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By William Lowe and William Lowe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 18, 2000
CHERYL NODAR HAS something that most of us want but few attain: She has a job she loves. Nodar began working at historic Cider Mill Farm 10 years ago as a tour guide. She took to the work quickly and soon was promoted to manager of operations. "It was like finding where I belong," Nodar said. "It's everything I could ever want in a job." For Nodar, who has a fondness for animals and natural beauty, Cider Mill Farm is the perfect workplace. On 59 pastoral acres in Elkridge, Cider Mill has one of the areas only petting farms.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | May 8, 2009
Thomas Wilton Owens, a former electrical engineer who restored and operated Howard County's historic Cider Mill Farm where patrons came for years to purchase freshly pressed apple cider and homemade fruit pies, died of pneumonia April 28 at Sanctuary Holy Cross, a Burtonsville nursing home. He was 80. Mr. Owens was born at home in Glendale Heights and later moved to Clifton Avenue with his family. He dropped out of Polytechnic Institute in 1946 and enlisted in the Marine Corps. He served in China and also earned his General Educational Development certificate.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | May 8, 2009
Thomas Wilton Owens, a former electrical engineer who restored and operated Howard County's historic Cider Mill Farm where patrons came for years to purchase freshly pressed apple cider and homemade fruit pies, died of pneumonia April 28 at Sanctuary Holy Cross, a Burtonsville nursing home. He was 80. Mr. Owens was born at home in Glendale Heights and later moved to Clifton Avenue with his family. He dropped out of Polytechnic Institute in 1946 and enlisted in the Marine Corps. He served in China and also earned his General Educational Development certificate.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2004
Fall festival Celebrating the fall harvest the old-fashioned way, Weber's Cider Mill Farm hosts the Johnny Appleseed Festival Saturday and Sunday with traditional farm games and wares from Maryland apple growers. Browse displays of fresh-pressed apple cider, home-baked fruit pies and preserves. Walk through the hay maze, eat some pit beef, hop on the hayride, pick apples, make a scarecrow or have your face painted. Stop by the Olde Barn Gift Shop or catch the Satyr Hill Band's acoustic jams.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2002
Vines sprouting new leaves poked from beneath the warped, weathered siding of Cider Mill Farm's oldest buildings, as architectural historians Alice Morrison Mordoh and Tom Reinhart examined them under a bright but chilly spring sun. Quiet now but for the occasional loud braying of a donkey, the Elkridge cider and pie-making farm that once attracted thousands of families awaits auction and demolition -- and a future as a development of 94 expensive suburban...
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2001
Three-year-old AJ Strott held out his feed-filled hand and was suddenly a sheep's best friend. "Hey," he protested with a laugh, as the pellets disappeared in a lightning-fast moment of munching. "It tickles!" Thousands of children like AJ get a rare up-close visit with animals and agriculture every year at Cider Mill Farm, where they run across gently rolling land to touch chickens, milk a cow and try the fresh-squeezed drink that gives the place its name. Welcome to Maryland farming, suburban style.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2002
Cider Mill Farm, a rural landmark in an increasing suburban landscape, is suddenly closing its doors without the public getting a chance to say goodbye. The hands-on farm in Elkridge, where children could milk cows and feed goats, had been expected to open April 8 for at least one more season, before closing in a deal to sell its 59 acres for development. But in recent days the decision was made to close for financial reasons, causing scheduled tours for more than 2,000 children to be canceled.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2002
The popular hands-on farm that was one of the most visible symbols of agriculture in suburban Baltimore - and in its recent demise, a potent reminder of the seeming inevitability of development - is springing back to life eight miles from its origins. In an unexpected twist, the family of former state Sen. James Clark Jr. will announce today that they're bringing in Cider Mill Farm's manager to re-create the agritourism activities on part of their 548-acre Ellicott City cropland. Clark's Elioak Farm is expected to open Sept.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2002
Cider Mill Farm, a 59-acre rural Elkridge enclave where generations of suburban children have milked a cow, watched chickens and ridden in a hay wagon, will soon sprout 94 expensive new homes instead. The farm will remain open at least one more season as the family of the ill owner, Tom Owens, and Keelty builders oversee the development of the farm's most profitable crop yet. "The last cows in Elkridge live on the corner of Landing and Ilchester roads. Everything is just falling like dominoes," said Sally Voris, a community activist and local historian.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2001
At Cider Mill Farm - nestled in a suburban setting on 59 acres - a cow calmly allows children to pull on its udder, goats stand on their hind legs and beg for food from passers-by, and the staff brews thousands of gallons of fresh apple cider. Many area families have made the farm in Elkridge part of their fall tradition - buying pumpkins, apples or Indian corn and taking hayrides around the farm. But the future of the 85-year-old farm is in doubt. The owner, Tom Owens, 73, suffered a cerebral hemorrhage last year and is in a nursing home, said Cheryl Nodar, the farm's general manager.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2003
