Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCincinnati Chili
IN THE NEWS

Cincinnati Chili

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
Some ass at Deadspin has had the presumption to describe Cincinnati chili as " the worst regional foodstuff in America or anywhere else. "  We can only deplore an impoverished palate unable to appreciate the finest of fast foods, and partly on odd and illegitimate grounds.  The writer thinks the less of Cincinnati chili because it is spread over spaghetti noodles, and because it was invented in the 1920s by Greeks who had the temerity...
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
Some ass at Deadspin has had the presumption to describe Cincinnati chili as " the worst regional foodstuff in America or anywhere else. "  We can only deplore an impoverished palate unable to appreciate the finest of fast foods, and partly on odd and illegitimate grounds.  The writer thinks the less of Cincinnati chili because it is spread over spaghetti noodles, and because it was invented in the 1920s by Greeks who had the temerity...
Advertisement
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
I gather that there is some brouhaha today about a fast-food chain that serves mediocre fried chicken. (The One True Fried Chicken was made in an iron skillet by my mother and grandmother, and anything else is a pale and shoddy imitation.) Really, if you are going to eat fast food, Cincinnati chili is a far more satisfactory dish. Unfortunately, Skyline has no outlets in Baltimore, but I have a recipe for one variant of Cincinnati chili from the late Bob Johnson, my first news editor at The Cincinnati Enquirer , and I am willing to impart the secret to you. But first, a caution.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
I gather that there is some brouhaha today about a fast-food chain that serves mediocre fried chicken. (The One True Fried Chicken was made in an iron skillet by my mother and grandmother, and anything else is a pale and shoddy imitation.) Really, if you are going to eat fast food, Cincinnati chili is a far more satisfactory dish. Unfortunately, Skyline has no outlets in Baltimore, but I have a recipe for one variant of Cincinnati chili from the late Bob Johnson, my first news editor at The Cincinnati Enquirer , and I am willing to impart the secret to you. But first, a caution.
FEATURES
By Carleton Jones | January 12, 1992
If the gang is going to descend on you the night of Jan. 26 for the annual Super Bowl extravaganza, you needn't panic.Keep things simple and the food part of the show, at least, will be a snap. Why? Because you'll make everything in advance: chill the beverages, the main event and dessert a day ahead and at the last minute heat up the main dish -- a casserole of genuine Ohio River five-part chili.Bowl buffets have a way of focusing attention on looking, not conversing, so the appetizer should be passable, a plate snack that doesn't interfere with looking at the tube.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1996
Strawberries are wonderful in pies, desserts and on cereals. But have you tried them in soup? Yes indeed, strawberry soup.A memory sails forth for Florence D. Baris of Baltimore when she recalls the cruise she took and the delicious strawberry soup she was served. She wants the recipe.Chef Gilles Syglowski chose one from Paige Henry of Owensboro, Ky.Henry's strawberry soupMakes 6 1-cup servings2 pounds vanilla-flavored yogurt1 pint strawberries, cleaned and stemmed1 cup half-and-halfjuice of one orange (about 1/3 -cup)
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2002
CINCINNATI - The towering platters arrive on the arm of a chatty waitress named Mary Lou. Atop each heap stands a mound of shredded cheese. Underneath the cheddar lurk equally thick strata of chili and, of course, spaghetti. The two burly mechanics who have driven an hour to eat at Camp Washington Chili dive fork-first into their big breakfasts. "This," declares Tom Freudenberg, coming up for air, "is better than scrambled eggs." Day or night, you can get chili all over this region, from mom-and-pop parlors to chains that have sprouted like McDonald's.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 1998
Hard Times tries hard to appeal to the varied tastes of American chili lovers. That includes the Texas purists who want all meat and no beans, the spaghetti-loving nonconformists of Cincinnati, and healthy eaters from all parts who prefer a meatless variety. There's even a seasonal turkey chili for those who can think about eating turkey after today's meal.Started by brothers Fred and Jim Parker, this chili-parlor chain is franchised by the American Chili Management Corp. There now are seven restaurants in Maryland and Virginia, including the newest outpost in Columbia, which opened in June.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 2000
