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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | October 30, 1993
Germano Celant, one of contemporary art's leading curators and critics, will inaugurate the Mordes Lecture in Contemporary Art at Washington's Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden tomorrow.The lectureship is sponsored by Dr. Marvin and Elayne Mordes of Baltimore, leading collectors of contemporary art who own works by Joseph Kosuth, Cindy Sherman, Christian Boltanski, Rebecca Horn, Vito Acconci, Jenny Holzer, John Baldessari and Richard Serra, among others. They have also recently promised to donate to the Hirshhorn a major work by British artist Damien Hirst, "The Asthmatic Escaped II," now on view at the museum as a promised gift.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
The well-heeled matron in Diane Arbus' 1968 photo resembles no one so much as the Muppet Miss Piggy, with her silver curls peeking out beneath a turban, oversized pearl earrings and dramatic makeup. The fur collar she wears is so white, long and fluffy, it seems about to swallow her head. "Woman with a Veil on Fifth Avenue, N.Y.C. " is unquestionably arresting — but it's merely one of 200 striking images in "Seeing Now," an exhibit at the Baltimore Museum of Art opening Sunday.
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FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | April 21, 1998
Aside from the face, the hands are the most expressive part of the human body. Anyone who doubts that need only drop in on "Collection in Context," the current photography show at University of Maryland, Baltimore County.The show includes only photographs in which hands are an important element of the picture. Among other things, these works demonstrate that hands can express the whole range of human emotions.The drooping, cigarette-holding hand in Jack Pierson's "Et Maintenant (And Now)" (1993-1994)
NEWS
July 30, 2004
Bernard M. Sherman, a retired insurance salesman and professional musician, died of heart failure Tuesday at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 85. Mr. Sherman was born in Baltimore, the son of immigrant parents from Kiev, Ukraine, and raised on Eden Street in Little Italy. His father later manufactured and sold Sherman's Coddies. He learned to play the cello in his youth, and after graduating from City College in 1937 studied at the Peabody Conservatory. After serving in the Army during World War II as a military policeman, he returned to Baltimore and performed with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in the late 1940s.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 28, 2002
What motivates the passionate collector? That is a question even the experts can't answer completely. Every collector is unique, and people collect artworks for widely varying reasons. But one thing they all have in common is an intense interest in the world around them and a desire to engage it through the objects they collect. Over the past 25 years, Eli and Edythe L. Broad of Los Angeles have assembled one of the finest collections of contemporary art in the United States. Like most collectors, the Broads were motivated as much by their passionate involvement with people and ideas as by their love of art. The commitment they made to the art of our time reflects their belief that artistic creativity is a vital element of any thriving civic community.
NEWS
July 30, 2004
Bernard M. Sherman, a retired insurance salesman and professional musician, died of heart failure Tuesday at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 85. Mr. Sherman was born in Baltimore, the son of immigrant parents from Kiev, Ukraine, and raised on Eden Street in Little Italy. His father later manufactured and sold Sherman's Coddies. He learned to play the cello in his youth, and after graduating from City College in 1937 studied at the Peabody Conservatory. After serving in the Army during World War II as a military policeman, he returned to Baltimore and performed with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in the late 1940s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
The well-heeled matron in Diane Arbus' 1968 photo resembles no one so much as the Muppet Miss Piggy, with her silver curls peeking out beneath a turban, oversized pearl earrings and dramatic makeup. The fur collar she wears is so white, long and fluffy, it seems about to swallow her head. "Woman with a Veil on Fifth Avenue, N.Y.C. " is unquestionably arresting — but it's merely one of 200 striking images in "Seeing Now," an exhibit at the Baltimore Museum of Art opening Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | November 23, 2003
Over the last 20 years, artworks that explore issues of racial and gender identity have emerged as a significant genre in contemporary art, as women, gays and people of color all have sought to redefine their relationship to America's democratic ideal. Curiously, however, one group remains largely invisible in the art that takes ethnic and racial identity as its subject: white people. Why this should be so is something of a paradox: While people of color traditionally have been defined in terms of their not being white, the definition of whiteness itself has no meaning outside its relationship to nonwhiteness.
