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Circadian Rhythms

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By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Reporter | September 23, 2005
Mention circadian rhythms, and most of us think of jet lag, sleep disorders or how tired we were after that all-night party. But researchers say that circadian clocks - which control a 24-hour cycle first documented by a French scientist in a darkened closet in 1729 - have profound effects on just about everything that walks, crawls or grows. Circadian clocks control leaf and petal movements in plants, migratory patterns of birds, the life cycles of insects and biochemical reactions in the tiniest of bacteria.
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NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | January 11, 2009
Feeling better? We're now a week past the year's latest sunrise, and Old Sol is already climbing above the eastern horizon about a minute earlier than he did on the 4th. We'll gain 12 minutes more morning sunshine by month's end, and we'll add 22 minutes in the evening. So get out there. Enjoy the increasing daylight. Rejigger your circadian rhythms. Expose your skin and try to manufacture some vitamin D.
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NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | January 11, 2009
Feeling better? We're now a week past the year's latest sunrise, and Old Sol is already climbing above the eastern horizon about a minute earlier than he did on the 4th. We'll gain 12 minutes more morning sunshine by month's end, and we'll add 22 minutes in the evening. So get out there. Enjoy the increasing daylight. Rejigger your circadian rhythms. Expose your skin and try to manufacture some vitamin D.
NEWS
March 5, 2007
CHARLES F. EHRET, 83 Expert on jet lag Charles F. Ehret, whose research into circadian rhythms in animals and humans led to a diet to combat the effects of jet lag, died Feb. 24. Mr. Ehret died of natural causes in his home in the Chicago suburb of Grayslake, Ill., his family said. In 1983, he published the book Overcoming Jet Lag with co-author Lynne Waller Scanlon. The book outlined a diet using a planned rescheduling of meal times, including types and amounts of food to be eaten to avoid jet lag. It also specified alternate days of feasting and fasting to help speed adjustment to new time zones.
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | August 21, 2006
Andrea Meredith's mice have a terrible sense of timing. "It's as if they can't tell the difference between day and night," said Meredith, a neuroscientist at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Usually, rodents roam at night and sleep all day, even if kept in total darkness. But keep Meredith's mice in the dark, and they will hop onto their exercise wheels regardless of the hour. The odd behavior is the result of a change that Meredith engineered in a microscopic structure of their brains.
NEWS
By Jeannine Stein and Jeannine Stein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 12, 2004
Exercisers looking for the best time to work out might get the most from their sessions if they hit the treadmill or gym in the late afternoon. By studying lung capacity in 4,800 men and women, researchers found that resistance in airway passages decreases as nightfall approaches. Consequently, participants were able to take in a greater amount of air - as much as 15 percent to 20 percent more than other times of the day. The participants - all residents of Long Island, N.Y., with an average age of 55 - were given hourly standard pulmonary function tests during typical workday hours, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Subjects were asked to inhale as much air as they could in one second, then exhale into a device that measures the volume of the air expelled.
NEWS
By William Hathaway and William Hathaway,HARTFORD COURANT | October 29, 2000
When assessing sick patients, many doctors do not take time to think about time, says Dr. William White. That, he adds, is a mistake. Most migraine headaches occur between 6 a.m. and noon, the worst period for asthmatics is in the early morning hours before waking, and mornings claim more heart attack victims than any other time of day. "It used to be thought that heart problems occurred at random," White said. "They are not random at all." White, a cardiologist at the University of Connecticut Health Center, is one of the leading proponents of chronobiology, a field that stresses the importance of the body's 24-hour clock, or circadian rhythms, in understanding and treating disease.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,Sun Staff | September 21, 2003
It's been more than three decades since the discovery of the body's internal clock, a sliver of the brain that regulates vital rhythmic functions like heart rate, blood pressure and hormone production. Since then, the field of chronobiology -- the study of the effects of time on life processes -- has grown, albeit slowly, into a significant area of medical research. Only in the past few years, however, have chronobiologists begun to seriously challenge the medical community to recognize the importance of body time.
NEWS
March 5, 2007
CHARLES F. EHRET, 83 Expert on jet lag Charles F. Ehret, whose research into circadian rhythms in animals and humans led to a diet to combat the effects of jet lag, died Feb. 24. Mr. Ehret died of natural causes in his home in the Chicago suburb of Grayslake, Ill., his family said. In 1983, he published the book Overcoming Jet Lag with co-author Lynne Waller Scanlon. The book outlined a diet using a planned rescheduling of meal times, including types and amounts of food to be eaten to avoid jet lag. It also specified alternate days of feasting and fasting to help speed adjustment to new time zones.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2005
Time waits for no man, particularly when you're rapidly crossing several time zones. Your body just can't keep up. Most long-distance travelers are affected by jet lag, caused by a mismatch between the external clock and their internal clocks. They get to their destination and often feel like they've been run over by a truck. They can't sleep or they feel sleepy at odd times. Perceptual skills and cognitive ability drop. Concentration goes out the window. As motivational speaker and humorist Linda Perret once said, "Jet lag is nature's way of making you look like your passport photo."