The Hard Times Cafe seems as though it belongs in Depression-era Oklahoma, not in a Columbia office park. The furniture is purposely rough-hewn, and the walls are decorated with black-and-white cowboy prints, Texas flags, riding gear and other mementos of a dustier time. Country music clops along from an old-fashioned jukebox. Of course, there's nothing the least bit authentic about the spurs-and-burrs motif. The Hard Times Cafe was founded in Alexandria, Va., in 1980 by Fred and Jim Parker.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | February 13, 1994
We drank beer, smoked cigars and sipped bourbon. Despite appearances, this was not a gathering of retrogrades. Well, maybe it was, but we were retrogrades with scoring sheets and pencils. That made us connoisseurs.The occasion was a beer, bourbon and cigar bash held at Cafe Tattoo, a restaurant, and yes, adjoining tattoo parlor on the 4800 block of Belair Road in Northeast Baltimore. About 30 participants forked over $20 for tickets to the tasting. I was happy to be one of them.I have been a fan of Cafe Tattoo ever since I tasted the chili made by Elayne Catalano, who, along with her husband, Rick, presides over the establishment.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2002
CINCINNATI - The towering platters arrive on the arm of a chatty waitress named Mary Lou. Atop each heap stands a mound of shredded cheese. Underneath the cheddar lurk equally thick strata of chili and, of course, spaghetti. The two burly mechanics who have driven an hour to eat at Camp Washington Chili dive fork-first into their big breakfasts. "This," declares Tom Freudenberg, coming up for air, "is better than scrambled eggs." Day or night, you can get chili all over this region, from mom-and-pop parlors to chains that have sprouted like McDonald's.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 1998
Hard Times tries hard to appeal to the varied tastes of American chili lovers. That includes the Texas purists who want all meat and no beans, the spaghetti-loving nonconformists of Cincinnati, and healthy eaters from all parts who prefer a meatless variety. There's even a seasonal turkey chili for those who can think about eating turkey after today's meal.Started by brothers Fred and Jim Parker, this chili-parlor chain is franchised by the American Chili Management Corp. There now are seven restaurants in Maryland and Virginia, including the newest outpost in Columbia, which opened in June.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1996
Strawberries are wonderful in pies, desserts and on cereals. But have you tried them in soup? Yes indeed, strawberry soup.A memory sails forth for Florence D. Baris of Baltimore when she recalls the cruise she took and the delicious strawberry soup she was served. She wants the recipe.Chef Gilles Syglowski chose one from Paige Henry of Owensboro, Ky.Henry's strawberry soupMakes 6 1-cup servings2 pounds vanilla-flavored yogurt1 pint strawberries, cleaned and stemmed1 cup half-and-halfjuice of one orange (about 1/3 -cup)
FEATURES
By Carleton Jones | January 12, 1992
If the gang is going to descend on you the night of Jan. 26 for the annual Super Bowl extravaganza, you needn't panic.Keep things simple and the food part of the show, at least, will be a snap. Why? Because you'll make everything in advance: chill the beverages, the main event and dessert a day ahead and at the last minute heat up the main dish -- a casserole of genuine Ohio River five-part chili.Bowl buffets have a way of focusing attention on looking, not conversing, so the appetizer should be passable, a plate snack that doesn't interfere with looking at the tube.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | March 15, 1995
This simple, 15-minute chili actually has a green tint given by the green salsa which is available in many supermarkets these days. Verde, (pronounced vare-day), means green in Spanish and it is also the name given to Mexican-style stews that are based on the green tomatillo and green chilies rather than the red tomato and red chilies. A verde often uses pork as the meat. If desired, take the theme a little further and, instead of using red meat, use a mild poultry such as ground turkey or ground chicken.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | February 4, 2009
Cookbook author Jane Butel has campaigned for years to have chili declared America's national dish. She failed only by degree. Chili, lovingly known as the "bowl of red," is certainly the national dish of winter. "What's not to like?" asked Butel, author of the new Chili Madness: A Passionate Cookbook, which updates her best-seller of 30 years ago. "It is easy to make. It comes in one pot. It improves with time and reheating. It makes enough for a crowd. And it is exciting to the human taste buds."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.