Something about the arrival of fall's cool weather and colorful leaves seems to inspire people to pick crunchy red apples, choose perfect bulbous orange pumpkins and ride around the countryside in a wagon full of prickly hay. More than a dozen Central Maryland farms are happy to oblige the public's yearning for traditional harvest activities, with some operations offering extras such as animals, scarecrow-making and straw and corn mazes. Such agritourism businesses rely on autumn inspiration to fuel the most profitable time of the year - even more so this year after sniper attacks discouraged customers last fall and wet weather interfered with farming this summer.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2002
The popular hands-on farm that was one of the most visible symbols of agriculture in suburban Baltimore - and in its recent demise, a potent reminder of the seeming inevitability of development - is springing back to life eight miles from its origins. In an unexpected twist, the family of former state Sen. James Clark Jr. will announce today that they're bringing in Cider Mill Farm's manager to re-create the agritourism activities on part of their 548-acre Ellicott City cropland. Clark's Elioak Farm is expected to open Sept.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2002
Vines sprouting new leaves poked from beneath the warped, weathered siding of Cider Mill Farm's oldest buildings, as architectural historians Alice Morrison Mordoh and Tom Reinhart examined them under a bright but chilly spring sun. Quiet now but for the occasional loud braying of a donkey, the Elkridge cider and pie-making farm that once attracted thousands of families awaits auction and demolition -- and a future as a development of 94 expensive suburban...
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2002
Cider Mill Farm, a rural landmark in an increasing suburban landscape, is suddenly closing its doors without the public getting a chance to say goodbye. The hands-on farm in Elkridge, where children could milk cows and feed goats, had been expected to open April 8 for at least one more season, before closing in a deal to sell its 59 acres for development. But in recent days the decision was made to close for financial reasons, causing scheduled tours for more than 2,000 children to be canceled.
NEWS
January 27, 2002
Homeowners selling `yards' as property values, taxes rise In long-settled sections of eastern Howard County, expensive new homes are filling spare spaces as soaring real estate prices - with taxes to match - are pressuring suburbanites to sell any extra acres that surround their older homes. "People are literally selling their back yards to put a house in," said Mary Catherine Cochran, president of Preservation Howard County. Some people are willingly cashing in, but others say they are being forced to sell their excess land to developers because they can't afford sharply higher taxes.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2002
Cider Mill Farm, a 59-acre rural Elkridge enclave where generations of suburban children have milked a cow, watched chickens and ridden in a hay wagon, will soon sprout 94 expensive new homes instead. The farm will remain open at least one more season as the family of the ill owner, Tom Owens, and Keelty builders oversee the development of the farm's most profitable crop yet. "The last cows in Elkridge live on the corner of Landing and Ilchester roads. Everything is just falling like dominoes," said Sally Voris, a community activist and local historian.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1995
You've heard of the gentleman farmer? Steve Weber might be better described as an entertainment farmer.On a clear and sunny October morning, the co-proprietor of Weber's Cider Mill Farm in the Carney area of Baltimore County puts a foot up on a picnic table and leans on his knee, watching a half-dozen pre-school kids totter past. Each is clutching an orange gourd happily to his or her chest -- in some cases, a load almost too big to carry."I think you could call this entertainment farming.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2004
Fall festival Celebrating the fall harvest the old-fashioned way, Weber's Cider Mill Farm hosts the Johnny Appleseed Festival Saturday and Sunday with traditional farm games and wares from Maryland apple growers. Browse displays of fresh-pressed apple cider, home-baked fruit pies and preserves. Walk through the hay maze, eat some pit beef, hop on the hayride, pick apples, make a scarecrow or have your face painted. Stop by the Olde Barn Gift Shop or catch the Satyr Hill Band's acoustic jams.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2002
The Robey administration plans to introduce legislation tomorrow night to reduce the amusement tax on farm-related activities - part of a larger effort to encourage farmers to stay in business. The bill would reduce the amusement tax from 7.5 percent to 5 percent for activities on a working farm that are open to the public, or to invited groups for purposes of education, recreation or involvement in farm operations. It covers services such as hay rides, corn mazes, farm tours and picnic-party facilities offered in conjunction with those activities.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2001
At Cider Mill Farm - nestled in a suburban setting on 59 acres - a cow calmly allows children to pull on its udder, goats stand on their hind legs and beg for food from passers-by, and the staff brews thousands of gallons of fresh apple cider. Many area families have made the farm in Elkridge part of their fall tradition - buying pumpkins, apples or Indian corn and taking hayrides around the farm. But the future of the 85-year-old farm is in doubt. The owner, Tom Owens, 73, suffered a cerebral hemorrhage last year and is in a nursing home, said Cheryl Nodar, the farm's general manager.
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