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By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 6, 1991
Hey, good lookin'! Whatcha got cookin'?Italian food, naturally. Ciao Bella (which means, approximately, "hi, beautiful") is one of Little Italy's newest restaurants, offering a sort of "greatest hits" version of the typical neighborhood menu. In other words, there's not an overabundance of choice here, but most of the popular favorites on the Italian hit parade make an appearance: antipasto, pastas, seafood, a handful of veal and chicken dishes, and cannoli and rum cake for dessert. No, it isn't novel, but I've stopped looking for novelty in Little Italy; a good minestrone and a well-sauced platter of fettucini are fine with me.Ciao Bella is reasonably "bella" too, in a low-key way. Like the food, the decor -- dark green napery and carpets, red silk roses on the tables, pictures of Venice -- is conservative, but this is hardly a formal place; casual clothes are fine, and our chatty waiter had certainly never been taught that service people should be remote and frosty.
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By GUS G. SENTEMENTES and GUS G. SENTEMENTES,SUN REPORTER | July 10, 2006
As each Italian soccer player prepared to boot his penalty kick, the clapping inside Little Italy's Ciao Bella restaurant grew louder - culminating in cheers with each one scored. With every shot that hit the back of the net for the Italians, men and women jumped around the restaurant, hugging friends and strangers alike. And they rejoiced as a player from the French team missed his crucial kick. That stumble proved a key moment after nearly three hours of tension in Ciao Bella yesterday, and it opened the door for Italy to win its first World Cup title in 24 years.
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NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 5, 2004
If anyone has any doubt that Little Italy is keeping up with the times, consider the bread at Ciao Bella, a nice little restaurant steeped in neighborhood tradition. This is simply a spectacular loaf, crisp-crusted and fresh, with plenty of flavor -- a far cry from the tasteless but mildly enjoyable fluff that used to grace every restaurant table in Little Italy. Bravissimo! We didn't end up cheering about everything, though. We had some good food, but we also had some not-so-good food.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 5, 2004
If anyone has any doubt that Little Italy is keeping up with the times, consider the bread at Ciao Bella, a nice little restaurant steeped in neighborhood tradition. This is simply a spectacular loaf, crisp-crusted and fresh, with plenty of flavor -- a far cry from the tasteless but mildly enjoyable fluff that used to grace every restaurant table in Little Italy. Bravissimo! We didn't end up cheering about everything, though. We had some good food, but we also had some not-so-good food.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 3, 1998
It's a steamy night, the kind that calls out for iced gazpacho or chilled cucumber soup with dill. But we've taken refuge in the polished dining room of Ciao Bella in Little Italy, and that means our soup options are limited to those of the hot Italian variety.I sweat just thinking about ordering the minestrone. But if the kitchen can turn out decent minestrone on a night like this, a night when no sane person would possibly order it, I'd be impressed.I am. Not to make too much out of a bowl of soup, but this is no ordinary minestrone.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2000
Anthony C. Gambino, founder of Ciao Bella Restaurant in Little Italy, where he resided, died of lung cancer yesterday at home. He was 65. In 1991, Mr. Gambino opened his restaurant on South High Street, where he prepared Northern and Southern Italian specialties. Many of the Southern Italian dishes he had learned from his mother, who was born and raised in Palermo, the capital of Sicily. The restaurant's signature dishes included veal Marsala, veal parmigiana and a dish of his own invention called Veal Chesapeake, which features veal and crabmeat.
FEATURES
By MARY MAUSHARD and MARY MAUSHARD,The Evening Sun Ciao Bella The Sun The Pavilion at the Walters The Sunday Sun | September 21, 1991
Perring PlacePerring Place Shopping Center on Perring Parkway, 661-0630. Perring Place, near the end of a strip shopping center just above Northern Parkway, is relaxing, comforting, old-fashioned. Dining here doesn't require high energy. Paneled walls lined with typical restaurant paintings, ersatz Tiffany fixtures, swinging kitchen doors on the back wall -- it's that kind of place, with a bar on one side and a dining room on the other. The food is uncomplicated and reasonably priced. My husband thought the calves liver ($9.95)
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | September 1, 1991
For years a friend of Tony Gambino's greeted him the same way: "Ciao bello," he called when he said hello, and again when he said goodbye.One day, when Mr. Gambino was looking for a name for his restaurant, he heard his friend say hello in the usual way, but the phrase started to echo in his mind."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 30, 2003
A little of Little Italy -- that's what restaurateur David Cangialosi hopes he's bringing to downtown Baltimore. He opened Cangialosi's this week, next door to David & Dad's, the lunchtime eatery and carryout he has owned with his father since 1993. "I wanted Cangialosi's to be a really comfortable, warm, inviting place, and I want people in the neighborhood to come all the time," Cangialosi says. That's why he says he decided against the formality of tablecloths, instead opting for uncovered contemporary wood tables, set on the building's original hardwood floors.
