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NEWS
January 11, 2005
Dr. S. Paul Ehrlich Jr., 72, who served as acting surgeon general for four years under Presidents Richard M. Nixon, Gerald R. Ford and Jimmy Carter and lobbied against cigarette smoking, died Thursday in Delray Beach, Fla. In 1994, he joined other surgeons general in demanding more stringent controls on tobacco on the 30th anniversary of the first surgeon general's report on smoking and disease.
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NEWS
June 23, 2014
The death one week ago of baseball's Tony Gwynn, who is often remembered by Baltimoreans for his induction in the Hall of Fame in 2007 with Cal Ripken Jr. , called attention to the dangers of smokeless tobacco. The former San Diego Padres batting champ suffered from oral cancer and blamed two decades of chewing tobacco for his plight. As well-publicized as the health risks of tobacco may be in the U.S., the focus has been placed primarily on the dangers of cigarette smoking. That's understandable given the cigarettes are by far the most popular tobacco product.
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HEALTH
By Laura Barnhardt Cech, For The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Although hookah lounges are becoming more popular, smoking flavored tobacco through water pipes creates hazardous concentrations of indoor air pollution, according to a new study from the Institute for Global Tobacco Control at the Johns Hopkins University's Bloomberg School of Public Health. In fact, airborne particulate matter and carbon monoxide levels exceeded those found in restaurants and bars that allowed cigarette smoking, the study found. "There is a mistaken notion that because the tobacco smoke is drawn through the water, it's somehow cleaner or not as bad," Patrick Breysse, a professor in the department of environmental health sciences and the study's senior author, said in an interview.
HEALTH
By Laura Barnhardt Cech, For The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Although hookah lounges are becoming more popular, smoking flavored tobacco through water pipes creates hazardous concentrations of indoor air pollution, according to a new study from the Institute for Global Tobacco Control at the Johns Hopkins University's Bloomberg School of Public Health. In fact, airborne particulate matter and carbon monoxide levels exceeded those found in restaurants and bars that allowed cigarette smoking, the study found. "There is a mistaken notion that because the tobacco smoke is drawn through the water, it's somehow cleaner or not as bad," Patrick Breysse, a professor in the department of environmental health sciences and the study's senior author, said in an interview.
NEWS
July 13, 2012
In regard to your editorial recommending Congress raise the cigarette tax ("Where there's smoke…" July 9), just observe how motorists have limited their auto use when gas was almost $4 per gallon - none at all. Or just look in Baltimore's alleys, streets and sidewalks to see how cigarettes are now smoked right down to the filter to save money, making the experience more toxic than ever. Or see how more and more people smoke outdoors and in their homes because smoking is not allowed indoors in all places.
NEWS
September 11, 1995
Smoking warsThe Aug. 27 article, "Smoking wars hit the stores," is so glaringly off the mark that one wonders if anyone is awake down there. Featured are two tobacconists, one in Towson which is going out of business because it lost its lease and one in downtown Baltimore which is flourishing. The inference is that the controversy over cigarette smoking is responsible for the former, and one is left to speculate upon the contrasting success of the latter.Tobacco shops, which specialize in cigars and pipes, have little to do with cigarette smoking; they serve a different market and most seem to be flourishing.
NEWS
September 1, 1995
FROM an editorial in the Los Angeles Times:To judge from Philip Morris' sanctimonious reaction to extracting a narrow apology from ABC News for a report on alleged nicotine spiking of cigarettes, one would hardly guess the company purveys products that cause death and disease. . . . The company took out full-page ads in major newspapers, headlined "Apology Accepted" and implying that the press is often wrong about the dangers of tobacco. "Fairness and a sincere interest in the truth" are all that is wanted by Philip Morris, which still disputes the obvious truth that cigarettes cause lung cancer, heart disease and other ills.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | April 20, 1993
My boyfriend has started using chewing tobacco. Every time I ask him to stop, he argues that it's safer than cigarettes. How safe is it?Your boyfriend is not unlike many other adolescents and adults who view smokeless tobacco use as "the lesser of two evils."But in reality, users of smokeless tobacco are trading one kind of cancer risk for another. An estimated 30,000 new cancers of the mouth will be detected this year, most of them due to either smoking or smokeless tobacco use.Spit tobacco, moist tobacco and/or snuff (which is not sniffed but placed in the mouth)
NEWS
March 27, 1991
There is great irony in the fact that cigarette makers, after having resisted for years the placing of mandatory warnings on their products, now seek to use those very labels to escape liability for the immense damage that smoking causes.Monday the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to decide whether the presence of the warning, first put on cigarette packages 25 years ago, sufficiently forewarns smokers that they are endangering their lives by smoking.It is a difficult question, to be sure. It seems reasonable that in today's climate, if a reasonably well-informed adult chooses to begin smoking, then that person can hardly hold the cigarette manufacturer responsible for any resulting damage to his or her health.
