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NEWS
April 14, 2005
On April 13, 2005, NICHOLAS CIARA, beloved husband of Ann Marie (nee Ertl) Ciara; father of Noelle Marie and Christian Nicholas Ciara; son of Carolina and the late Gaspare Ciaramitaro. Visitation with family on Friday at the Sacred Heart Church of Glyndon from 9 A.M. to 10 A.M. followed by Mass of Christian Burial at 10 A.M. Interment Druid Ridge Cemetery. If so desired, donations may be made to the American Cancer Society, 8219 Town Center Dr., P.O. Box 43025, Balto., MD. 21236-0025. Arrangements by the ELINE FUNERAL HOME, 410-833-1414.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
No one writes a love song like Future. The 30-year-old, born Nayvadius Wilburn, hinted at his prowess on earlier mixtapes, but the Atlanta artist set himself apart from peers on his 2012 debut album, “Pluto.” In particular, Future won a legion of fans with the hit ballad-meets-banger, “Turn on the Lights,” which found him tenderly singing, through amplified Auto-Tune, “I wanna tell the world about you just so they can get jealous.” His...
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NEWS
September 28, 2004
PAULA CIARA, of North Falmouth, MA, formerly of Baltimore, MD, died Friday, September 24, 2004. She was 71. She is survived by her husband of 43 years, Mario Ciara; two daughters, Susan Ciara Hathaway of Darien, CT and Ann Ciara Olsen of Magnolia, MD; a sister, Jacqueline Sunderland Finer of Washington, D.C. and three grandchildren. A Memorial Mass will be held at 10 A.M. on Wednesday, September 29, at Saint Elizabeth's Church, N. Falmouth, MA. Memorial contributions may be made to Cape Cod COPD Support Group, 404 Great Marsh, Centerville, MD 02632.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | katherine.dunn@baltsun.com | February 12, 2010
Ciara Webb has played organized basketball only for a little more than two years, but she has already drawn attention from Division I college programs, including Northeastern, Rider, Massachusetts, Middle Tennessee State and George Washington. The Patterson junior point guard followed her brother Michael, a Patterson senior, into sports and built a solid foundation for her quick success on the basketball court with natural athleticism, lots of pickup games and years of playing soccer and softball.
NEWS
July 8, 2003
IF ANYTHING could surpass the unspeakably tormented life and brutal death of Ciara Jobes, it's the suggestion of child welfare advocates that she is simply the case we know about, just one of many victims dying a different sort of death out of public view. She was starved, imprisoned and mercilessly whipped with electrical cords, and now the 15-year-old girl's death must be the leverage for a top to bottom examination of how state government deals with children in distress. Suffering of the sort inflicted on Ciara Jobes and other helpless children will, if unaddressed, call into question society's commitment to justice and compassion.
NEWS
December 21, 2002
The Sun's article on the abuse and death of 15-year-old Ciara Jobes was overwhelming ("Guardian charged with murder of girl, 15," Dec. 13). Her bruised and emaciated body represents the darkest side of human behavior. Reading the details of Ciara's life, it becomes apparent that it offered many red flags that were noticed far too late. One example is the lack of timely intervention by the city schools and courts when the child never set foot in Patterson High this fall - and this after a period of frequent absences from as many as 10 other city schools.
NEWS
October 2, 2004
Paula T. Ciara, a former educator who had been active in the Junior League of Baltimore, died of cancer Sept. 24 at her home in North Falmouth, Mass. She was 71. She was born Paula Tippett in Baltimore and raised in the city's Homewood section. She was the daughter of the late William T. Tippett, chief judge of the old People's Court. A graduate of Notre Dame Preparatory School, she earned a bachelor's degree in history in 1954 from the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, and a master's in education in 1979 from Fitchburg State College in Fitchburg, Mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | January 5, 2006
Ciara? Who? During the summer of 2004, the slick, crunked-out "Goodies" was the No. 1 song in the country, its heavy, pulsing beat booming from car speakers or shaking club walls. I dug the record and cranked it up if I happened to be in the car when the tune came on. It was hard to miss since the cut was on the air, like, every 10 minutes. Because the Lil' Jon-produced track was so hot, I paid little attention to the thin-voiced chick delivering the lines in a somewhat robotic croon. But soon Miss Thing became almost inescapable.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2003
A year to the day after Ciara Jobes' bruised and emaciated body was found in a Southeast Baltimore rowhouse, her grandmother returned there last night to hold a candlelight vigil. "We came here tonight to let Ciara know that she may be gone a year, but we still think about her," said Iva Cruse, 55, who organized the gathering at the O'Donnell Heights rowhouse where Ciara, who was 15 when she died, spent her last days. Police found the girl's body, which was covered with cuts from recent beatings, last Dec. 12 and arrested her legal guardian, Satrina Roberts, 32, who lived with Ciara in the home in the 1200 block of Gregor Way. Roberts is jailed, awaiting trial on a charge of first-degree murder.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2003
A 15-year-old girl whose emaciated body was discovered in December had as many as 700 wounds and bruises by the time authorities found her, according to an autopsy report obtained by The Sun yesterday. Police found Ciara Jobes' tattered, sexually abused body in her guardian's kitchen in a Southeast Baltimore apartment last year. The guardian, Satrina Roberts, 31, is charged with murder and child abuse. Her attorney, who had initially suggested that Ciara's injuries were sensationalized and that her death was not caused by abuse, changed course after seeing the results of the autopsy.
