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By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2013
Make room for cider and mead. In Maryland, cider was last popular in Colonial times. Mead never has been. But a new generation of mead and cider makers, with their feet planted firmly in Maryland soil, are rethinking these age-old fermented beverages and introducing them to new audiences. The meads from Orchid Cellar Winery in Middletown and the small-batch cider wines from Millstone Cellars in Monkton are showing up on the shelves of boutique wine and liquor stores. Bartenders are crafting them into cocktails at restaurants like Woodberry Kitchen and Bluegrass . Andrzej Wilk Jr. of Orchid Cellar and Kyle Sherrer of Millstone are the new agers, inspired by and committed to the attitudes about methods and sourcing that have inspired a generation of farm-to-table chefs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Clementine is hosting a fall harvest festival dinner, 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., on Sept. 23. The evening will feature a five-course dinner paired with ciders from Monkton's Millstone Cellars. On the menu are hearty game dishes like granola-crusted venison, bacon-wrapped rabbit loin and roast pheasant breast with cornbread dressing and cinnamon honey tomato jam. The menu is a collaboration between Clementine owner Winston Blick and the restaurant's new head chef, Bill Buszinski, formerly of Mr. Rain's Fun House.
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NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,[Sun reporter] | October 18, 2006
Starbucks 2400 Boston St., Baltimore -- 410-534-0563 Hours --5:30 a.m.-10 p.m. Mondays-Fridays; 6 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturdays-Sundays In and out in --6 minutes Here, we accepted the barista's offer to top the grande cider, $2.36, with some whipped cream. Bad idea. The cider was way too tart, which soured the cream. Even without the cream, the drink needed much more spice to balance its heavy apple accent. Know of a good carryout place? Let us hear about it. Write to sam.sessa@baltsun.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | February 18, 2014
For as much media coverage as our snow days in Baltimore seem to receive it's often interesting to note that there is a very short list of goals on any given winter day in which the accumulation brings everything to a grinding halt. 1) dig out your car, 2) reserve parking space with furniture, 3) proceed to the nearest bar and drink copiously (but preferably responsibly according to the legal department). Considering the topic of this weekly column, goal No. 3 is our focus. The other day I made an earnest attempt at walking to the Inner Harbor or possibly beyond for some obligatory snowtography - hey look!
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | April 2, 1992
Beer on cider's a good rider; cider on beer makes your head feel queer.-- Old pub sayingLONDON -- Scrumpy will get you if you don't watch out.In fact, some of the few pubs that sell it will allow only 2 pints per customer. Not a drop more.A guy named Harry, encountered in the Builders Arms pub not long ago, allowed that cider is all he drinks."Doesn't give me gas," said Harry, a true epicure.Scrumpy is hard cider, made of crushed apples allowed to ferment naturally. It's neither filtered nor pasteurized nor pumped full of carbon dioxide as so many others are.Scrumpy is the generic name for the real thing.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 16, 1997
THE BEST EATING and baking apples -- Red and Golden Delicious, Empire and Stayman -- will arrive early tomorrow morning from an orchard in northern Maryland.It's time for the Severna Park Kiwanis Club's annual Apple and Cider Sale.The hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. tomorrow and Saturday and again Oct. 24 and 25 at the Woods Community Center (formerly the Severna Park YMCA).Along with the freshest apples, there will be equally fresh cider (pressed the day before the sale) in gallon and half-gallon jugs as well as my favorite, apple butter.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1998
It is a season of discontent for cider makers across Maryland, and for purists who consider autumn incomplete without a taste of the darkly sweet tang of fresh-pressed, unprocessed apple juice.Once a harvest staple, the beverage is fast disappearing from grocery stores, farm markets and even roadside stands under the pressure of new federal warnings about a dangerous strain of E. coli bacteria and sharper scrutiny by the state health department.Making and selling autumn's signature treat has, in short, become a test of economics and ingenuity for fruit farmers across Maryland.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1997
Bernadette Cider began studying psychology to understand her children a little better.After earning a master's degree in the field, Mrs. Cider helped a generation of Baltimore schoolchildren understand themselves a little better."
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | January 25, 2004
My husband and I share a common fear. We're both terrified of arriving at a dinner party on the wrong night. We have even waited before going to our hosts' door by driving around the block until we see other guests parking their cars. Never, though, have we worried about people not showing up for a meal at our house, but that's what happened last week. We had invited three sophomore boys from Amherst College, where my husband teaches, to come for a midweek supper. Young aspiring cooks, they had volunteered to help me entertain in exchange for some informal culinary instruction, so I invited them to supper to talk about this project.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | December 9, 2001
For the next few weeks, as Christmas approaches, our small, quiet New England town will come alive with holiday entertaining. This year, my husband and I have opted for a small get-together: a simple buffet for 10 at our house. Cider-Roasted Turkey Breasts will be the centerpiece of the meal. I'll serve the breasts sliced, napped with sauce and garnished with fresh sage and thyme along with apple wedges. Side dishes will include a wild rice pilaf, a bowl of mashed sweet potatoes and turnips, and glistening cranberry chutney.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | February 11, 2014
I ♥ apples, but it's pretty difficult to find a drink that incorporates the fruit well. (In other words, doesn't make it taste like a disgusting Jolly Rancher-infused swill of sugar.) So it's a bit of a surprise that I've managed to find one now, in the dead of winter, and at Riptide by the Bay in Fells Point, of all places. Actually, the laid-back bar, known more for crab deals in the summer, has a pretty nice cocktail program going on. And its Hot Spiked Homemade Apple Cider ranks high on the list.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple and By Evan Siple | November 19, 2013
Can a Margarita be seasonal without being summery? It seems by its very nature to be a warm-weather drink. Lip-smacking tart, heavy on the booze with or without a salted rim, the Margarita conjures beachfront images of fun and sunsets in far-flung locations. But the folks at Canton's Tavern on the Square are trying to flip that script and make a fall version of the time-honored cocktail: the Apple Cider Margarita. I know, I know. It seems like a reach. The sour mix is still there, as is, of course, Patron Resposado.
