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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter | March 10, 1995
The second installment of the Cinema Sunday Series at the Charles will commence at 10 a.m. Sunday. This series features an advance look at an unreleased film, which will be introduced and then discussed afterward by a local critic or artist.Sunday's film is a documentary well-received on the film festival circuit that just may have something to do with middle-Americans being raised by nannies.As an added attraction, John Jollis, a clerk at Video Americain, will show his short film "Your Montana Vacation Tour of the World's Wonders Begin With This Coupon" and answer questions afterward.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Sarah-Violet Bliss acknowledges some frustration with fielding questions, yet again, about being a female filmmaker, about how the vast majority of movies seem to be directed by men, and about whether that will stop being the case any time soon. "I didn't realize it was going to be something I had to talk about," says Bliss, whose "Fort Tilden" is one of at least 15 women-directed features being screened at this week's 16th Maryland Film Festival. "I just thought I would talk about the movie.
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NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1995
Just after announcing plans for a second huge shopping complex in East Columbia, the Rouse Co. wants to expand its first one -- booming Snowden Square -- by opening a multiplex cinema.If approved by the county, the cinema would be one of three movie theaters in the Columbia area.And the Rouse Co.'s plans aren't limited to the cinema at Snowden Square, behind the Hechinger Home Project Center on Commerce Center Drive. It also wants to develop three adjoining parcels for warehouse, retail, entertainment or service uses.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
A child's medical device left near the AMC movie theater in White Marsh Saturday triggered a brief evacuation of the cinema, Baltimore County police said. Police spokesman Lt. Robert McCullough said police received a call around 3:30 p.m. for a report of a suspicious package. About 30 minutes later the child's parents returned and retrieved the device, which McCullough described as a nebulizer. Such devices convert liquid medicine into mist that patients can inhale. Social media users first reported being evacuated from the theater and posted pictures of police responding to the scene.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 4, 2002
The Winter 2002 season of Cinema Sundays at the Charles opens this weekend with Lantana, a thriller from director Ray Lawrence. The movie stars Barbara Hershey as psychiatrist Valerie Somers, who disappears one night; Anthony LaPaglia is Detective Leon Zat, who investigates - and whose wife has been seeing Dr. Somers. The cast also includes Geoffrey Rush. Lee Gardner, arts editor of the City Paper, will serve as host of Sunday's screening. Doors open at 9:45 a.m., and show time is 10:30 a.m. Coffee and bagels will be served.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 27, 2001
Another film festival is being added to Baltimore's burgeoning film scene, this one dedicated to African-American cinema. Captivity, a four-day festival slated for July 5-8 at the Heritage Cinema House, will showcase somewhere between 15 and 18 films either made by African-American directors or featuring predominantly black casts, says Heritage founder Michael Johnson. Noting the success of other niche-oriented festivals, such as the Jewish Film Festival and MicroCineFest, Johnson says it's time Baltimore staged a film celebration geared toward its predominantly African-American population.
FEATURES
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 30, 2005
MOSCOW - In recent years, the Russian film industry has found itself swamped by Hollywood productions, abandoned by its stalwart audience and limited mostly to making art films or gangster flicks. Now comes the film Turkish Gambit to the rescue, sabers flashing in the sunlight, hooves pounding across grassy meadows. Since it opened Feb. 22, the historical spy thriller, set on the battlefields of a 19th-century war on the Balkan peninsula, has had more than $17 million in ticket sales.
NEWS
July 1, 1998
EARLY AFRICAN-American films -- produced and distributed by black companies in competition with the Hollywood system -- are a little-known aspect of U.S. film history. And for an understandable reason. Although an estimated 500 such movies were made between 1915 and 1950, many were lost.That's why a monthlong series beginning at 8 tonight on the Turner Classic Movies network is so valuable. It devotes five consecutive Wednesday nights to 29 significant but rarely seen "race" films, including two classics by Oscar Micheaux that were long feared lost.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2003
Three thousand outdoor cinema-goers showing up to watch Cher and Nicolas Cage under a full moon in Little Italy - now that's amore. It's opening night on High, Stiles and Albemarle streets, where a free summer film festival has brought throngs to the neighborhood in beach chairs to watch Moonstruck. The weekly Friday night event, which got off the ground four years ago when the Little Italy Restaurant Association decided to give open-air cinema a try, has become a Baltimore spectacle attracting anyone who wants to watch movies and people.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach and Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2000
The Ann Arbor Film Festival is one of the best-regarded traveling festivals of independent and experimental short films in the United States. The University of Maryland, Baltimore County will play host to the festival today and tomorrow in room 306 in the Fine Arts Building. Twenty-three new films by emerging filmmakers from around the world will be presented at the festival. Screenings are at 7 p.m tonight and 6 p.m. tomorrow. Admission is $2 ($1 for students). For more information, call 410-455-2959.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
The eight-screen movie complex at Glen Burnie's Marley Station mall, closed since February, will re-open later this year under the management of Horizons Cinemas, which also operates the four-screen Rotunda Cinemas, eight-screen Beltway Movies and two-screen Pikes Theatre. Ira Miller, owner of Horizons Cinemas, said he hopes to have the Marley Station Movies 8 open by early June. His plans for the theaters, which have a combined seating capacity of about 2,000, include new seats and draperies, along with new digital projection equipment, Miller said.
