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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2012
Stanley A. Ciesielski, a retired career Central Intelligence Agency intelligence officer who was a co-founder of the Polish Heritage Association of Maryland, died Monday of lung cancer at a niece's home in Hampstead. He was 101. "Stanley Ciesielski was a great friend and adviser. I knew him through our work in the Polish community," said Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, a longtime friend. "He was a great patriot fighting for the freedom of Poland. He was one of the founders of the Polish Heritage Society, whose purpose was to support the Solidarity movement, particularly during those dark days of martial law," she said.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2012
Stanley A. Ciesielski, a retired career Central Intelligence Agency intelligence officer who was a co-founder of the Polish Heritage Association of Maryland, died Monday of lung cancer at a niece's home in Hampstead. He was 101. "Stanley Ciesielski was a great friend and adviser. I knew him through our work in the Polish community," said Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, a longtime friend. "He was a great patriot fighting for the freedom of Poland. He was one of the founders of the Polish Heritage Society, whose purpose was to support the Solidarity movement, particularly during those dark days of martial law," she said.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 10, 2004
WASHINGTON - A federal judge held a reporter for Time magazine in contempt of court yesterday for refusing to testify before a grand jury investigating the leak of the identity of a covert CIA officer. In an order issued July 20 but not made public until yesterday, U.S. District Judge Thomas F. Hogan ruled that Matthew Cooper of Time and Meet the Press host Tim Russert were required to testify "regarding alleged conversations they had with a specified executive branch official." NBC News issued a statement saying that Russert already had been interviewed under oath by prosecutors on Saturday under an agreement to avoid a protracted court fight.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2010
The return of "Mad Men" last week already makes AMC the place to go Sunday nights for the finest drama on television this summer. Tonight comes a second reason to choose this cable channel, with the two-hour debut of "Rubicon," a richly textured conspiracy thriller created by three-time Peabody Award-winner Henry Bromell, a writer well-known to Baltimore audiences from the years when he lived and worked here as an executive producer of "Homicide: Life...
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2001
The first American to die in combat in Afghanistan was a Central Intelligence Agency paramilitary officer killed Sunday during a bloody revolt by al-Qaida and Taliban prisoners in a mud-walled fortress near Mazar-e Sharif, the CIA said yesterday. The death of Johnny Micheal "Mike" Spann, 32, underscored the key role CIA paramilitary officers are playing in guiding U.S. attacks, interrogating prisoners and tracking Osama Bin Laden. The agency's deployment on the ground in Afghanistan is the largest since the war in Vietnam and signals a new, more assertive CIA role in battling terrorism, government officials and outside experts say. "This is not any longer a passive agency devoted to quietly collecting and analyzing data," said Ted Gup, a veteran journalist and author of a book on CIA operatives' deaths.
NEWS
By The New York Times | July 20, 2008
"Fair Game: How a Top Spy Was Betrayed by Her Own Government" by Valerie Plame Wilson Simon & Schuster / 413 pages / $15 Columnist Robert Novak destroyed Valerie Plame Wilson's career when he identified her as a CIA officer in 2003, and she wrote this book both to settle scores and to support her family. After reviewing the manuscript, the CIA demanded many deletions; the book includes the censor's marks as well as an afterword by reporter Laura Rozen, who uses the public record to fill in the gaps.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 11, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Philip Agee, a renegade CIA officer who has conducted a long-running public crusade against the agency, has taken money repeatedly from the Cuban intelligence service, according to a high-ranking Cuban defector and two senior CIA officials.The money was provided to Cuba by the KGB, the former Soviet spy agency now reorganized under Russia's control, specifically support Mr. Agee, said Florintino Aspillaga Lombard, who served as a major in Cuba's Direccion General de Inteligencia, or DGI, before his defection.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 24, 2001
WASHINGTON - As FBI director Louis Freeh considered expanding the use of polygraph tests to root out possible spies, some criticism arose yesterday over his earlier choice of former FBI and CIA Director William Webster to tell him what went wrong. Webster headed the FBI when Robert Hanssen is accused of having begun his espionage career for Moscow and the CIA while convicted spy Aldrich Ames worked there undetected, critics noted. So he may be as much to blame as anyone, they say, and ill-suited to take an impartial look at the FBI's security lapses.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2000
Robert Morris Coffin, an artist, teacher, CIA officer and wartime cartographer who helped design maps of the French coast at Normandy in preparation for the D-Day invasion, died of pneumonia Tuesday at Calvert Memorial Hospital in Prince Frederick. He was 87. Mr. Coffin was born in St. Mary's, Ohio, the son of a judge. He attended Miami University and University of New Mexico, studying art, anthropology and archaeology. He received a master's degree from Ohio State University, where he met his wife, the former Jane Peter, and where he was teaching when World War II began.
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | November 10, 2005
In an attempt to put an embarrassing episode behind it, The New York Times announced yesterday the retirement of Judith Miller, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter whose involvement in the leak of a CIA officer's name led to the indictment of a high-ranking member of the Bush White House. The announcement, newspaper officials said, came after weeks of negotiations spurred by the realization that Miller's reporting techniques had been less than scrupulous. Nevertheless, the paper's publisher, Arthur O. Sulzberger Jr., and its editor, Bill Keller, praised her in statements issued yesterday.
