's stink bug population.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 4, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In a city teeming with lobbyists peddling pet interests, even jaded politicians crack a smile when former Florida Rep. Andy Ireland plunks down his business card on Congress members' desks.It features a prancing horse, two elephants and a red-capped clown.Mr. Ireland, 65, lobbies for Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, a business that sees potential local and national legislation as no laughing matter. He is part of a cast of thousands who have sway over much of the work that is done in Washington.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | December 14, 1992
Corporate America has moved heavily into casino gambling, effectively elbowing the mob aside. And now the big casino operators have begun to repackage one of man's oldest vices as clean family fun.That's the story told by David Johnston of The Philadelphia Inquirer in his new book, ''Temples of Chance -- How America Inc. Bought Out Murder Inc. to Win Control of the Casino Business'' (Doubleday).It's a pretty chilling picture. Mr. Johnston relates, for example, multiple incidents of teen-agers being welcome in some of Atlantic City's leading casinos, frequently plied with free drinks, and allowed to gamble freely so long as they're losing.
NEWS
By TED CHAN | October 20, 1991
The extremely tall gentleman was not a good blackjack player -- and the woman from San Antonio, Texas let him know it.He laughed off her good-natured teasing and everyone within earshot shared the guffaws. Finally, she said: "You know, a guy as big as you should have learned to play basketball. You should just give up on blackjack." The dealer and the pit boss nearly fell down laughing.He was basketball legend Wilt Chamberlin.Las Vegas has that way of throwing people off guard. There's a lot more -- or less -- to it than meets the eyes in the mix of tourists from across America and beyond.
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