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NEWS
March 21, 2013
Drones over Syria? Hold on! ("CIA eyes drone strikes in Syria," March 16). The whole business of drone strikes on nations with whom we are not at war gets murkier and more distasteful daily - and cries out for transparency from the Obama administration on drone practice and policy, especially abroad. U.S. military and CIA attacks by unmanned aircraft have been going on for well over a decade now with little fanfare or even awareness by most Americans. And that's just as Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama have wanted it. Sure, the news is trumpeted when some al-Qaida or Taliban leader has been a "kill" by a targeted missile strike.
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NEWS
January 11, 2013
The CIA is probably smug and triumphant about its duplicitous vaccination drive in Abbotabad, a mission hatched to catch and kill Osama bin Laden ("A tainted polio program," Jan. 7). As a doctor, I cringe to think of this unscrupulous use of medicine for murder. While the London Guardian investigated the matter and revealed its unethical intricacies, it is amazing that not one American newspaper thought the CIA's vaccination plot was worthy of further scrutiny. The vaccination drive was against Hepatitis B, a deadly and common disease in the Third World, spread by contaminated needles, surgical instruments and tainted blood.
NEWS
January 7, 2013
Whether Chuck Hagel and John Brennan are the ideal men to lead the Pentagon and CIA remains to be seen. We need the exercise of a through vetting in Senate confirmation hearings, and certainly an examination of the nominees' past statements and actions is warranted. But the objections raised about Mr. Hagel so far, and to a lesser extent, Mr. Brennan, sound a lot more like an attempt to score political points than an effort to get at the key questions that will face the leaders of two of the nation's most crucial agencies.
NEWS
By Lynn R. Goldman and Michael J. Klag | January 7, 2013
The news that the Central Intelligence Agency had been running a fake vaccination program in Pakistan first surfaced in 2011 and quickly ignited fears that the covert operation could compromise the global campaign to eradicate polio. Late last month, a handful of vaccine workers, including a teenage girl, paid the price for the CIA's deceit: They were gunned down as they tried to give the polio vaccine to children living in the Pakistani city of Karachi and other areas. No one has taken responsibility for the attacks, although the Pakistani Taliban has threatened vaccine workers in the past.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Emily Kline | December 17, 2012
The finale of “Homeland” Season 2 was an appropriately epic and totally off the wall conclusion to a narrative arc that prioritized constant, edge-of-your-seat dramatic momentum, even at the occasional cost of believability. First, the basics: The episode began at Carrie's aunt's picturesque cabin in the woods, the two lovebirds finally free to juggle produce and watch the sunset together. It's clear that Quinn is stalking them at their hideout, but they seem oblivious. They feel so safe that when Brody unearths a handgun in the cabin, Carrie removes the bullets and shoves the weapon back in the drawer.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | December 17, 2012
Jeanne Vertefeuille and Sandra Grimes could be George Smiley's people. They were recruited on their college campuses by the Central Intelligence Agency during the height of the Cold War. Jeanne wanted travel and adventure. Sandy didn't know much about the CIA; she just needed a job. Jeanne and Sandy. That's how they refer to themselves in the book they co-authored, "Circle of Treason. " It tells the story of these two women - Jeanne worked her way up from the equivalent of the steno pool, while Sandy was immediately in the Soviet division (and over her head)
NEWS
November 21, 2012
Susan Reimer 's column, "Surprising reaction to L'affaire Petraeus," (Nov. 15), brings up a number of salient points, most notably that male readers in large part thought that Gen. David Petraeus took the honorable, necessary course of action, while women who responded pointed out that chief executives of the past often had affairs but managed to carry out their duties. Ms. Reimer sums up her readers' feelings on General Petraeus and his philandering with the following: "With all due respect ... that has nothing to do with my oath of office, and it's none of your business.
NEWS
November 13, 2012
Like a set of Russian dolls, in which each doll contains a slightly smaller version of itself hidden inside, the sex scandal that forced CIA Director David Petraeus from office last week seems full of secret compartments that have yet to be revealed. Since Friday, we've been deluged with tantalizing details about the affair between Mr. Petraeus, 60, and Paula Broadwell, 40, a former Army officer and married mother of two who published a fawning biography of him this year. But there are still too many pieces of this puzzle that just don't seem to fit. Initial reports indicated that Mr. Petraeus had stepped down after FBI investigators uncovered the relationship between him and Ms. Broadwell while pursuing a complaint about harassing emails sent anonymously to a another woman, Jill Kelley, who was described as a friend of Mr. Petraeus and his wife.
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