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By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | June 10, 2009
Susan Hill dislikes cilantro, and not just a little. "I just hate it," says Hill, 36, an Annapolis stay-at-home mom. "Oh, I do." The fresh herb Hill detests is also known as coriander and Chinese parsley. It looks a lot like Italian flat-leaf parsley. And good thing. Cilantro has so many enemies that it could use a couple of aliases and a way to pass for something else in the herb garden. Once an exotic flavor confined to Mexican, Asian and Indian cooking, cilantro turns up today even in white-bread American restaurants.
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By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
My friend Meredith, who teaches power yoga and is a health fanatic, made this salad for an employee party at the YMCA where she works, and it was voted best recipe. It's both healthy (lots of red and orange superfood peppers!) and delicious -- and the recipe makes a vat of salad, so it's great for a party. The recipe comes from Clean Eating magazine. It called for frozen corn, but I've changed that to fresh. Clean Eating claimed that it took 20 minutes to make this. It took me a whole lot longer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | August 2, 2011
There's more to summer cocktails than mojitos or margaritas; sure they get the job done, but they aren't nearly as refreshing as Mr. Rain's sinfully made Eve's Habit. The Funhouse, a culinary wonderland atop the American Visionary Art Museum , loves to serve patrons drinks as innovative and quirky as their artistic digs. I loved Eve's Habit, served as part of a flight of handcrafted cocktails called The Garden Variety. As the title suggests, ingredients are inspired by fresh, seasonal produce: red bell pepper-infused gin, fresh citruses and herbs, organic rum infused with hibiscus, ginger and cardamom.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | August 2, 2011
There's more to summer cocktails than mojitos or margaritas; sure they get the job done, but they aren't nearly as refreshing as Mr. Rain's sinfully made Eve's Habit. The Funhouse, a culinary wonderland atop the American Visionary Art Museum , loves to serve patrons drinks as innovative and quirky as their artistic digs. I loved Eve's Habit, served as part of a flight of handcrafted cocktails called The Garden Variety. As the title suggests, ingredients are inspired by fresh, seasonal produce: red bell pepper-infused gin, fresh citruses and herbs, organic rum infused with hibiscus, ginger and cardamom.
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 29, 2004
Skirt steak makes me think of France and plenty of pommes frites, or the American West with a kiss of mesquite, but I never thought of skirt steak, or any beef for that matter, in connection with Puerto Rico. But there I was during a recent trip, eating skirt steak and loving it. Perhaps it was the relative tenderness of the beef, or perhaps it was the sofrito, a savory blend of pureed peppers, onions, cilantro and garlic used in the Caribbean as a seasoning base or marinade. This medley of flavors brought out a delectable smokiness in the beef.
FEATURES
By Steven Raichlen and Steven Raichlen,Contributing Writer | August 12, 1992
Ten years ago, few Americans had ever heard of or tasted cilantro. Today, progressive cooks can't seem to cook without it. This pungent green herb has been turning up in everything from salsas to salads and stir-fries. Once available only at ethnic markets, it has crept into restaurants and supermarkets.Cilantro (pronounced see-LAN-tro) may be a relative newcomer to the United States, but it has long been a mainstay of many of the world's great cuisines. The pungent leaf is a cornerstone of Mexican cooking.
