Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCigarette
IN THE NEWS

Cigarette

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
Last spring I received a small azalea plant. I kept it outside in the pot all summer and recently brought it indoors. Should its nut-like nodules — maybe next year's buds or last year's flower remnants — be removed? Suggestions for overwintering the plant? Leave the "nodules"; they're probably buds. Always move your plant gradually from one temperature to another, whether indoors to outdoors or from room to room indoors, to lessen adjustment shock. Keep your azalea in medium to bright light but not direct sunlight and as cool as possible.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 30, 2014
A 52-year-old Owings Mills man was arrested and charged with attempted second-degree murder and first-degree assault for stabbing another man Friday night at a train station, Baltimore County Police said. Wilbeck Stewart is accused of stabbing a man during a fight at the Owings Mills Metro Station on Painters Mill Road. Police said that about 9:41 p.m., Stewart exited a train and the victim approached him. The men argued and fought over a cigarette, police said. Stewart was arrested at the scene; the victim was taken to the hospital for treatment of serious injuries.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 6, 2012
We're almost a month away from another legislative session, so it was no surprise to read The Sun's editorial in favor of higher cigarette taxes ("A life-saving tax," Nov. 25). While lobbyists like Vinnie DeMarco prepare their annual push to punish smokers, the rationale to raise cigarette taxes is as flawed as ever. Higher cigarette prices may discourage smoking, but there is hardly the direct connection between declining rates of smoking and higher tobacco taxes as The Sun claims.
NEWS
July 9, 2014
I'm not a cigarette smoker, although I did try to get myself addicted when I was a kid. I smoked Camel no filters for a year but I never liked them. They stank, they tasted bad and the "high" was terrible - if you can call wanting to throw up a "high. " I eventually gave them up out of disgust, and I still can't stand the smell. In fact, I can't think of anything good to say about tobacco at all. But having said all that, I still have to stand up for the rights of smokers to kill themselves if they want to. When I read in your paper that some employers will not hire smokers, that's going way to far ( "In Maryland, smoking could cost you job," July 5)
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2012
Maryland's seizures of contraband tobacco quadrupled between 2010 and 2012, Comptroller Peter Franchot said Wednesday, attributing the increase in part to lax penalties that fail to deter cigarette smugglers from a highly profitable enterprise. Flanked by piles of confiscated tobacco and alcohol products, Franchot announced that his field enforcement agents and other police agencies had seized 325,851 packs of illegally trafficked cigarettes valued at $2 million in the 12 months that ended June 30. The confiscations represent a near-doubling of the previous year's total of 184,498 and are more than four times the total posted in the fiscal year that ended June 30, 2010.
NEWS
January 26, 1994
Take away Gov. William Donald Schaefer's proposed 25-cent per pack increase in the cigarette tax and his 1994 budget that was released last week is pretty mundane. A pay raise for state workers, for sure, but basic, hold-the-line allocations for most state agencies. Only when the new "sin tax" money is added to the pot is there controversy.Opposition comes from two sources: 1) Legislators allied with tobacco interests who want to kill any tax rise on cigarettes; 2) legislators who are concerned that the governor is once again exceeding the General Assembly's voluntary spending affordability limit.
NEWS
August 30, 2014
A 52-year-old Owings Mills man was arrested and charged with attempted second-degree murder and first-degree assault for stabbing another man Friday night at a train station, Baltimore County Police said. Wilbeck Stewart is accused of stabbing a man during a fight at the Owings Mills Metro Station on Painters Mill Road. Police said that about 9:41 p.m., Stewart exited a train and the victim approached him. The men argued and fought over a cigarette, police said. Stewart was arrested at the scene; the victim was taken to the hospital for treatment of serious injuries.
NEWS
May 10, 2012
It is inexcusable for your reporter to refer to the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine as "a physicians group" ("Doctors group says no junk food for the Obamas," May 7). The article not only fails to identify PCRM for what it is - an activist group devoted to promoting a vegan lifestyle - but goes on to parrot their agenda by suggesting thatMrs. Obama's choice to eat a cheeseburger is unhealthy. Worse, it repeats PCRM's crude analogy of eating a slice of pizza to smoking a cigarette.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan | February 28, 2007
A grand jury indicted three Baltimore men yesterday on federal charges of robbing six delivery trucks of cartons of cigarettes in the city. According to the indictment, the defendants - Keith Debnam, 41, Michael Goodwyn, 39, and Clyde Ringgold, 42 - robbed delivery truck drivers in July and August of 667 cigarette cartons worth about $24,500, and a case of apple Danish pastries. The defendants, who are in state custody, were arrested last summer on state charges, federal prosecutors said yesterday.
NEWS
By Seattle Times | March 10, 1993
MERCER ISLAND, Wash. -- It was just a few months ago that engineer Al Deskiewicz realized, as he puts it, "Al, you're a drug addict."After 34 years of smoking some 35 Marlboros daily, Mr. Deskiewicz knew he needed medical help to quit smoking. And one more thought occurred to him: Philip Morris, the makers of Marlboros, shared responsibility with him for his addiction.The conglomerate disagreed. Mr. Deskiewicz responded with a small-claims lawsuit, only the second such suit against a tobacco company.
