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NEWS
May 14, 1997
IN FOOTBALL, there are penalties for "piling on" after the whistle has blown and the play has stopped. If meetings of the Anne Arundel County Council had referees, the recent approval of a ban on tobacco ads on billboards would have drawn a penalty flag.The effort comes too late and contributes little to curbing tobacco's youth-oriented advertising -- especially because Anne Arundel does not have a single cigarette billboard.The council's measure would prohibit cigarette advertising on billboards in residential areas or near schools, parks or churches.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 29, 2001
GENEVA - The latest round of talks to forge an international anti-tobacco agreement ended yesterday with some of the most contentious issues, particularly a sweeping ban on cigarette advertising, left for next year. Saying tobacco is responsible for the deaths of an estimated 4 four million people a year, the World Health Organization has tried hard to encourage its 191 member countries to agree on measures to reduce significantly the use of tobacco. The organization's director, Dr. Gro Harlem Brundtland of Norway, said she was satisfied that progress had been made for talks next year.
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NEWS
April 5, 1994
HERE'S some evidence that the power of advertising may not be as strong as we think:"The potential influence on teen-age smoking that most concerned policymakers is the role of advertising. Anti-smoking activists, congressmen, and the surgeon general have all argued for restrictions of one sort or another on the ability of the cigarette industry to tell consumers about its product, in the belief that the imagery accompanying such communications will lead vulnerable teens to take up smoking.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2001
State and local officials said yesterday they don't fear that the U.S. Supreme Court's rejection of a Massachusetts cigarette advertising ban would affect marketing restrictions in Maryland, but liquor, tobacco and billboard industry representatives said they believe that the ruling calls into question several laws in Baltimore and elsewhere. The city's 1994 ban on liquor billboards, for example, could be threatened by the court's decision, which in part reaffirmed the First Amendment right of companies to advertise their products.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 29, 2001
GENEVA - The latest round of talks to forge an international anti-tobacco agreement ended yesterday with some of the most contentious issues, particularly a sweeping ban on cigarette advertising, left for next year. Saying tobacco is responsible for the deaths of an estimated 4 four million people a year, the World Health Organization has tried hard to encourage its 191 member countries to agree on measures to reduce significantly the use of tobacco. The organization's director, Dr. Gro Harlem Brundtland of Norway, said she was satisfied that progress had been made for talks next year.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | February 17, 1992
Washington. --- King James I, author of ''Counterblast to Tobacco,'' denounced tobacco as ''harmful to the brain and dangerous to the lungs'' -- this in the 17th century -- and increased taxes on it 4,000 percent. Now Virginia, the state that began with Jamestown settlement, named after James I, has flinched from increasing cigarette taxes even half as much as it should.A rejected bill would have put the tax at 20 cents a pack. Virginia's tax has been 2 1/2 cents since 1966, when it was cut from 3 cents.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer Staff writer JoAnna Daemmrich contributed to this article | October 8, 1993
Maryland's attorney general said yesterday that Baltimore and the state's metropolitan counties have the authority to pass laws banning smoking in public places and limiting cigarette advertising on billboards.But Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr., in an opinion requested by a Prince George's legislator, said a recent Maryland Court of Appeals decision makes clear that only state government can regulate the sale of cigarettes in vending machines.Mr. Curran said his opinion applies to all "home rule" jurisdictions, including Baltimore, all the major metropolitan counties, Talbot and Wicomico counties on the Eastern Shore, and the state's municipalities.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2001
State and local officials said yesterday they don't fear that the U.S. Supreme Court's rejection of a Massachusetts cigarette advertising ban would affect marketing restrictions in Maryland, but liquor, tobacco and billboard industry representatives said they believe that the ruling calls into question several laws in Baltimore and elsewhere. The city's 1994 ban on liquor billboards, for example, could be threatened by the court's decision, which in part reaffirmed the First Amendment right of companies to advertise their products.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | March 27, 1991
Washington. -- After an estimated 3.5 million American deaths from smoking in the past decade alone, the Supreme Court has finally summoned the nerve to decide whether cigarette victims or their survivors can win damages from tobacco companies.The son of a woman who died of lung cancer after smoking for more than 40 years alleges that cigarette advertising made tobacco seem medically safe. The industry maintains that the law requiring health warnings on each pack made companies immune to damages.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 2, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Smokers of cigarettes labeled low in tar and nicotine may be getting more of those substances than they think, Federal Trade Commission officials and experts in smoking now agree. And they attribute the problem to testing that has not kept up with the changes in cigarette design over the last 20 years.Since 1971, when the results of the tests were first printed in cigarette advertising and on packaging, cigarettes labeled low in tar and nicotine have taken over the market, now accounting for 60 percent of the cigarettes sold in this country.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 11, 1997
NEW YORK -- While Baltimore's City Council has been discussing ways to replicate New York City's recent gains in public safety and sanitation, the talk among city councilors here, and in municipalities around the country, is about how best to borrow the wisdom of their counterparts in Baltimore.Later this month, the New York City Council is expected to vote on -- and pass -- a bill whose authors have heavily plagiarized from a Baltimore statute: a 1994 law that restricts the placement of outdoor advertisements for tobacco products.