FEATURES
By Seattle Times | January 18, 1995
The following light-eating recipe, is a delicious new way to use boneless chicken breasts from "Cooking Under Wraps" by Nicole Routhier.Thai-Style Fajitas6 servingsCHICKEN:4 boneless and skinless chicken breast halves (about 1 1/4 pounds)1 medium clove garlic, peeled and minced1 medium shallot, peeled and mincedgrated peel of 1 lime2 tablespoons lime juice1 tablespoon fish sauce1/2 teaspoon sesame oil2 teaspoons brown sugar2 tablespoons minced cilantro6 flour tortillasPICKLED VEGETABLES:1/2 cup rice vinegar2 tablespoons sugar1 tablespoon fish sauce1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes1 large English cucumber, peeled, halved, seeded and cut into 1/4 -inch slices1 large carrot, peeled, halved and cut into 1/8 -inch thick slices1/2 medium red onion, very thinly sliced2 tablespoons minced cilantroCut chicken into very thin strips.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | May 1, 2008
From our first taste of sweet, soft mussels, garlicky and sprinkled with chopped tomato, onion and cilantro, we knew we were in good hands at Mango's Grill. The small restaurant, with its overly bright plastic tablecloths and piles of what looks like folded laundry by the front door, doesn't give a great first impression. But it is a diamond in the rough. -- Poor:]
FEATURES
May 15, 1991
Canned salmon, a staple in many cupboards, takes on a new air of sophistication with the simple addition of fresh grated ginger, aromatic cilantro and savory green onions. The salmon mixture is formed into small patties and lightly sauteed to a golden brown and then presented on a bed of mixed salad greens in a sweet and tangy orange-ginger vinaigrette. This recipe is from the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute.Pacific Rim Salmon1 can (15 1/2 ounces) salmon1 cup dry bread crumbs1/2 cup sliced green onions2 tablespoons chopped cilantro1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger3 egg whitesAdditional dry bread crumbs, for coatingVegetable oil, for frying6 to 8 cups mixed salad greensOrange-ginger vinaigrette, recipe follows.
NEWS
By RENEE ENNA and RENEE ENNA,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 29, 2004
Turkey burgers get a boost from Asian-inspired ingredients and tropical fruit. Peanut sauce, a familiar ingredient in many Asian noodle dishes, has a presence here. But to keep things moving, peanut butter is used as a quick substitute for the harder-to-achieve sauce. (Natural peanut butter is best, but any variety will work here, creamy or chunky.) Instead of ketchup and mustard, the burger gets dressed with a quick spread made with lime juice, mango, honey and mayonnaise. Tips: Ground beef or chicken can substitute for the turkey.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jasmine Wiggins | May 3, 2011
This is the kind of salsa I’m used to having at home in Arizona. It uses fresh ingredients and none of it’s pureed or cooked. I used to get into arguments with my Texas boyfriend about what made the perfect salsa. (He would secretly cook and puree my salsa when I wasn’t around.) Well, I think my  version is better than his. Of course.   Salsa Fresca About 1lb fresh tomatoes 1/4 C cilantro 1/4 C red onion 1 medium jalapeno (remove the seeds or start with half if you like milder salsa)
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | December 20, 2009
The dual restaurant space at 1300 Bank St. near Little Italy always struck me as odd. When it opened, it had a Thai restaurant, Lemongrass, and a pan-Asian restaurant, Tsunami, so close together that they shared a kitchen. Lemongrass took off, but its sister restaurant didn't - probably because it was perceived as simply a more expensive version of the first place. The new owners of the restaurants (who also own Red Star in Fells Point) have taken a different approach. They have turned the pan-Asian restaurant into Diablita Cantina, a casual Mexican place that's a step up from the usual tacos-and-fajitas factory.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN REIMER | August 6, 2009
It is August in the garden, and the energy of spring has evaporated like the dew - for the garden and the gardener. What looked so fresh and promising in May looks scraggly and wilted now, and the punishing heat and drought of late summer in the Mid-Atlantic saps the will to do anything about it. If I wait a little longer, the gardener tells herself, it will be time for mums and this awkward phase in the garden cycle will be forgotten. In spring, we haunt the garden centers and purchase what is blooming at the moment, doubling down our investment in early-season color.