EXPLORE
By Kit Waskom Pollard | August 20, 2013
“People go crazy over our chicken salad,” says Eriksson Hill of Harford County's popular WOLO Food Truck. From his mobile restaurant, operated with partner John Schonacher, Hill serves “Food That Rocks!” In this fun, flavorful spin on chicken salad, roasted jalapeños and Old Bay provide subtle heat while dried cranberries and cider vinegar add a tangy edge. WOLO Food Truck “We Only Live Once” woloeats.com WOLO Chicken Salad Serves 8 Chef Hill uses a food processor to make quick work of the chopping and dicing.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
This could be the big summer of cider. We've fallen hard for the crisp dry hard ciders coming out of Millstone Cellars in Monkton, which are so refreshing for hot-weather dining. The Maryland Wineries will host Locapour - Drink Local , a tasting event at the Baltimore County Center for Maryland Agriculture and Farm Park on July 11 featuring five Maryland cider and mead producers. The event will include food vendors, live music and family activities. The participating wine producers are Great Shoals Winery (Princess Anne)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2013
Make room for cider and mead. In Maryland, cider was last popular in Colonial times. Mead never has been. But a new generation of mead and cider makers, with their feet planted firmly in Maryland soil, are rethinking these age-old fermented beverages and introducing them to new audiences. The meads from Orchid Cellar Winery in Middletown and the small-batch cider wines from Millstone Cellars in Monkton are showing up on the shelves of boutique wine and liquor stores. Bartenders are crafting them into cocktails at restaurants like Woodberry Kitchen and Bluegrass . Andrzej Wilk Jr. of Orchid Cellar and Kyle Sherrer of Millstone are the new agers, inspired by and committed to the attitudes about methods and sourcing that have inspired a generation of farm-to-table chefs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, For The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2012
Most people go to farmers' markets in search of that perfect tomato or apple, meats are also sold at many of them. That's right, beef, chicken, pork and even bison can be found in the stalls at most farmers' markets in the area. Pork is among my favorites. Fatty, lean, smoked or plain, I can eat pork in countless ways. I'm even a fan of the parts that most supermarkets don't sell, such as the ears, jowls, feet and tails (which all can be bought at the farmers' market), but I'm a sucker for the classic pork chop.
FEATURES
By Andrew Schloss and Andrew Schloss,Special to The Evening Sun | October 10, 1990
WHETHER SWEET, HARD or packing an inebriating whollop, apple cider is the potion to down by the dram when foliage flares to ochre and red. It is the lacquer which paints a plain roast chicken with a glaze of just fallen fruit. And it's the jug on the pantry shelf which calls us to luxuriate in another harvest before winter settles in.Cider is made by crushing apples into a pulp and then pressing the pulp to extract its juice. After that, the juice can be bottled and sold immediately, in which case it is called "sweet cider," or it can be stored in barrels to ferment in the same way that grape juice is fermented into wine, after which, it is called "hard cider."
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1999
Whazzat noise, you ask, as the stillness of the night is momentarily shattered. It could be just about anything this time of the year, you tell yourself, or anyone else willing to listen to your feeble explanations. An overactive imagination? A tree scraping against the house? A creaky iron gate? A loose shutter? Is it something in the attic? The wind moaning through the trees, perhaps? Who knows, and who really wants to investigate as a certain weakness spreads through the lower knees and the heart begins to slightly race?
NEWS
October 12, 2012
'Apple Fest Family Fun Day' Come celebrate the local apple harvest from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 27 at Whole Foods Market in Annapolis Towne Centre, 200 Harker Place. Free pie tins to the first 200 guests, hot apple cider samples, free recipe cards and caramel-apple making are among the included activities. All are welcome. Information: 410-266-5761. Tax season Volunteers are needed to assist with the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program to help seniors and low-income adults with their 2012 tax returns.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Josh Houser III | October 26, 2011
Halloween drinks are, for the most part, novelty items. Fake eyeballs, candy corn and even dry ice are all unfortunately used to dramatic effect this time of year. I have never been a fan of silly or gimmicky drink accessories. It makes me think that the bartender has something to hide. What's behind the cuteness winds up being an overly sweet or sour weak drink that I just wasted good money on. Luckily, the good people at Jack's Bistro are here to save us from such garish garnishes.
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