NEWS
By Isaac Howley | June 25, 2014
This year marks the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Surgeon General's report on the harms of smoking, which launched anti-tobacco public health efforts that have saved an estimated 8 million American lives. We are today a far more educated public when it comes to the dangers of cigarette use. Yet a bill in the Maryland House of Delegates that would treat e-cigarettes like normal cigarettes, and thus ban their use in public buildings, was roundly defeated this year. The bill didn't even make it out of committee.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
Maryland health care lobbyists have launched a negative radio ad against East Baltimore Democrat Julius Henson, who is challenging State Sen. Nathaniel McFadden in this month's primary election. The ad, paid for by Maryland Citizens' Health Initiative Inc., praises the public health record of McFadden and criticizes Henson, a long-time campaign operative who does not support a plan to increase the tobacco tax. The group wants Maryland lawmakers to raise the tax on each pack of cigarettes from $2 to $3 to disincentivize smoking.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
A 59-year-old Pikesville man pleaded guilty on Friday of conspiracy to traffic in black market cigarettes, the U.S. Attorney for Maryland announced Friday. Adam Azerman drove a van loaded with contraband cigarettes from Maryland to Brooklyn for a family crime organization that trafficked more than $6.6 million in black market cigarettes and illegal foreign drugs through a Baltimore restaurant and a Pikesville pharmacy. The statement from the U.S. Attorney's Office, said that Azerman's co-conspirators would meet him in Brooklyn, take the van and return it empty a few hours later.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler has sent letters to 10 e-cigarette manufacturers questioning what the companies are doing to prevent sales to underage buyers. The letters come as the safety and regulation of the devices face increased scrutiny. The makers of e-cigarettes say the devices are safer than traditional cigarettes and can help smokers quit, but reports of poisonings related to the products have spiked. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently said it is seeking regulatory authority over the devices.
FEATURES
By Arlene Karidis, For The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
It's lunch time, and William Brown has stepped away from his desk for a nicotine fix in the lobby of the building where he works. The city employee isn't allowed to smoke here, but he can vape. He flips the switch on his sleek black electronic cigarette, with its digital readout to gauge the nicotine, and inhales. He sucks in on the plastic tip and blows out a big white cloud that dissipates fast. People pass by, but Brown says he rarely gets a reaction. "E-cigarettes have gotten so popular that when you spew out vapor, people put one and one together," said Brown, who works for the Municipal Telephone Exchange.
NEWS
April 7, 2014
Opening day 2014 last week was a blast ("Opening Day is magic for fans as weather breaks and Orioles win," March 31). My husband and I went with our son and daughter-in-law, and we will come again to other games with our grandchildren, ages 4, 5 and 13. On Monday, there were two boys who were about 10 sitting two rows away who craned their necks each time the adults in the row between us "lit up" their electronic cigarettes. The boys were clearly being exposed to something new, judging from their staring and gesticulations.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | September 21, 1993
A 46-year-old city employee was shot to death last night after a stranger began fighting with him over a cigarette, Baltimore homicide detectives said.Ellsworth Briscoe of the 600 block of W. Lafayette Ave. was shot several times about 7:45 p.m. at Pennsylvania Avenue and Mosher Street, police said.He was pronounced dead at the scene, and the killer was being sought last night, detectives reported.On duty as an employee for the Baltimore City Water and Waste Water Bureau, police said Mr. Briscoe was sitting in a city-owned truck when the stranger approached and asked for a cigarette.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 3, 2002
Maryland's First Annual Tobacco Study found significant declines in cigarette smoking in Baltimore, state officials announced yesterday. The report - based on a telephone survey - found that the percentage of adults in Baltimore who smoke cigarettes declined from 28.3 percent in 2000 to 23.6 percent this year. It also found that attempts by adults to quit smoking increased from 47.5 percent in 2000 to 53.7 percent this year. The 2000 data is based on a different survey completed that year.
NEWS
By Melanie Balakit, Capital News Service | March 24, 2014
Annapolis businessman David Purdy started smoking when he was 15. He tried nicotine patches to kick the addiction. Later, he tried Nicorette gum. Neither worked. Then a neighbor, also a heavy smoker, introduced him to an e-cigarette, a battery-operated device that mimics smoking a traditional cigarette. Unlike a tobacco cigarette, it emits vapor, not smoke. Purdy, then 47, gave it a try. "Within a month, I started feeling the health benefits of it," Purdy said. "I started tasting food again much better, started breathing much better.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
The air is alive with perhaps a dozen sweet scents at Kahuna Vapor in Ellicott City, customers adding to the aroma with every vaporous exhalation. They're not smoking. They're "vaping" - using a battery-powered electronic cigarette that heats flavored liquid nicotine into a vapor users can inhale. Such stores are popping up fast nationwide, quadrupling in the last year alone to about 3,000, according to an estimate by the Smoke Free Alternatives Trade Association. Kahuna Vapor, one of at least three to open locally in the last two months, opened a storefront soon after starting as an online business making local deliveries.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.