NEWS
By GUS G. SENTEMENTES and GUS G. SENTEMENTES,SUN REPORTER | July 10, 2006
As each Italian soccer player prepared to boot his penalty kick, the clapping inside Little Italy's Ciao Bella restaurant grew louder - culminating in cheers with each one scored. With every shot that hit the back of the net for the Italians, men and women jumped around the restaurant, hugging friends and strangers alike. And they rejoiced as a player from the French team missed his crucial kick. That stumble proved a key moment after nearly three hours of tension in Ciao Bella yesterday, and it opened the door for Italy to win its first World Cup title in 24 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 30, 2003
A little of Little Italy -- that's what restaurateur David Cangialosi hopes he's bringing to downtown Baltimore. He opened Cangialosi's this week, next door to David & Dad's, the lunchtime eatery and carryout he has owned with his father since 1993. "I wanted Cangialosi's to be a really comfortable, warm, inviting place, and I want people in the neighborhood to come all the time," Cangialosi says. That's why he says he decided against the formality of tablecloths, instead opting for uncovered contemporary wood tables, set on the building's original hardwood floors.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2000
Anthony C. Gambino, founder of Ciao Bella Restaurant in Little Italy, where he resided, died of lung cancer yesterday at home. He was 65. In 1991, Mr. Gambino opened his restaurant on South High Street, where he prepared Northern and Southern Italian specialties. Many of the Southern Italian dishes he had learned from his mother, who was born and raised in Palermo, the capital of Sicily. The restaurant's signature dishes included veal Marsala, veal parmigiana and a dish of his own invention called Veal Chesapeake, which features veal and crabmeat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 3, 1998
It's a steamy night, the kind that calls out for iced gazpacho or chilled cucumber soup with dill. But we've taken refuge in the polished dining room of Ciao Bella in Little Italy, and that means our soup options are limited to those of the hot Italian variety.I sweat just thinking about ordering the minestrone. But if the kitchen can turn out decent minestrone on a night like this, a night when no sane person would possibly order it, I'd be impressed.I am. Not to make too much out of a bowl of soup, but this is no ordinary minestrone.
FEATURES
By MARY MAUSHARD and MARY MAUSHARD,The Evening Sun Ciao Bella The Sun The Pavilion at the Walters The Sunday Sun | September 21, 1991
Perring PlacePerring Place Shopping Center on Perring Parkway, 661-0630. Perring Place, near the end of a strip shopping center just above Northern Parkway, is relaxing, comforting, old-fashioned. Dining here doesn't require high energy. Paneled walls lined with typical restaurant paintings, ersatz Tiffany fixtures, swinging kitchen doors on the back wall -- it's that kind of place, with a bar on one side and a dining room on the other. The food is uncomplicated and reasonably priced. My husband thought the calves liver ($9.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 6, 1991
Hey, good lookin'! Whatcha got cookin'?Italian food, naturally. Ciao Bella (which means, approximately, "hi, beautiful") is one of Little Italy's newest restaurants, offering a sort of "greatest hits" version of the typical neighborhood menu. In other words, there's not an overabundance of choice here, but most of the popular favorites on the Italian hit parade make an appearance: antipasto, pastas, seafood, a handful of veal and chicken dishes, and cannoli and rum cake for dessert. No, it isn't novel, but I've stopped looking for novelty in Little Italy; a good minestrone and a well-sauced platter of fettucini are fine with me.Ciao Bella is reasonably "bella" too, in a low-key way. Like the food, the decor -- dark green napery and carpets, red silk roses on the tables, pictures of Venice -- is conservative, but this is hardly a formal place; casual clothes are fine, and our chatty waiter had certainly never been taught that service people should be remote and frosty.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | September 1, 1991
For years a friend of Tony Gambino's greeted him the same way: "Ciao bello," he called when he said hello, and again when he said goodbye.One day, when Mr. Gambino was looking for a name for his restaurant, he heard his friend say hello in the usual way, but the phrase started to echo in his mind."
NEWS
By elizabeth large | September 10, 2008
A reader asked for a list of restaurants that are quiet, relaxing and not too pricey. Here are my suggestions. Note that they are listed in alphabetical order: 1 Ambassador in Homewood: 2 Cafe Troia in Towson: 3 Carlyle Club in Homewood: 4 Ciao Bella in Little Italy: 5 Cynthia's in Severna Park : 6 Dogwood in Hampden : 7 Mia Carolina in Glyndon: 8 Orchard Market & Cafe in Towson: 9 Patrick's in Cockeysville: 10 Spice Company in Homewood:...
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | February 15, 2006
Ellicott City-ites now have more options for dinner - thanks to the new gourmet takeout, Noah's on the Side, just opened by husband-and-wife chefs Sharon and Russel Braitsch. After years of working for Linwood's, Peerce's Plantation, Corks and Savannah, they wanted to open their own restaurant, Sharon Braitsch says. But, once they had a son on the way, they knew they wanted to have enough time to spend with him. "And with restaurant chefs' hours, we knew that was impossible," Braitsch says.
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