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NEWS
January 11, 2013
The CIA is probably smug and triumphant about its duplicitous vaccination drive in Abbotabad, a mission hatched to catch and kill Osama bin Laden ("A tainted polio program," Jan. 7). As a doctor, I cringe to think of this unscrupulous use of medicine for murder. While the London Guardian investigated the matter and revealed its unethical intricacies, it is amazing that not one American newspaper thought the CIA's vaccination plot was worthy of further scrutiny. The vaccination drive was against Hepatitis B, a deadly and common disease in the Third World, spread by contaminated needles, surgical instruments and tainted blood.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 3, 2014
The Senate Intelligence Committee voted today to declassify portions of its report on the CIA's use of "enhanced interrogation techniques" to extract information from terrorist detainees, but portions of the work that have been leaked appear to confirm Americans' worst fears about the secret program. Committee investigators found that the brutal treatment of prisoners was far more widespread than the agency has admitted and that CIA officials deliberately misled Congress about the effectiveness of methods that brought shame on the nation and amounted to little more than torture by another name.
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NEWS
November 21, 2012
Susan Reimer 's column, "Surprising reaction to L'affaire Petraeus," (Nov. 15), brings up a number of salient points, most notably that male readers in large part thought that Gen. David Petraeus took the honorable, necessary course of action, while women who responded pointed out that chief executives of the past often had affairs but managed to carry out their duties. Ms. Reimer sums up her readers' feelings on General Petraeus and his philandering with the following: "With all due respect ... that has nothing to do with my oath of office, and it's none of your business.
NEWS
March 19, 2014
Thanks for publishing the report that CIA officer Jonathan Bank was suspended because of his "management style" in the Iran operations division ( "CIA official punished after probe finds he created hostile workplace," March 17). More interesting, Mr. Bank was previously the station chief in Islamabad, Pakistan and "was pulled out" as his name was leaked to the media. Most interesting, "U.S. officials think Pakistan's intelligence service leaked the name in a dispute over CIA drone attacks in the country's tribal belt.
NEWS
April 3, 2014
The Senate Intelligence Committee voted today to declassify portions of its report on the CIA's use of "enhanced interrogation techniques" to extract information from terrorist detainees, but portions of the work that have been leaked appear to confirm Americans' worst fears about the secret program. Committee investigators found that the brutal treatment of prisoners was far more widespread than the agency has admitted and that CIA officials deliberately misled Congress about the effectiveness of methods that brought shame on the nation and amounted to little more than torture by another name.
NEWS
October 6, 1991
Compared to the toppling of Felix Dzerzhinsky's monumental statue outside the KGB building in Moscow last August, the CIA's humiliations during the Robert Gates hearings are more than bearable. They are well-deserved and potentially salutary. If the CIA is to transform itself into an intelligence agency relevant to a world in which the KBG is ostensibly coming in from the cold, the agency at Langley, Va., will have to rid itself of a lot of obsessions, habits, feuds and infighting.Americans were understandably transfixed during the past week's televised Senate hearings in which the CIA's dirty laundry was hung out to dry. It was ostensibly a battle between CIA analysts who accused Mr. Gates of slanting intelligence estimates -- a practice he once described as contrary to "the single deepest ethical and cultural principle of the CIA" -- and those who held he is well qualified to be Director of Central Intelligence.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2012
The report from the State Department was brief: Thomas M. Jennings Jr., a federal worker from Burtonsville on a temporary assignment with NATO peacekeepers, had died in a car crash in Southern Bosnia. Fifteen years later, it turns out that was only part of the story. Unknown to neighbors and friends, Jennings was working for the CIA, the agency acknowledged last week. A veteran covert officer — he told acquaintances he worked for the State Department — he volunteered to go to Sarajevo after the Bosnian war as a U.S.-led force worked to maintain peace.
NEWS
March 19, 2014
Thanks for publishing the report that CIA officer Jonathan Bank was suspended because of his "management style" in the Iran operations division ( "CIA official punished after probe finds he created hostile workplace," March 17). More interesting, Mr. Bank was previously the station chief in Islamabad, Pakistan and "was pulled out" as his name was leaked to the media. Most interesting, "U.S. officials think Pakistan's intelligence service leaked the name in a dispute over CIA drone attacks in the country's tribal belt.
