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By Bill Carter and Bill Carter,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 10, 1995
In an atmosphere of heightened tension between cigarette manufacturers and the press, CBS' lawyers ordered the news program "60 Minutes" not to broadcast a planned on-the-record interview with a former tobacco company executive who was harshly critical of the industry.Instead, the program has substituted a revised report for this Sunday that will examine how cigarette manufacturers try to prevent information from reaching the public.The basis for CBS' concern with the original interview was not a threat of a suit for libel, its executives said.
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NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1999
After a cigarette ignited a fatal fire that roared through a Baltimore high-rise Feb. 5, Maryland Fire Marshal Rocco J. Gabriele cautioned smokers, noting that careless smoking is the leading cause of fire deaths.But Gabriele did not mention one reason smoking remains such a fire hazard: For 20 years, the tobacco industry has defeated attempts to require that cigarettes be redesigned to make them less likely to start fires. The industry's main tactic has been to weaken support for such regulation by courting key fire officials such as Gabriele with hefty donations.
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NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 26, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In a sign of the difficulties ahead for the proposed tobacco settlement, a congressional advisory committee criticized the plan yesterday as "absolutely unacceptable" and "woefully inadequate."Rather than strengthen the government's hand, the committee said, the agreement would undercut the Food and Drug Administration's ability to regulate nicotine and make it harder to enforce restrictions on tobacco marketing and advertising.Among other things, it recommended much stiffer penalties for cigarette manufacturers if they fail to keep their promise to reduce teen smoking by at least 60 percent over 10 years.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and Marina Sarris and William F. Zorzi Jr. and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1998
The Maryland horse racing industry, casino interests and others wishing to expand legalized gambling in the state spent more than $600,000 trying to influence lawmakers during this year's General Assembly session, according to lobbying reports.Spending by gambling and other special interest groups -- which has grown to become a $20 million-a-year industry in Annapolis -- is detailed in hundreds of pages of disclosure reports filed by the lobbyists this week. The reports offer a glimpse into the enormous efforts made to sway Maryland's 188 senators and delegates.
NEWS
By ROBERT RENO | March 9, 1993
Even at relatively high present rates, taxes on cigarettes provide barely 1 percent of state revenues and an even smaller percentage of federal receipts. It is not possible, even if the price was pushed to $10 a pack, to balance the budgets of this nation on the backs of its smokers. Then why do we tax cigarettes?Well, one reason is that in an earlier age of smaller governments, before the income tax, when it was widely thought that smoking was efficacious if wicked, taxes on tobacco comprised a significant share of government revenue.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and Marina Sarris and William F. Zorzi Jr. and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1998
The Maryland horse racing industry, casino interests and others wishing to expand legalized gambling in the state spent more than $600,000 trying to influence lawmakers during this year's General Assembly session, according to lobbying reports.Spending by gambling and other special interest groups -- which has grown to become a $20 million-a-year industry in Annapolis -- is detailed in hundreds of pages of disclosure reports filed by the lobbyists this week. The reports offer a glimpse into the enormous efforts made to sway Maryland's 188 senators and delegates.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1996
Saying it's "payback time," the Maryland attorney general filed a $13 billion lawsuit against U.S. tobacco companies yesterday to recoup money the state has spent treating smoking-related illnesses among the poor.The suit accuses cigarette manufacturers of suppressing information about the dangers of smoking, concealing evidence about nicotine addiction, lying to Congress, and targeting advertising at children, women and blacks."We will allege and prove that they have engaged in suppressing and misrepresenting health information to keep the public ignorant," said Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. "I intend to win this case by forcing the industry to answer some very devastating questions: 'What did they know, when did they know it and why did they cover it up?
NEWS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK | April 25, 1997
The tobacco industry and its opponents are trying to negotiate an agreement that would give cigarette manufacturers protection from court suits in exchange for concessions from the industry: Cigarette manufacturers would limit their advertising and pay $300 billion over 25 years to injured smokers and survivors of those who died.Congressional action would be needed to give the industry protection from suits claiming damage from smoking and from suits by states seeking reimbursement for smoking-related medical expenses.
NEWS
By Robert Reno | October 10, 1997
THOSE WHO DECIDE to run with the hounds have no complaint when they catch fleas, and those who think they can strike happy bargains in the public interest with tobacco companies ought to expect to get fleeced.This is the lesson being learned as Congress, the president and the attorneys general of 39 states and the commonwealth of Puerto Rico dither about whether to go ahead with a $368.5 billion settlement. It's offered as a sort of weird treaty by which the Tobacco Republic agrees to become America's staunch ally against the evil of smoking.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1998
In a major setback for the tobacco industry, the Maryland Senate narrowly approved legislation yesterday that would help the state collect billions of dollars from cigarette manufacturers -- setting up a showdown vote today in the House of Delegates.Supporters of the high-stakes legislation predicted a close final vote in the House, with passage considered likely but not guaranteed.The bill seeks to undo a pretrial ruling last year by the judge in the state's lawsuit against the tobacco companies -- a ruling that crippled the state's case.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1998
In a major setback for the tobacco industry, the Maryland Senate narrowly approved legislation yesterday that would help the state collect billions of dollars from cigarette manufacturers -- setting up a showdown vote today in the House of Delegates.Supporters of the high-stakes legislation predicted a close final vote in the House, with passage considered likely but not guaranteed.The bill seeks to undo a pretrial ruling last year by the judge in the state's lawsuit against the tobacco companies -- a ruling that crippled the state's case.