NEWS
By The New York Times | July 20, 2008
"Fair Game: How a Top Spy Was Betrayed by Her Own Government" by Valerie Plame Wilson Simon & Schuster / 413 pages / $15 Columnist Robert Novak destroyed Valerie Plame Wilson's career when he identified her as a CIA officer in 2003, and she wrote this book both to settle scores and to support her family. After reviewing the manuscript, the CIA demanded many deletions; the book includes the censor's marks as well as an afterword by reporter Laura Rozen, who uses the public record to fill in the gaps.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 20, 2008
WASHINGTON -- When Jose A. Rodriguez Jr. came under investigation for ordering the destruction of CIA interrogation videotapes, one of his first calls was to a small Virginia insurance company that thrives on government trouble. Like a growing number of CIA employees, Rodriguez, former head of the agency's clandestine service, had bought professional liability insurance from Wright & Co. The insurer, founded in 1965 by a former FBI agent, is now paying his mounting legal bills. The standard Wright policy costs a little less than $300 a year.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,Los Angeles Times | March 17, 2007
WASHINGTON -- With a phalanx of cameras awaiting her entrance, Valerie Plame stepped out of the shadows of the spy world and into the spotlight. For nearly four years, Plame had been a silent, Garbo-like figure at the center of one of Washington's most consuming scandals. Her unmasking as a CIA officer became a case study of the brutal politics of the Iraq war, and it launched a criminal probe that led to the conviction of a top White House official. Yesterday, Plame finally offered her inside account, testifying before a congressional committee that she felt as though she had been "hit in the gut" when her once-secret identity appeared in the press and accusing the Bush administration of "recklessly" blowing her cover.
NEWS
By Richard B. Schmitt and Richard B. Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Meet the Press moderator Tim Russert testified yesterday that he never gave former vice presidential aide I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby information about the wife of a Bush administration war critic, contradicting the premise of Libby's defense of perjury charges. Russert became the third journalist in the federal court trial to offer testimony that counters statements that Libby told investigators and a grand jury probing the outing of CIA operative Valerie Plame. The conversations - and alleged lies that Libby offered about them - form the crux of his perjury and obstruction indictment.
NEWS
By GREG MILLER and GREG MILLER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Despite the CIA's goal of cracking down on leaks of classified information, the government may forgo criminal charges against a senior agency officer fired last week for disclosing operational secrets, according to current and former intelligence and law enforcement officials. The officials cited a series of obstacles to pursuing the case, including the fact that the employee was fired in part over polygraph results that would not be admissible as evidence, and that she is accused of leaking secrets the government would be loath to air in court.
NEWS
By GREG MILLER and GREG MILLER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 22, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The CIA has fired a senior officer for leaking classified information to news organizations, including material for Pulitzer Prize-winning stories in The Washington Post that said the agency maintained a secret network of prisons overseas for terrorism suspects. The firing, announced yesterday, is the latest crackdown on CIA and Bush administration officials accused of unauthorized disclosures of classified information. The CIA would not disclose the identity of the officer who was fired, citing Privacy Act protections.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 25, 2005
. I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby Jr., Vice President Dick Cheney's chief of staff, first learned about the CIA officer at the heart of the leak investigation in a conversation with Cheney weeks before her identity became public in 2003, lawyers involved in the case said yesterday. Notes of the previously undisclosed conversation between Libby and Cheney on June 12, 2003, appear to differ from Libby's testimony to a federal grand jury that he initially learned about the CIA officer, Valerie Plame, from journalists, the lawyers said.
NEWS
By PAUL RICHTER and PAUL RICHTER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 29, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Vice President Dick Cheney appears as no more than a background character in the indictment of his chief of staff, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby Jr.. Yet even that secondary role raises questions about whether Cheney played any part in the alleged effort to discredit an administration critic. And as the Libby case moves forward, it is likely to focus more attention on the vice president's position as one of the most powerful behind-the-scenes figures in government. The five-count federal indictment says Cheney talked to Libby about the fact that Valerie Plame - the wife of Joseph C. Wilson IV, a former U.S. ambassador and administration critic - was a CIA operative.
NEWS
December 25, 2005
Jay Donald LaMar, a retired intelligence officer in the CIA whose work took him around the world, died Dec. 18 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care of complications from diabetes and the flu. He was 72 and lived in Timonium. "He was so patriotic," said Priscilla LaMar, his wife of 23 years. "Every morning he would tell me that he was off to fight communism. He never thought he'd outlive it." Mr. LaMar was born in Jacksonville, Fla. He graduated from Bladensburg High School and Western Maryland College in 1955 with a degree in English.
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | November 10, 2005
In an attempt to put an embarrassing episode behind it, The New York Times announced yesterday the retirement of Judith Miller, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter whose involvement in the leak of a CIA officer's name led to the indictment of a high-ranking member of the Bush White House. The announcement, newspaper officials said, came after weeks of negotiations spurred by the realization that Miller's reporting techniques had been less than scrupulous. Nevertheless, the paper's publisher, Arthur O. Sulzberger Jr., and its editor, Bill Keller, praised her in statements issued yesterday.
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