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By FROM BALTIMORESUN.COM AND SUN STAFF REPORTS | February 24, 2006
Baltimore County police have charged a 16-year-old boy in the shooting of his girlfriend while the two were in his bedroom Thursday. Richard Nelson Foltz IV of the first block of Ivy Bridge Court in the Reisterstown area has been charged as an adult with first-degree assault, reckless endangerment and felony use of a handgun in a violent crime, according to police. Foltz is being held on $500,000 bail. His 15-year-old girlfriend, Angela Holyfield, was taken to Maryland Shock Trauma Center with a gunshot wound to the chest after officers were called to Foltz's home at 4:42 p.m. Thursday.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
COLLEGE PARK - Mark Turgeon's two distinct memories of Len Bias have lasted three decades. The first occurred when Turgeon was a sophomore point guard at Kansas, sharing the same court at the Greak Alaskan Shootout with a junior rising star from Maryland. "Dunked on him," the Terps coach joked this week. In reality, Turgeon recalled how the muscular, 6-foot-8 power forward scraped his head on the bottom of the backboard after going in for a dunk. "That was the first time I had seen that," Turgeon said.
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NEWS
January 26, 2012
"We need to understand what circumstances led to this incident," said an archdiocese spokesman ("Archdiocese investigating priest: He's suspended indefinitely after arrest on charges of indecent exposure," Jan. 24). Celibacy, that unnatural restriction, is forced on clergymen by the male-dominated Vatican. That's what led to these circumstances. Until the Catholic Church understands that it must change, these circumstances will lead other clergy to expose the church to embarrassment as a result of their natural desires.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
A female student at Towson University died Saturday night at an off-campus residence, a university spokeswoman said. The university did not immediately identify the student or the circumstances of her death. University spokeswoman Gay Pinder said the cause of death was not violence, but she declined to elaborate. Towson officials have been in touch with the family, who live out-of-state, Pinder said. She did not say where the student was from. Baltimore County Police and Fire departments said they had not fielded any calls related to the incident and were not handling the investigation.
NEWS
April 6, 2004
JAMES SMITH DUDLEY, age, 57, of Rising Sun, MD died on March 3, 2004. Due to circumstances beyond the family's control, the service will be re-scheduled for 11:00 A.M., May 8, 2004 at Rising Sun Middle School.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2002
A Pikesville man whose illegal property flipping defrauded lenders out of as much as $2.5 million was sentenced to six months yesterday by a federal judge who recommended that he be sent to a halfway house. Leon Wilkowsky was also ordered to serve six months' home detention after he leaves the halfway house, to be followed by three years of supervised release and 400 hours of community service. He was also ordered to pay $25,000 apiece to two community organizations that are trying to cope with the effects of flipping.
NEWS
November 26, 1992
Giving thanks is a sacred obligation in most religions. St. Paul, for example, exhorted the Thessalonian Greeks to "rejoice always," regardless of circumstance. Yet Thanksgiving also is a secular obligation. George Washington proclaimed the first formal Thanksgiving of the new American nation in 1789.The deist Thomas Jefferson, squeamish about religious overtones (giving thanks to Whom?), refused to proclaim a day of thanksgiving, and the holiday was observed sporadically, mostly by individual states, until Abraham Lincoln established in 1863 the tradition of annual Thanksgiving celebrations continued in George Bush's proclamation for today (excerpted on the page opposite.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | January 31, 2005
ATLANTA - Before I was conceived, I did an exceptional job of choosing my parents. Sitting there in Elysium (or wherever I was before conception), I decided to be born to black parents in the segregated South. But I didn't want to be severely limited by my circumstances, so I chose a young couple who were married, employed and had graduate degrees, who were untroubled by alcoholism or criminal history. What? You doubt me? You don't think that's how I came to be born into middle-class circumstances?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | June 9, 2002
The Encyclopedia of Kidnappings, by Michael Newton (Facts-On-File, 416 pages, $75 hardcover; $21.95 paper) I am usually indifferent or crueler about contrived books -- endless lists, duplicative quotations, trivia parcels. And emphatically, I would prefer not to be kidnapped, finding the whole subject threatening. But here is a compendium that for all the grimness of the subject, is compellingly interesting. Hundreds of listings include victims -- many famous -- as well as perpetrators and scenes or circumstances (Achille Lauro.
NEWS
November 27, 2012
Former Gov. Robert Ehrlich is still whining about the GOP defeat in 2012 ("How Republicans can win in 2016," Nov. 25). He seems to think that next time the public will embrace the same philosophy that it rejected this year. Forget about helping the less fortunate, and insist that women who don't want to bear a child but have become pregnant - regardless of the circumstances - go through with an unwanted birth? Those ideas, among others, will only guarantee the same result four years from now. Wake up Bob, and look around before you lose again.
SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga and Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
After being traded in December because the Orioles didn't want to spend an estimated $10 million in arbitration on a closer, Jim Johnson returned to Camden Yards on Friday wearing the green and gold of the Oakland Athletics. “It's a little different. I mean, a lot of memories,” said Johnson, who was drafted by the Orioles in 2001, made his big league debut in 2006 and was a key member of the bullpen since 2008. “It's obviously different going into a different clubhouse. It's cool.” Johnson came back Friday not as the A's closer but as a struggling reliever who lost his closer role after blowing one save, losing two games and allowing seven runs over his first five outings.
NEWS
By Theodore G. Venetoulis | February 15, 2014
To someone who has been engaged for most of his life in both politics and the media, the parallel story lines of Chris Christie and Rupert Murdoch are fascinating. Both hold reputations as tough, hard-fisted taskmasters - brilliant, successful, in their respective fields: Murdoch as a publisher, Christie as a politician. Until recently, that is. They've stumbled. Some say mightily; others suggest only modestly. Governor Christie and his staff are under investigation for allegedly clogging up bridges, using federal funds inappropriately, bullying local officials and plying friendly politicians with appointments and lucrative projects.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2013
Baltimore's fire department is investigating the circumstances of a fire at the University of Maryland Medical Center that left a patient dead. Mary Lynn Carver, a spokeswoman for the hospital, said the fire late Friday night was contained to one patient's room and quickly extinguished. No one else was injured, she said. The circumstances of the fire and cause of death are both under investigation, fire department spokesman Ian Brennan said. Fire investigators refused to speculate about the cause, he said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
A 20-year-old man has been charged in the death of his infant son, police confirmed Wednesday. Police have accused Dion Ware of lying about the circumstances surrounding the death Monday of Kearri Dion Ware, who was born in October. Ware, of the 300 block of E. 22nd St., first told detectives that the boy was asleep and making strange noises, and that he realized he was not breathing and performed CPR before calling 911, according to charging documents. A doctor at Johns Hopkins Children's Center told detectives, however, that there were signs of bruising on the boy, as well as fractured ribs, the records show.
NEWS
November 27, 2012
Former Gov. Robert Ehrlich is still whining about the GOP defeat in 2012 ("How Republicans can win in 2016," Nov. 25). He seems to think that next time the public will embrace the same philosophy that it rejected this year. Forget about helping the less fortunate, and insist that women who don't want to bear a child but have become pregnant - regardless of the circumstances - go through with an unwanted birth? Those ideas, among others, will only guarantee the same result four years from now. Wake up Bob, and look around before you lose again.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
Several weeks ago, media members watched a Maryland basketball scrimmage at Comcast Center. The guy we noticed -- it was hard not to -- seemed a little more advanced than his teammates. There was a confidence and a smoothness to Dez Wells. In one sequence, Wells stole the ball and banked in a layup high off the board. He followed moments later with a 3-pointer. He did it with a bandage over his left wrist and thumb to cover a cut that had come when he slid on the floor. I don't want to hype Wells too much.
NEWS
August 8, 1993
50 Years Ago* Music night was held at the weekly meeting of the Kiwanis Club. Lowell S. Ensor, chairman of the music committee, was in charge of the program. A quartet composed of Paul F. Kuhns, Paul C. Bonsack, Miles S. Reifsnider and Ralph G. Hoffman, sang several selections. -- Democratic Advocate, July 30, 1943.75 Years Ago* On Monday, 15 persons from this section were called to Westminster and fined $5.95 each for failure to have their automobile lights turned on the evening of July 1. These persons were among our most law-abiding citizens and the circumstances . . . were rather peculiar.
NEWS
By Larry Doyle | July 19, 1993
JOE McGinniss' forthcoming book about Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, "The Last Brother," would hardly be a literary milestone -- just another Kennedy book that won't be on display at the Kennedy Library -- if it weren't for one small thing.As Carolyn K. Reidy, the president of Simon & Schuster, the publisher, delicately put it, "Joe has taken biographer's license to discuss [read: make up] the thoughts that certain people might have had."Mr. McGinniss is more candid: "This is a biography, not a work of journalism."
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
Baltimore Police have launched a criminal investigation into Friday's in-custody death of a 46-year-old man in East Baltimore, who police initially said was believed to have died from choking on drugs.  Relatives of the man and eyewitnesses have come forward to say the man, identified by family as Anthony Anderson, was assaulted by police. Police confirmed that they have interviewed those witnesses, and say a preliminary autopsy shows that the man did not die from choking on drugs.  However, they the medical examiner has not yet determined whether he died from a drug overdose or some other type of injury.
NEWS
July 4, 2012
Last week's report that Baltimore's population continues to shrink was not good news but hardly surprising, given the city's history. The drop was modest compared to the residential losses Baltimore has experienced in years past, but more importantly, the U.S. Census statistics contained ample evidence of a potentially brighter future ahead. That's because many U.S. cities are on the rebound. The same Census figures that show Baltimore lost about 1,500 people in the year ending last July also revealed that more than half of the country's 51 largest metropolitan areas saw greater growth within their city limits than in their suburbs.
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