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | August 21, 2006
Andrea Meredith's mice have a terrible sense of timing. "It's as if they can't tell the difference between day and night," said Meredith, a neuroscientist at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Usually, rodents roam at night and sleep all day, even if kept in total darkness. But keep Meredith's mice in the dark, and they will hop onto their exercise wheels regardless of the hour. The odd behavior is the result of a change that Meredith engineered in a microscopic structure of their brains.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Reporter | September 23, 2005
Mention circadian rhythms, and most of us think of jet lag, sleep disorders or how tired we were after that all-night party. But researchers say that circadian clocks - which control a 24-hour cycle first documented by a French scientist in a darkened closet in 1729 - have profound effects on just about everything that walks, crawls or grows. Circadian clocks control leaf and petal movements in plants, migratory patterns of birds, the life cycles of insects and biochemical reactions in the tiniest of bacteria.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2005
Time waits for no man, particularly when you're rapidly crossing several time zones. Your body just can't keep up. Most long-distance travelers are affected by jet lag, caused by a mismatch between the external clock and their internal clocks. They get to their destination and often feel like they've been run over by a truck. They can't sleep or they feel sleepy at odd times. Perceptual skills and cognitive ability drop. Concentration goes out the window. As motivational speaker and humorist Linda Perret once said, "Jet lag is nature's way of making you look like your passport photo."
NEWS
By Jeannine Stein and Jeannine Stein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 12, 2004
Exercisers looking for the best time to work out might get the most from their sessions if they hit the treadmill or gym in the late afternoon. By studying lung capacity in 4,800 men and women, researchers found that resistance in airway passages decreases as nightfall approaches. Consequently, participants were able to take in a greater amount of air - as much as 15 percent to 20 percent more than other times of the day. The participants - all residents of Long Island, N.Y., with an average age of 55 - were given hourly standard pulmonary function tests during typical workday hours, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Subjects were asked to inhale as much air as they could in one second, then exhale into a device that measures the volume of the air expelled.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,Sun Staff | September 21, 2003
It's been more than three decades since the discovery of the body's internal clock, a sliver of the brain that regulates vital rhythmic functions like heart rate, blood pressure and hormone production. Since then, the field of chronobiology -- the study of the effects of time on life processes -- has grown, albeit slowly, into a significant area of medical research. Only in the past few years, however, have chronobiologists begun to seriously challenge the medical community to recognize the importance of body time.
NEWS
By William Hathaway and William Hathaway,HARTFORD COURANT | October 29, 2000
When assessing sick patients, many doctors do not take time to think about time, says Dr. William White. That, he adds, is a mistake. Most migraine headaches occur between 6 a.m. and noon, the worst period for asthmatics is in the early morning hours before waking, and mornings claim more heart attack victims than any other time of day. "It used to be thought that heart problems occurred at random," White said. "They are not random at all." White, a cardiologist at the University of Connecticut Health Center, is one of the leading proponents of chronobiology, a field that stresses the importance of the body's 24-hour clock, or circadian rhythms, in understanding and treating disease.
FEATURES
March 28, 1995
If you're looking for information about a variety of health and fitness topics, you might find what you're looking for in stories now available from the Sun on Demand service of The Baltimore Sun.Each story, which has appeared in The Baltimore Sun, is $2.95 plus tax. Order by calling Sun on Demand at (410) 332-6800 and asking for the article by its four-digit code.Alternative medicine, 6301Alzheimer's, 6309Box aerobics, 6314Breast cancer amongAfrican-Americans, 6316Breast cancer'sother victims, 6315Breast-feeding, 6302Broccoli asa cancer preventive, 6317Chronobiology andhuman circadian rhythms, 6308Ear infections, 6307Incontinence, 6304Lice, 6310Menopause, 6303Pelvic pain, 6305Prostate health, 6313Radial keratomy, 6306Sleep apnea, 6312Snoring andlaser surgery, 6311
NEWS
March 19, 2013
The Maryland State Medical Society recognizes the health risks of adolescent sleep deprivation and for that reason recommends Maryland adopt later start times in the state's high schools ("Md. school systems study later start times for high schools," March 11). Studies indicate that a modest delay in school start time is associated with significant improvements in adolescent alertness, mood and health. A 2010 study published in the Archives of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine offered compelling evidence for the potential benefits of adjusting school schedules to adolescents' sleep needs, circadian rhythms and developmental stage.
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