NEWS
May 14, 1997
IN FOOTBALL, there are penalties for "piling on" after the whistle has blown and the play has stopped. If meetings of the Anne Arundel County Council had referees, the recent approval of a ban on tobacco ads on billboards would have drawn a penalty flag.The effort comes too late and contributes little to curbing tobacco's youth-oriented advertising -- especially because Anne Arundel does not have a single cigarette billboard.The council's measure would prohibit cigarette advertising on billboards in residential areas or near schools, parks or churches.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 2, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Smokers of cigarettes labeled low in tar and nicotine may be getting more of those substances than they think, Federal Trade Commission officials and experts in smoking now agree. And they attribute the problem to testing that has not kept up with the changes in cigarette design over the last 20 years.Since 1971, when the results of the tests were first printed in cigarette advertising and on packaging, cigarettes labeled low in tar and nicotine have taken over the market, now accounting for 60 percent of the cigarettes sold in this country.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 2, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Smokers of cigarettes labeled low in tar and nicotine may be getting more of those substances than they think, Federal Trade Commission officials and experts in smoking now agree. And they attribute the problem to testing that has not kept up with the changes in cigarette design over the last 20 years.Since 1971, when the results of the tests were first printed in cigarette advertising and on packaging, cigarettes labeled low in tar and nicotine have taken over the market, now accounting for 60 percent of the cigarettes sold in this country.
NEWS
April 5, 1994
HERE'S some evidence that the power of advertising may not be as strong as we think:"The potential influence on teen-age smoking that most concerned policymakers is the role of advertising. Anti-smoking activists, congressmen, and the surgeon general have all argued for restrictions of one sort or another on the ability of the cigarette industry to tell consumers about its product, in the belief that the imagery accompanying such communications will lead vulnerable teens to take up smoking.
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | March 4, 1994
OH, WHAT a smoothie that David Kessler is. The commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration recently set a fire beneath one of America's most pernicious public health issues. But he said Congress must decide how to put the fire out, knowing full well that many elected officials will want only to ignore the smoke and go about their business-as-usual.The subject was tobacco, and in a letter to an anti-smoking activist Dr. Kessler raised the possibility that cigarettes may be considered drug-delivery devices, subject to FDA regulation.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 11, 1997
NEW YORK -- While Baltimore's City Council has been discussing ways to replicate New York City's recent gains in public safety and sanitation, the talk among city councilors here, and in municipalities around the country, is about how best to borrow the wisdom of their counterparts in Baltimore.Later this month, the New York City Council is expected to vote on -- and pass -- a bill whose authors have heavily plagiarized from a Baltimore statute: a 1994 law that restricts the placement of outdoor advertisements for tobacco products.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 2, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Smokers of cigarettes labeled low in tar and nicotine may be getting more of those substances than they think, Federal Trade Commission officials and experts in smoking now agree. And they attribute the problem to testing that has not kept up with the changes in cigarette design over the last 20 years.Since 1971, when the results of the tests were first printed in cigarette advertising and on packaging, cigarettes labeled low in tar and nicotine have taken over the market, now accounting for 60 percent of the cigarettes sold in this country.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer Staff writer JoAnna Daemmrich contributed to this article | October 8, 1993
Maryland's attorney general said yesterday that Baltimore and the state's metropolitan counties have the authority to pass laws banning smoking in public places and limiting cigarette advertising on billboards.But Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr., in an opinion requested by a Prince George's legislator, said a recent Maryland Court of Appeals decision makes clear that only state government can regulate the sale of cigarettes in vending machines.Mr. Curran said his opinion applies to all "home rule" jurisdictions, including Baltimore, all the major metropolitan counties, Talbot and Wicomico counties on the Eastern Shore, and the state's municipalities.
NEWS
September 23, 1992
Tax sheltersIn 1989 and 1990, RJR Nabisco wrote off over $3 billion in interest payments. Time Warner deducted $2.1 billion in interest payments. (1989 and 1990). The net operating loss write-offs are costing the U.S. Treasury billions of dollars.Carnival Cruises has earned a fortune in our nation. They pay little or no income tax because their company was incorporated in Panama.The tax rules and regulations won't be corrected just so long as the deal makers on Wall Street control the lawmakers in Washington.
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