NEWS
February 23, 1997
SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE is overwhelming that cigarette smoking is detrimental to your health. Seven thousand six hundred Marylanders will die this year because of their smoking habits. Taxpayers will pay $123 million in Medicaid costs in Maryland to provide medical treatment for those with tobacco-related illnesses. The total annual health-care bill for smoking-related illnesses in Maryland is $4 billion.Smoking is by far Maryland's No. 1 killer. Smokers are five times more likely to turn into binge drinkers and 15 times more likely to turn to marijuana.
NEWS
July 13, 2012
In regard to your editorial recommending Congress raise the cigarette tax ("Where there's smoke…" July 9), just observe how motorists have limited their auto use when gas was almost $4 per gallon - none at all. Or just look in Baltimore's alleys, streets and sidewalks to see how cigarettes are now smoked right down to the filter to save money, making the experience more toxic than ever. Or see how more and more people smoke outdoors and in their homes because smoking is not allowed indoors in all places.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | May 18, 2009
From a distance, it looks like Tal Broustin is lighting up a cigarette, right in the middle of Arundel Mills, a clear no-no. And he is trying to get others to take drags, too, luring passersby to his kiosk by asking if they are trying to quit smoking. Up close, it is clear that Broustin is taking puffs not from an actual cigarette, but from a battery-powered gadget designed to look like the real thing. Called an "e-cigarette," or electronic cigarette, it contains no tobacco, gives off no smoke but instead is a nicotine delivery device that gives off heated water vapor.
NEWS
September 14, 2007
Tobacco tax hike cuts costs, saves lives The governor and our legislators should support the proposed $1-a-pack increase in the state tobacco tax as a way to expand health care coverage and reduce the rate of death and disease associated with cigarette smoking ("Cutting the deficit with smoke," Sept. 8). Maryland's current tax rate on cigarettes is $1 per pack. But the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that each pack of cigarettes sold in the United States costs the country more than $7 in medical care and lost productivity.
NEWS
January 11, 2005
Dr. S. Paul Ehrlich Jr., 72, who served as acting surgeon general for four years under Presidents Richard M. Nixon, Gerald R. Ford and Jimmy Carter and lobbied against cigarette smoking, died Thursday in Delray Beach, Fla. In 1994, he joined other surgeons general in demanding more stringent controls on tobacco on the 30th anniversary of the first surgeon general's report on smoking and disease.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 3, 2002
Maryland's First Annual Tobacco Study found significant declines in cigarette smoking in Baltimore, state officials announced yesterday. The report - based on a telephone survey - found that the percentage of adults in Baltimore who smoke cigarettes declined from 28.3 percent in 2000 to 23.6 percent this year. It also found that attempts by adults to quit smoking increased from 47.5 percent in 2000 to 53.7 percent this year. The 2000 data is based on a different survey completed that year.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 13, 1997
BEIJING -- Guiding his cab through the city with a pack of Camels in the seat alongside, Wang Cun Lai is discussing China's effort to kick the world's largest cigarette habit."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 25, 1992
SHORT HILLS, N.J. -- Back in the summer of 1983, Rose Cipollone, a smoker for 40 years, was dying of lung cancer and looking for a lawyer to sue three cigarette manufacturers. She invited Marc Z. Edell to her house in Little Ferry, N.J., and appealed to him to take her case. He tried to discourage her from tackling the cigarette industry."We sort of locked horns," Mr. Edell recalled yesterday in an interview in his law office here. "I tried to convince her how difficult it would be. I told her this litigation would be extremely burdensome and debilitating, both emotionally and from a time commitment."
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | April 19, 1994
In an often hostile exchange with congressional questioners, top tobacco company executives . . . insisted that nicotine was not addictive and said they remain unconvinced that cigarette smoking causes lung cancer, emphysema, heart disease and other life-threatening ailments.( -- Los Angeles Times"Gentlemen of the tobacco industry, thank you for coming. It's a beautiful Thursday morning and we'll try not to keep you too l. . .""Mr. Chairman, who says it's Thursday?""Yeah! Is that the AMA again?"
NEWS
February 23, 1997
SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE is overwhelming that cigarette smoking is detrimental to your health. Seven thousand six hundred Marylanders will die this year because of their smoking habits. Taxpayers will pay $123 million in Medicaid costs in Maryland to provide medical treatment for those with tobacco-related illnesses. The total annual health-care bill for smoking-related illnesses in Maryland is $4 billion.Smoking is by far Maryland's No. 1 killer. Smokers are five times more likely to turn into binge drinkers and 15 times more likely to turn to marijuana.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 5, 1996
BELLAIRE, Texas -- The nation's war over cigarette smoking is being waged on a broad new front: the great outdoors.Here in this pleasant Houston suburb, an ordinance that just took effect bans smoking anywhere in the city's public park system, with violators subject to a fine of up to $500.Bellaire joins a small but rapidly growing group of communities around the country that have gone beyond restrictions on indoor smoking to limit smoking outside as well.While proponents say the measures mark a milestone in the country's recognition of the rights of nonsmokers not to be exposed to cigarette smoke, odor or detritus, many smokers and pro-tobacco groups argue they are an outrageous sign of the gathering tyranny of the country's nonsmoking majority.
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