NEWS
July 30, 2004
On Tuesday, July 27, 2004, BERNARD SHERMAN, beloved husband of the late Miriam Sherman (nee Zafren); devoted father of Jay Sherman of Baltimore, MD, and the late Cindy Sherman; and devoted brother Ceil Randall and Louis Sherman, both of Baltimore. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS HOME, 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Thursday, July 29, at 1 P.M. Interment Anshe Emunah Aitz Chaim Congregation Cemetery, Washington Boulevard. Please omit flowers. The family has directed all contributions to Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, c/o Development, 1212 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, MD (21201-5545)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer | March 18, 2004
Contemporary prints The Baltimore Museum of Art presents its biennial print fair this weekend. The Baltimore Fair for Contemporary Prints and New Editions, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, is an opportunity to peruse and purchase the works of emerging and established artists. Tickets, $12 per person, include museum admission. Students with valid ID get in free. The BMA is at 10 Art Museum Drive. Call 410-396-7100 or visit www.artbma.org. Art at Goucher Goucher alumna Lois Tarlow will exhibit her recent works at the college.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | November 23, 2003
Over the last 20 years, artworks that explore issues of racial and gender identity have emerged as a significant genre in contemporary art, as women, gays and people of color all have sought to redefine their relationship to America's democratic ideal. Curiously, however, one group remains largely invisible in the art that takes ethnic and racial identity as its subject: white people. Why this should be so is something of a paradox: While people of color traditionally have been defined in terms of their not being white, the definition of whiteness itself has no meaning outside its relationship to nonwhiteness.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 28, 2002
What motivates the passionate collector? That is a question even the experts can't answer completely. Every collector is unique, and people collect artworks for widely varying reasons. But one thing they all have in common is an intense interest in the world around them and a desire to engage it through the objects they collect. Over the past 25 years, Eli and Edythe L. Broad of Los Angeles have assembled one of the finest collections of contemporary art in the United States. Like most collectors, the Broads were motivated as much by their passionate involvement with people and ideas as by their love of art. The commitment they made to the art of our time reflects their belief that artistic creativity is a vital element of any thriving civic community.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | April 21, 1998
Aside from the face, the hands are the most expressive part of the human body. Anyone who doubts that need only drop in on "Collection in Context," the current photography show at University of Maryland, Baltimore County.The show includes only photographs in which hands are an important element of the picture. Among other things, these works demonstrate that hands can express the whole range of human emotions.The drooping, cigarette-holding hand in Jack Pierson's "Et Maintenant (And Now)" (1993-1994)
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | October 30, 1993
Germano Celant, one of contemporary art's leading curators and critics, will inaugurate the Mordes Lecture in Contemporary Art at Washington's Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden tomorrow.The lectureship is sponsored by Dr. Marvin and Elayne Mordes of Baltimore, leading collectors of contemporary art who own works by Joseph Kosuth, Cindy Sherman, Christian Boltanski, Rebecca Horn, Vito Acconci, Jenny Holzer, John Baldessari and Richard Serra, among others. They have also recently promised to donate to the Hirshhorn a major work by British artist Damien Hirst, "The Asthmatic Escaped II," now on view at the museum as a promised gift.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 14, 2005
Postmodernism has put photography in the somewhat uncomfortable position of having been the most volatile of all the arts of the past three decades. It has become a bridge between the modernist project of the early 20th century and the reaction against modernism that set in during the 1970s. Among the former may be counted such "straight" photographers as Eugene Atget, Walker Evans and Henri Cartier-Bresson; the latter would include Cindy Sherman, Sherrie Levine and Richard Prince. Postmodernists reject photography's claim to truthfulness.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2008
More than 70 organizations will offer more than 300 free events around the city this month. In its third year, Free Fall Baltimore seeks to introduce area residents to the city's cultural opportunities and make art, music and theater more accessible. There will be chances to see live performances, museum exhibits and film festivals at some of the city's premier institutions. There will also be hands-on activities such as glass-blowing and photography workshops. See the schedule for Free Fall Baltimore at baltimoresun.
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