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Circuit Breaker

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NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,ORLANDO SENTINEL | June 25, 2004
WASHINGTON - A planned spacewalk ended just minutes after it began last night because of a problem with the oxygen supply to astronaut Mike Fincke's spacesuit. Four minutes after Fincke exited the International Space Station - Russian Gennady Padalka was still inside the airlock - controllers on the ground noticed that the pressure in Fincke's oxygen bottle was falling faster than expected. Controllers told Fincke to go back inside, and although the pair spent more than an hour trying to solve the problem, Russian and NASA officials decided to abort the spacewalk to fix a circuit breaker shortly after 7 p.m. EDT. Neither astronaut was ever in any danger, and officials said they expect to try the spacewalk again, no earlier than Tuesday.
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 9, 2013
A brief power outage occurred in a portion of Bel Air around 2:45 p.m. Friday, followed closely by a report of a transformer fire in the general area of the outage. The outage lasted literally for a few moments and no further power disruptions were reported. Baltimore Gas & Electric's online outage map showed fewer than five customers without power on the east side of Bel Air around 3 p.m. Those outages were reported at 2:53 p.m., according to the map. There was also an emergency radio dispatch report a short time following the outage about a person being stuck in an elevator at Southampton Middle School, on the northeast side of town.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | May 31, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The National Association of Securities Dealers said yesterday that automated trading halts should occur only if the market falls 500 points or more, considerably more than the current threshold.At present, a 250-point decline in the Dow Jones industrial average from the previous day's close triggers so-called "circuit breakers" that halt trading for an hour.The circuit breakers halt trading for two hours if the industrial average, composed of 30 blue-chip stocks, goes down 400 points.
NEWS
February 27, 2012
Maryland has two major programs designed to help prevent people from being forced out of their homes because of rising property taxes, and through extensive analysis of state records, The Sun's Jamie Smith Hopkins and Scott Calvert have documented problems with both of them. The pair reported last year that the Homestead Property Tax Credit, which limits the annual increases in homeowners' property tax bills, was fueling massive inequities in how much people were paying and was in some cases providing tens of thousands of dollars in subsidies for wealthy people who didn't need the help.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke | June 16, 1991
Digital clocks were flashing around Central Maryland yesterday afternoon after a circuit breaker blew in South Baltimore, affecting power to all Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. customers, a company spokeswoman said.No one lost power as a result of the malfunction at 3:17 p.m., but lights dimmed, computers slowed, and other electrical appliances were affected, Peggy Mulloy, the spokeswoman, said.A separate incident in the Glen Burnie area at about the same time resulted in lost power for about 1,500 customers, she said.
NEWS
March 16, 2007
County Executive John R. Leopold said yesterday that he would ask the County Council to support an amendment to a tax-relief bill to increase the savings to senior homeowners. The amendment would give county residents older than 70 the ability to seek a 30 percent bonus on a supplemental credit offered by the county to the "circuit breaker" homeowners' tax. The amendment would boost the bonus he proposed last month from 10 percent to 30 percent, increasing it by an average of $90. The tax credit would cost the county about $150,000.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - A second of four gyroscopes that help stabilize the International Space Station has stopped working, although NASA officials remain confident that the orbiting laboratory won't be seriously affected by it. The station can be operated safely with only two of the stabilizers - and if one of them fails, small thrusters can be used to control it, said Mike Suffredini, the operations manager for the station. The crew is in no danger, he said, and there is enough fuel for the thrusters on board to operate the station for at least six months.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 9, 2013
A brief power outage occurred in a portion of Bel Air around 2:45 p.m. Friday, followed closely by a report of a transformer fire in the general area of the outage. The outage lasted literally for a few moments and no further power disruptions were reported. Baltimore Gas & Electric's online outage map showed fewer than five customers without power on the east side of Bel Air around 3 p.m. Those outages were reported at 2:53 p.m., according to the map. There was also an emergency radio dispatch report a short time following the outage about a person being stuck in an elevator at Southampton Middle School, on the northeast side of town.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | December 16, 2006
The household's Christmas tree, a towering Fraser fir from Gil's Garage in Ruxton, had been secured in a no-nonsense tree stand. Green and red bulbs, the same multicolor lighting pattern that graces Baltimore's Washington Monument, were glowing on its branches. The Metropolitan Museum of Art angel was perched at its top. All was calm, all was bright. Then the lights went out. The circuit powering the front hallway and living room, where the Christmas tree resided, had stopped working. The tree blacked out after my wife turned on the vacuum cleaner.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | April 9, 2006
After an earful of he-said, she-said in a long-running rent court case, Baltimore City District Court Judge Emanuel Brown took the simplest route to the truth. Which is to say, he did something that hardly ever happens in American jurisprudence. He got off the bench and found out for himself. Brown adjourned court and headed for Cherry Hill Homes, a public housing complex that is home to Maria Parker. Parker has been suing the city's housing authority since 2004, claiming that it has failed to make needed repairs to the townhouse she shares with her five children.