NEWS
April 2, 2014
Poor Cobb Theatres and Hekemian & Co. ( "Moviegoing adds luxury," April 1). They clearly don't appreciate the "off-book" demographics of this city. What is this demographic? It's the demographic that's currently transforming Towson Town Center and Arundel Mills. It's the one that needs added police officers from Baltimore City and Maryland State Police for July 4 t h at the Inner Harbor. It's the demographic that's simply low-class with money to spend. Oh, and yes, this class comes in two colors (with all shades between)
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
The Sundance Film Festival kicks off in Park City, Utah, Jan. 16, which means a handful of LGBT-related movies will be making their premieres. Whether these flicks get picked up for distribution in theaters is another question entirely. But in the interest of being prepared, here's a look at a few of the festival's LGBT-focused offerings. "Love Is Strange": Director Ira Sachs' semi-autobiographical "Keep the Lights On" was a brutally honest film about an ill-fated gay relationship.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
Eggs, cabbage, celery, beets - not great ingredients for an omelet, perhaps, but ideal for a multimedia genre defined as "puppet cinema. " Welcome to "Planet Egg," a show taking over the Baltimore Theatre Project for the weekend with a mix of edibles, found objects, puppetry, music and live-feed video. It's the brainchild of Zvi Sahar, an Israeli-born, New Jersey-based actor, director and puppeteer. At his parents' home in Israel a few years ago, Sahar was watching his father working on a phone and his mother making sunny-side-up eggs.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | September 5, 2012
Regal Entertainment Group will open a 12-screen and IMAX movie theater this month at Waugh Chapel  Towne Centre in Gambrills, with preview events starting Monday and a Sept. 14 grand opening. The 2,200-seat Waugh Chapel Stadium 12 & IMAX will join anchors Target and Dick's Sporting Goods, which opened this year at the $275 million mixed-use project in western Anne Arundel County - the nation's largest retail project currently under construction. Wegmans is coming to the center, next to the Village at Waugh Chapel, this fall.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
Five short narrative films, on themes ranging from a modern-day urban cowboy to a scamming extraterrestrial, kicked off the 14th annual Maryland Film Festival at MICA's Brown Center Thursday night. Maryland's festival remains the only one of its kind to devote its opening night to short films — works the evening's host, salon.com film critic Andrew O'Hehir, praised as a way for filmmakers to hone their craft. The evening's fare kicked off with MFF alum Christina Choe's "I am John Wayne," a cryptic modern take on the cowboy tradition, complete with a horse, a laconic hero and a two-timing woman, all set against a Coney Island backdrop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ANN HORNADAY AND CHRIS KALTENBACH and ANN HORNADAY AND CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN FILM CRITIC; SUN STAFF | April 22, 1999
After weeks of anticipation, it's finally here: Opening night of the new Maryland Film Festival, which will unspool starting tonight at the Senator Theatre with a gala screening of Barry Levinson's home-movie documentary, "Diner Guys."But that's the easy part. "Diner Guys," which traces the lives of the men who inspired Levinson's 1982 movie "Diner" over nine years, is the only thing playing tonight (the screening will be followed by a question-and-answer session with Levinson, then with a block party at the Charles Theatre on Charles Street)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter | November 9, 1995
A Jane Austen novel forms the basis of the Sunday Cinema at the Charles presentation this Sunday at the art theater on Charles Street.Local film critic Mike Guiliano will introduce the film, which stars lTC Corin Redgrave and Fiona Shaw and has received wonderful reviews in the cities where it's opened.The Sunday Cinema offers viewers a first look at an art film as introduced before, then discussed afterward, by a local critic. The doors to the theater open at 10, and the screening begins at 10:30.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | April 27, 2012
News Roundup •••• Adam Sessler, host of G4TV's gaming flagship “X-Play,” has left the network and the long-running show. Sessler was a fixture on the network's previous incarnations, ZDTV and TechTV, having co-hosted “X-Play” with Morgan Webb for nearly a decade. [ Kotaku ] •••• A new study has found that playing “Tetris” can ease the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. It can also get you kicked out of math class if you play it too conspicuously on your TI-86 calculator.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | December 7, 2011
Martin Scorsese has made so many provocative movies over the decades that probably the only way left for him to shock an audience was to make a children's film. Yes, "Hugo" is rated PG. It's also in 3-D, meaning that this Christmas release delivers the dazzling special effects now expected in a big-budget movie. This immensely gifted director really does deliver in terms of a family-friendly movie that qualifies as a genuine gift for the holiday season. Ironically, it may be a gift more appreciated by seasoned movie buffs than by small children.
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