NEWS
April 18, 2008
On April 13, 2008, MARGARET JEAN BROWN. Survived by son, Demetris Brown(Cheryl), daughters, Marcelette Lee(Robert) and Sharon K. Brown, brothers, John Jones Jr. of NV., Furney G. Jones and Cornelius Jones both of NC and Reginald Jones of CO., sisters, Martha J. Strayhorn, Carolyn J. Jones, and Jacquelyn Dupree all of NC and Jonnye B. Warren of AL. ,grandchildren Ciara Lee and Kristin Brown and a host of other family and friends. The Family will receive friends for the services Friday at Prince Hall Masons Masonic Temple, 1307 Eutaw Place, 10:00am wake 11:00am Funeral.
FEATURES
October 25, 2007
66 Anne Tyler Author 50 Nancy Cartwright Actress 45 Chad Smith Rock musician 36 Midori Violinist 22 Ciara Singer
NEWS
August 19, 2007
FILM THE MAN WHO WOULD BE KING -- 2:45 p.m. today; 4:10 p.m. Monday-Thursday. AFI Silver Theatre and Cultural Center, 8633 Colesville Road, Silver Spring. $8.50. 301-495-6700 or afi.com/silver. The Man Who Would Be King is one of the rare "dream films" by a great director that really came true. In the 1950s, John Huston envisioned making this adventure with Humphrey Bogart and Clark Gable as rogues who con their way into control of a mountain kingdom in India. Then Bogart died; then Gable died.
NEWS
January 7, 2007
On December 29, 2006, R'GWEN C.; beloved wife of Wayne A. Johnson. She is also surivved by one son, Morris Gough II; on daughter PFC Ciara Gough; her mother Beatrice Randolph; godmother Evelyn Johnson; two aunts and one uncle; cousins, other relatives and friends. Friends may call a th the family owned HOWELL FUNERAL HOME, 4600 Liberty Heights Avenue on Sunday 12 Noon to 5 p.m. Family will receive friends at Payne Memorial A.M.E. Church, Madison Avenue and Laurens Streets, on Monday 12 Noon to 12:30 p.m., with funeral services immediately following.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | November 23, 2006
State and city officials yesterday disclosed yesterday their court settlements -- totaling at least $92,500 -- with Iva T. Cruse, whose granddaughter died four years ago at the hands of an abusive caretaker. Cruse received $82,500 from the state Department of Human Resources, which oversees the city Department of Social Services, said Kevin Enright, a spokesman for the attorney general's office. The city school board paid Cruse $10,000, said Vanessa Pyatt, a school system spokeswoman. The amount was covered by the City's Risk Management Fund, Pyatt said.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | November 22, 2006
The grandmother of a Baltimore teenager who died at the hands of an abusive legal guardian has been awarded $15 million for a civil lawsuit, but it is unlikely that she'll ever receive any of that money. Iva T. Cruse filed her suit in August 2004, naming plaintiffs ranging from city social services and public schools to Satrina Roberts, the woman later convicted of killing 15-year-old Ciara Jobes. Roberts did not participate in the proceedings, so Baltimore Circuit Judge Paul E. Alpert entered a summary judgment against her. Alpert awarded Cruse $15 million after listening to evidence and arguments during a half-day bench trial, said Mark Herman, Cruse's attorney.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Laurie Willis and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2002
At times, it was difficult to hear the soloists over the wails. And some relatives of Ciara Jobes were so overcome with emotion yesterday that they had to be escorted from the chapel. For more than two hours, about 250 mourners prayed for, grieved for and shouted about the death a girl many barely knew. The emaciated body of the 15-year-old was found in an apartment on Gregor Way last week. She weighed 73 pounds, and her body was covered with cuts and bruises. Her legal guardian, Satrina Roberts, 31, has been charged with first-degree murder.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2002
Ciara Jobes was just 2 years old when social workers began to worry about her welfare. They were concerned about parental neglect even before her infant sister died of a cocaine overdose. Social workers and court officials kept up supervision on and off for more than a decade, until a judge granted custody of Ciara to a close family friend nearly three years ago. The judge, lawyers and family members felt the decision was the best chance at giving Ciara a normal life after documented neglect at the hands of her parents.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN REPORTER | August 26, 2006
For the life of him, Danny Hunt, 13, couldn't figure out what was going wrong. All morning, he had done flips from a swing hanging 20 feet over a pool at the Beaver Dam Swimming Club, but as the day wore on, the eighth-grader's luck turned bad and his stomach was paying the price. "I'd been doing back flips easily, but now I can't do it," Danny said yesterday. "Now I've just been belly flopping." Undeterred, Danny, along with 11 of his closest friends from Rosa Parks Middle School in Olney, hit the swing again, keeping with their quest to make the final Friday of summer vacation the grandest day of them all. Nathan Craft, 13, said despite the hourlong car ride to get to the pool, "it's the best way to end the summer."
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