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By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,Tribune Washington Bureau | January 16, 2009
WASHINGTON - Outgoing CIA Director Michael V. Hayden said yesterday that the most pressing issues facing his successor include Iran's pursuit of a nuclear weapon and surging violence in Mexico - but not the war in Iraq. Hayden also defended the agency's use of harsh interrogation methods and said he had advised the incoming administration against going too far in dismantling the agency's counterterrorism programs. "These techniques worked," Hayden said of the agency's interrogation program during a farewell session with reporters who cover the CIA. "One needs to be very careful" about eliminating CIA authorities, he said, because "if you create barriers to doing things ... there's no wink, no nod, no secret handshake.
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NEWS
November 13, 2012
Like a set of Russian dolls, in which each doll contains a slightly smaller version of itself hidden inside, the sex scandal that forced CIA Director David Petraeus from office last week seems full of secret compartments that have yet to be revealed. Since Friday, we've been deluged with tantalizing details about the affair between Mr. Petraeus, 60, and Paula Broadwell, 40, a former Army officer and married mother of two who published a fawning biography of him this year. But there are still too many pieces of this puzzle that just don't seem to fit. Initial reports indicated that Mr. Petraeus had stepped down after FBI investigators uncovered the relationship between him and Ms. Broadwell while pursuing a complaint about harassing emails sent anonymously to a another woman, Jill Kelley, who was described as a friend of Mr. Petraeus and his wife.
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NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1998
Uncle Sam wants you, only it means a $4 million pay cut -- including guaranteed bonuses -- over the next year. What do you do?If you're A. B. "Buzzy" Krongard, you jump at it.Krongard said yesterday that he will leave Bankers Trust New York Corp. to join the Central Intelligence Agency, where he will be counselor to the director of the agency."I believe in the United States; at the age of 61, if ever I am going to make a change, it's now," Krongard said in an interview."I have an opportunity to pay back some of the benefits that I've had from being a citizen."
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | November 10, 2012
"All In" is the title of the David Petraeus biography, and no book is more aptly titled. His caree is now in a shambles because he made a big, disasterous bet -- having an affair with co-author Paula Broadwell -- and it led to his resignation as CIA director. The affair also sullies the book by Broadwell and Washington Post editor Vernon Loeb, which was highly praised. The prurient may read it, for clues to the Petraeus/Broadwell relationship. But how can anyone else now believe it is an objective account of his personality and leadership?
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Laura Sullivan and Tom Bowman and Laura Sullivan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 4, 2004
WASHINGTON - CIA Director George J. Tenet, the embattled head of an intelligence agency that has been under fire for failing to detect the Sept. 11 plot and for insisting that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction that have yet to be found, resigned abruptly yesterday. Tenet, a gregarious appointee of President Bill Clinton and an adroit political survivor who has led the spy agency for seven years, said in a letter of resignation to President Bush that he was leaving for personal reasons.
NEWS
By Tim Weiner and Owen Ullmann and Tim Weiner and Owen Ullmann,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 22, 1991
WASHINGTON -- CIA Director William H. Webster has been excluded from President Bush's war councils throughout the Persian Gulf crisis and is under attack by White House andcongressional critics as an ineffective spymaster.Mr. Webster's detractors fault the quality of intelligence he has provided on Iraq and his overall management of the sprawling U.S. intelligence community, which encompasses the CIA and 11 other secret agencies.The congressional intelligence committees have publicly criticized the way the intelligence agencies are managed, citing spotty analyses, overlapping and uncoordinated missions and redundancies that waste billions of dollars.
NEWS
By Melvin A. Goodman | November 19, 2004
PRESIDENT HARRY S. Truman created the Central Intelligence Agency in 1947 to coordinate the various assessments of the intelligence community and to place the CIA outside the policy community. In this way, Mr. Truman wanted to encourage competitive analysis within the intelligence community and to make sure that policy-makers did not tailor intelligence to suit their interests. Over the years, there have been many attempts to politicize intelligence. But no government has been so blatant as the Bush administration, which used phony intelligence to justify the war against Iraq and has introduced a new director of central intelligence, Porter J. Goss, to conduct a political housecleaning at the highest levels of the agency.