NEWS
By Robert Reno | October 10, 1997
THOSE WHO DECIDE to run with the hounds have no complaint when they catch fleas, and those who think they can strike happy bargains in the public interest with tobacco companies ought to expect to get fleeced.This is the lesson being learned as Congress, the president and the attorneys general of 39 states and the commonwealth of Puerto Rico dither about whether to go ahead with a $368.5 billion settlement. It's offered as a sort of weird treaty by which the Tobacco Republic agrees to become America's staunch ally against the evil of smoking.
NEWS
By SANDY McINTOSH | August 24, 1997
Aliteral-minded television commentator opined recently that the quickest way to stop young people from smoking cigarettes would be for the regulatory agencies to abandon their mealy-mouthed warning labels and, instead, force the manufacturers to festoon the dead-center of each cigarette pack with an unequivocal, somber and intimidating skull-and-crossbones. That, the commentator declared, would alert those kids to the true consequences of smoking.Wrong!If I were a 13-year-old worrying about getting through my first cigarette session without retching embarrassingly in front of my friends, my decision would be made for me right then.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1997
A coalition of labor union health plans is filing dozens of class action lawsuits against the cigarette companies, saying their 30 million clients have been left out of the proposed national tobacco settlement.The lawsuits, including one in Maryland, are another blow to chances that Congress will approve the $368 billion settlement. In its current form, the settlement would ban all cigarette-related class action suits."We're up on Capitol Hill trying to make the point that they shouldn't close the courthouse door," said David A. Jewell, spokesman for the Coalition for Workers' Health Care Funds.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 26, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In a sign of the difficulties ahead for the proposed tobacco settlement, a congressional advisory committee criticized the plan yesterday as "absolutely unacceptable" and "woefully inadequate."Rather than strengthen the government's hand, the committee said, the agreement would undercut the Food and Drug Administration's ability to regulate nicotine and make it harder to enforce restrictions on tobacco marketing and advertising.Among other things, it recommended much stiffer penalties for cigarette manufacturers if they fail to keep their promise to reduce teen smoking by at least 60 percent over 10 years.
NEWS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK | April 25, 1997
The tobacco industry and its opponents are trying to negotiate an agreement that would give cigarette manufacturers protection from court suits in exchange for concessions from the industry: Cigarette manufacturers would limit their advertising and pay $300 billion over 25 years to injured smokers and survivors of those who died.Congressional action would be needed to give the industry protection from suits claiming damage from smoking and from suits by states seeking reimbursement for smoking-related medical expenses.
NEWS
By SANDY McINTOSH | August 24, 1997
Aliteral-minded television commentator opined recently that the quickest way to stop young people from smoking cigarettes would be for the regulatory agencies to abandon their mealy-mouthed warning labels and, instead, force the manufacturers to festoon the dead-center of each cigarette pack with an unequivocal, somber and intimidating skull-and-crossbones. That, the commentator declared, would alert those kids to the true consequences of smoking.Wrong!If I were a 13-year-old worrying about getting through my first cigarette session without retching embarrassingly in front of my friends, my decision would be made for me right then.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1999
After a cigarette ignited a fatal fire that roared through a Baltimore high-rise Feb. 5, Maryland Fire Marshal Rocco J. Gabriele cautioned smokers, noting that careless smoking is the leading cause of fire deaths.But Gabriele did not mention one reason smoking remains such a fire hazard: For 20 years, the tobacco industry has defeated attempts to require that cigarettes be redesigned to make them less likely to start fires. The industry's main tactic has been to weaken support for such regulation by courting key fire officials such as Gabriele with hefty donations.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1996
Saying it's "payback time," the Maryland attorney general filed a $13 billion lawsuit against U.S. tobacco companies yesterday to recoup money the state has spent treating smoking-related illnesses among the poor.The suit accuses cigarette manufacturers of suppressing information about the dangers of smoking, concealing evidence about nicotine addiction, lying to Congress, and targeting advertising at children, women and blacks."We will allege and prove that they have engaged in suppressing and misrepresenting health information to keep the public ignorant," said Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. "I intend to win this case by forcing the industry to answer some very devastating questions: 'What did they know, when did they know it and why did they cover it up?
FEATURES
By Bill Carter and Bill Carter,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 10, 1995
In an atmosphere of heightened tension between cigarette manufacturers and the press, CBS' lawyers ordered the news program "60 Minutes" not to broadcast a planned on-the-record interview with a former tobacco company executive who was harshly critical of the industry.Instead, the program has substituted a revised report for this Sunday that will examine how cigarette manufacturers try to prevent information from reaching the public.The basis for CBS' concern with the original interview was not a threat of a suit for libel, its executives said.
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