FEATURES
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | June 10, 2009
Susan Hill dislikes cilantro, and not just a little. "I just hate it," says Hill, 36, an Annapolis stay-at-home mom. "Oh, I do." The fresh herb Hill detests is also known as coriander and Chinese parsley. It looks a lot like Italian flat-leaf parsley. And good thing. Cilantro has so many enemies that it could use a couple of aliases and a way to pass for something else in the herb garden. Once an exotic flavor confined to Mexican, Asian and Indian cooking, cilantro turns up today even in white-bread American restaurants.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | May 1, 2008
From our first taste of sweet, soft mussels, garlicky and sprinkled with chopped tomato, onion and cilantro, we knew we were in good hands at Mango's Grill. The small restaurant, with its overly bright plastic tablecloths and piles of what looks like folded laundry by the front door, doesn't give a great first impression. But it is a diamond in the rough. -- Poor:]
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | March 12, 2008
Quesadillas can be as fancy as you want them to be, but the simplest are often the best. For me, nothing beats two toasted flour tortillas sandwiching a filling of melted cheese and a little bowl of salsa on the side for occasional dipping. Mild asadero, a Mexican cow's milk cheese, is a great melter and would make for a good filling. If you want more of a flavor zap, consider a fine Wisconsin cheddar or even a French mimolette. You also can microwave the quesadillas: Cook on high until the cheese melts.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | September 12, 2007
The secret to Puerto Rican cuisine is the distinctive sofrito. The Puerto Rican version is made with culantro (saw-leaf coriander, a relative of cilantro) and ajies dulces, sweet cooking peppers. I adapted today's recipe from Joel Rodriguez, executive chef at San Juan's Ajili Mojili, celebrated for serving authentic Puerto Rican cuisine, "cocina criolla." Puerto Rican-Style Chicken and Rice Makes 2 servings 1/2 medium green bell pepper, seeded and cut into cubes 4 medium garlic cloves, peeled 1/2 small onion, peeled and quartered 1 small tomato, cored and cut into quarters 1/2 cup cilantro leaves, plus 2 tablespoons for garnish (divided use)
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Evening Sun Staff | January 8, 1992
POTATOES ARE THE star in this one-dish meal with South American overtones. Serve this giant potato salad with a variety of different condiments.The Potato Board is offering a free brochure with six recipes from around the world. Send a stamped, self-addressed business-size envelope to: The Celebrated Potato, 1385 South Colorado Boulevard, Suite 512, Denver, Co. 80222.South American Potato Platter6 cups chicken broth2 pounds potatoes, cut into 1-inch chunks2 lemons, halved3 fresh or canned jalapeno peppers, quartered lengthwise1 tablespoon ground cumin1/2 pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts1 small bunch cilantro2 cups diced tomatoes1/4 cup fresh or canned diced mild green chiles1 tablespoon chopped cilantro1 tablespoon white wine vinegar1/4 teaspoon each salt and pepperTo prepare potatoes and chicken, in large saucepan or Dutch oven combine broth, potatoes, lemons, jalapeno peppers and cumin.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | September 12, 2007
The secret to Puerto Rican cuisine is the distinctive sofrito. The Puerto Rican version is made with culantro (saw-leaf coriander, a relative of cilantro) and ajies dulces, sweet cooking peppers. I adapted today's recipe from Joel Rodriguez, executive chef at San Juan's Ajili Mojili, celebrated for serving authentic Puerto Rican cuisine, "cocina criolla." Puerto Rican-Style Chicken and Rice Makes 2 servings 1/2 medium green bell pepper, seeded and cut into cubes 4 medium garlic cloves, peeled 1/2 small onion, peeled and quartered 1 small tomato, cored and cut into quarters 1/2 cup cilantro leaves, plus 2 tablespoons for garnish (divided use)
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,Chicago Tribune | July 11, 2007
Poblanos are among my favorite chiles and I use them in many dishes, even those that don't have a Mexican heritage - pastas, casseroles, stews. The dark-green chile successfully lends its medium-spicy flavor to all of them. I also like to top grilled meats with strips of poblanos that have been quickly sauteed in olive oil. This recipe for flank steak uses them in combination with red onion slices for a great, simple topping that matches the earthiness of the steak. If you have more time, consider grilling the whole poblanos first until they start to blacken on all sides, then cut them into strips.
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