NEWS
March 16, 2007
County Executive John R. Leopold said yesterday that he would ask the County Council to support an amendment to a tax-relief bill to increase the savings to senior homeowners. The amendment would give county residents older than 70 the ability to seek a 30 percent bonus on a supplemental credit offered by the county to the "circuit breaker" homeowners' tax. The amendment would boost the bonus he proposed last month from 10 percent to 30 percent, increasing it by an average of $90. The tax credit would cost the county about $150,000.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | December 16, 2006
The household's Christmas tree, a towering Fraser fir from Gil's Garage in Ruxton, had been secured in a no-nonsense tree stand. Green and red bulbs, the same multicolor lighting pattern that graces Baltimore's Washington Monument, were glowing on its branches. The Metropolitan Museum of Art angel was perched at its top. All was calm, all was bright. Then the lights went out. The circuit powering the front hallway and living room, where the Christmas tree resided, had stopped working. The tree blacked out after my wife turned on the vacuum cleaner.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | April 9, 2006
After an earful of he-said, she-said in a long-running rent court case, Baltimore City District Court Judge Emanuel Brown took the simplest route to the truth. Which is to say, he did something that hardly ever happens in American jurisprudence. He got off the bench and found out for himself. Brown adjourned court and headed for Cherry Hill Homes, a public housing complex that is home to Maria Parker. Parker has been suing the city's housing authority since 2004, claiming that it has failed to make needed repairs to the townhouse she shares with her five children.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,ORLANDO SENTINEL | June 25, 2004
WASHINGTON - A planned spacewalk ended just minutes after it began last night because of a problem with the oxygen supply to astronaut Mike Fincke's spacesuit. Four minutes after Fincke exited the International Space Station - Russian Gennady Padalka was still inside the airlock - controllers on the ground noticed that the pressure in Fincke's oxygen bottle was falling faster than expected. Controllers told Fincke to go back inside, and although the pair spent more than an hour trying to solve the problem, Russian and NASA officials decided to abort the spacewalk to fix a circuit breaker shortly after 7 p.m. EDT. Neither astronaut was ever in any danger, and officials said they expect to try the spacewalk again, no earlier than Tuesday.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - A second of four gyroscopes that help stabilize the International Space Station has stopped working, although NASA officials remain confident that the orbiting laboratory won't be seriously affected by it. The station can be operated safely with only two of the stabilizers - and if one of them fails, small thrusters can be used to control it, said Mike Suffredini, the operations manager for the station. The crew is in no danger, he said, and there is enough fuel for the thrusters on board to operate the station for at least six months.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2003
For customers in Maryland and neighboring areas, the system worked. The most widespread blackout in the nation's history, which darkened parts of the Northeast and Midwest as well as Canada last evening, didn't spread much farther south thanks to circuit breakers in the multi-state power grid that carries electricity to consumers between New Jersey and Virginia. The exact cause of the blackout remained unknown last night, although it was believed to have been triggered by a "massive disturbance" in northern New York or Ottawa, according to the head of PJM Interconnection.
NEWS
February 27, 2012
Maryland has two major programs designed to help prevent people from being forced out of their homes because of rising property taxes, and through extensive analysis of state records, The Sun's Jamie Smith Hopkins and Scott Calvert have documented problems with both of them. The pair reported last year that the Homestead Property Tax Credit, which limits the annual increases in homeowners' property tax bills, was fueling massive inequities in how much people were paying and was in some cases providing tens of thousands of dollars in subsidies for wealthy people who didn't need the help.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | July 20, 1996
NEW YORK -- The Securities and Exchange Commission yesterday approved a plan to shorten U.S. stock exchange trading halts that would be imposed if markets fall steeply.Under the new rule, the New York Stock Exchange, the Nasdaq stock market, the American Stock Exchange and other U.S. exchanges would halt trading for half an hour if the Dow Jones industrial average falls 250 points.If the Dow falls by 400 points, trading would be halted for an hour.The so-called "circuit breakers" rule -- established in 1990 in the wake of the October 1987 stock market crash -- originally called for a one-hour halt with a 250-point drop and a two-hour halt with a 400-point drop.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 11, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Securities and Exchange Commission has approved new "circuit-breakers" that let stocks fall further before trading is halted and close the market for the day only in extreme declines.Starting April 15, the new market triggers generally will halt trading for an hour when the Dow Jones industrial average falls 10 percent, for two hours when the Dow falls 20 percent, and for the rest of the day when the average falls 30 percent. The rules are different if stocks plunge in the afternoon, when the plan makes it harder to stop U.S. stock trading.
NEWS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1997
Yesterday's halt in trading was intended to calm investors, but some experts said it actually did the opposite.The first close of equities trading since President Ronald Reagan was shot in 1981 came at 2: 35 p.m., when the Dow Jones industrial average had lost about 350 points. When trading resumed a half-hour later, the Dow plunged another 200 points in 25 minutes, prompting another shutdown."All it did was give people a chance to line up their sell orders," said John Boo, head of Nasdaq trading at Ferris, Baker Watts Inc. "Look how much faster it plunged after the halt than prior to the halt."
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