NEWS
By GREG MILLER and GREG MILLER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 6, 2005
WASHINGTON -- CIA Director Porter J. Goss said yesterday that he would not consider punishing agency officials for failures leading up to the Sept. 11 attacks, rejecting pressure from lawmakers, victims' families and the CIA inspector general to hold those responsible for well-documented breakdowns accountable. Goss ruled out disciplinary action against former CIA Director George J. Tenet and at least 11 other current and former agency officials who were identified in an internal investigation as being responsible for lapses leading up to the deadly attacks.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Shogren and Elizabeth Shogren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 12, 2004
WASHINGTON - The leaders of the Senate intelligence committee urged President Bush yesterday to quickly name a new CIA director because of the risk of another terrorist attack on U.S. soil. "There are a number of people who have an extraordinary background that the president could send up and that we could get confirmed," Sen. Pat Roberts, the Kansas Republican who chairs the Select Committee on Intelligence, said on NBC's Meet the Press. Sen. John D. Rockefeller IV of West Virginia, the committee's top Democrat, told Fox News Sunday that "during such a dangerous period for the United States" it would be "unacceptable" to leave the job vacant until after the election.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. intelligence community has begun grappling with one of the most contentious and far-reaching issues it is likely to face in the next few years -- whether to let other countries buy American-made reconnaissance satellites, which ultimately could be used for spying against U.S. forces or allies.Several countries are eager to buy high-resolution satellites from American companies. The businesses, which have supporters in Congress and the U.S. Commerce Department, point out that the sales could mean hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue for U.S. industries trying to survive the recession and defense-industry downsizing.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,Tribune Washington Bureau | January 16, 2009
WASHINGTON - Outgoing CIA Director Michael V. Hayden said yesterday that the most pressing issues facing his successor include Iran's pursuit of a nuclear weapon and surging violence in Mexico - but not the war in Iraq. Hayden also defended the agency's use of harsh interrogation methods and said he had advised the incoming administration against going too far in dismantling the agency's counterterrorism programs. "These techniques worked," Hayden said of the agency's interrogation program during a farewell session with reporters who cover the CIA. "One needs to be very careful" about eliminating CIA authorities, he said, because "if you create barriers to doing things ... there's no wink, no nod, no secret handshake.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 27, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The top two U.S. intelligence officials traveled secretly to Pakistan early this month to press President Pervez Musharraf to allow the CIA greater latitude to operate in the tribal territories where al-Qaida, the Taliban and other militant groups are all active, according to several officials who have been briefed on the visit. But in the unannounced meetings on Jan. 9 with the two U.S. officials -- Mike McConnell, the director of national intelligence, and Gen. Michael V. Hayden, the CIA director -- Musharraf rebuffed proposals to expand any U.S. combat presence in Pakistan, either through unilateral covert CIA missions or by joint operations with Pakistani security forces.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Lawmakers leading the Senate investigation of the CIA's destruction of interrogation videotapes said there were gaps in the testimony of CIA Director Michael V. Hayden yesterday and outlined plans to call a series of witnesses as part of an expanding probe. "We had a useful and not yet complete hearing," said West Virginia Sen. John D. Rockefeller IV, the chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, in comments after the 90-minute, closed-door session with the CIA director.
NEWS
By Josh Meyer and Josh Meyer,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Three top U.S. intelligence officials said yesterday that a resurgent al-Qaida had stepped up training and worldwide operations from havens in Pakistan, a development they worry could lead to ambitious new attacks. But the CIA's director for intelligence, John Kringen, and other counterterrorism officials played down recent news reports and comments from Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff that suggested there was a heightened risk of an al-Qaida attack on the United States this summer, saying they had no intelligence about such a strike.
NEWS
By Siobhan Gorman and Siobhan Gorman,Sun reporter | May 1, 2007
WASHINGTON -- In the most detailed accounting to date of the origins of the National Security Agency's warrantless surveillance program, former CIA Director George J. Tenet says the effort was started at the urging of Vice President Dick Cheney. In his new book released yesterday, Tenet mounts a lengthy defense of the program, noting that he regularly tracked reviews of the intelligence leads it produced. However, he also contends that CIA interrogations of detainees were more effective than any other tool that U.S. intelligence agencies had at their disposal.
NEWS
By Melvin A. Goodman | November 10, 2006
Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld's resignation has unloaded a great deal of unwelcome baggage for the Bush administration, but the nomination of Robert M. Gates is unlikely to help resolve the disastrous war in Iraq or the uniformed military's opposition to the civilian leadership at the Pentagon. Unlike successful secretaries of defense in the recent past, Mr. Gates lacks essential experience in military and industrial affairs and has had serious problems with the congressional confirmation process.
NEWS
July 29, 1994
Trying to figure out what the Central Intelligence Agency is up to is a lot like watching shadows on the wall. The shadow may be larger than the reality, or it may be conjured out of nothing. The CIA's relatively new director promises a series of changes in the agency's structure and "culture," in response both to the end of the Cold War and the discovery of a traitor in its midst. What does it all mean?Some things are fairly obvious. The agency seriously botched the Aldrich Ames case, ignoring for years warning signals he might be spying on the U.S. rather than for it. It needs to justify its whopping cost at a time of fiscal stringency and declining global tension.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Lawmakers leading the Senate investigation of the CIA's destruction of interrogation videotapes said there were gaps in the testimony of CIA Director Michael V. Hayden yesterday and outlined plans to call a series of witnesses as part of an expanding probe. "We had a useful and not yet complete hearing," said West Virginia Sen. John D. Rockefeller IV, the chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, in comments after the 90-minute, closed-door session with the CIA director.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,Sun Reporter | November 9, 2006
WASHINGTON --President Bush, stung by election losses that he acknowledged were a rebuke of the Iraq war, dismissed Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld yesterday and named former CIA Director Robert M. Gates to replace him. Conceding that voters spurned Republicans in part "to register their displeasure with the lack of progress" in Iraq, Bush said at a White House news conference that there was a need for "new leadership" and "fresh perspective" at...
NEWS
By SIOBHAN GORMAN and SIOBHAN GORMAN,SUN REPORTER | May 8, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's choice of Gen. Michael V. Hayden as the next CIA director drew bipartisan criticism yesterday, including from the Republican leader of the House Intelligence Committee, who said a military man should not run the intelligence agency. Hayden, whose nomination Bush is expected to announce this morning, has served for more than 35 years in the Air Force, culminating as head of the National Security Agency and then as top deputy to John D. Negroponte, the director of national intelligence.
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