NEWS
April 30, 2013
Though he did not participate in torture, ex-CIA agent John Kiriakou was the first person to publicly acknowledge the Bush administration's inhumane abuse of detainees ("The truth about torture," April 23). Mr. Kiriakou's disclosures informed the public and encouraged debate that helped pull this country back from a very dark place. But in doing so he drew the ire of the government, which began to harass and intimidate him and his family under both the Bush and Obama administrations, looking for ways to prosecute him. Finally, when Mr. Kiriakou privately shared a colleague's name to a journalist for use as a source, the government seized the opportunity and threw the book at him. Mr. Kiriakou is now serving 30 months in prison.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2013
Former South Carolina Governor Mark Sanford has been elected to the House (or at least that's where we hear he's going). Welcome to your trends report for Monday, May 8, 2013. Sanford will head to Capitol Hill after facing off against Elizabeth Colbert Busch, sister of the late-night satirist Stephen Colbert. Republicans will hold 233 of the House's 435 seats when Sanford is sworn in, probably this week. Another trip to the House comes today, when former diplomat Gregory Hicks is scheduled to testify about the Benghazi attacks last year.
NEWS
March 12, 2014
California Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who chairs the Senate Intelligence Committee, has long been known as one of the U.S. intelligence community's staunchest defenders. So when an outraged Ms. Feinstein appeared on the Senate floor Tuesday to denounce the CIA and its director, John Brennan, for stealing documents from her committee's computers, spying on its activities and attempting to intimidate committee staffers investigating the agency's treatment of terrorist detainees after the Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
When the CIA's chief lawyer, John Rizzo, first came across the term "enhanced interrogation technique" shortly after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, he was struck by the phrase's deceptive blandness. The words sounded mild, possibly even salutary. But Rizzo knew they referred to the harshest methods used to elicit information from suspected terrorists in custody, including waterboarding, which mimics the experience of drowning. For Rizzo and others, the "EITs", as they were called, were repugnant but necessary for ensuring the nation's safety.
NEWS
By Matteo Faini | January 7, 2014
Fifty years ago, Harry Truman wrote an article in the Washington Post expressing his disappointment over what the Central Intelligence Agency had become. He had established the CIA in 1947 to provide his office with objective information. But it had since "been diverted from its original assignment," Truman wrote, and "become an operational and at times a policy-making arm of the government ... injected into peacetime cloak and dagger operations. " He wanted the CIA to be restored to its original intelligence function and asked "that its operational duties be terminated or properly used elsewhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
Emily Kline and For The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
I have several friends who have given up on "Homeland. " It's true that Season 2 was clunky, overwrought, and loose with many details. We made fun of its many moments of melodramatic dialogue, terrible acting and difficult-to-believe plot twists. Brody's romantic send-off into the woods, in particular, strained my own willingness to suspend disbelief. But I want to tell these friends to come back! Join me! Season 3 has gradually turned up the heat and is now at a rolling boil.
ENTERTAINMENT
Emily Kline and For The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
Spies, drones, runaways, yoga and kidnapping: episode five had it all. The episode was framed by Saul's duck-hunting trip with the old boys network of DC. Invited by the White House chief of staff, Saul assumes that he was there to network with his colleagues in his possibly permanent role as the CIA director. Instead, he is “ambushed” by Senator Lockhart, who informs Saul that the Berenstein intelligence era would be cut short and that Lockhart would soon be nominated to take his place as the agency's head.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
It is hard to imagine any city in the nation being more reviled by Americans these days than Washington. The standoff last week among the White House, Senate and House of Representatives as the clock wound down on the country's ability to pay its bills was yet another example of the partisan posturing and dysfunction that so dominates life in the nation's capital. Meanwhile, our leading news channels have become more ideologically oriented and less interested in helping viewers sort through the self-serving lies and spin.
NEWS
May 10, 1991
The reduction of U.S.-Soviet tensions after policy changes in Moscow has strong implications for American strategic arms spending. But it never meant less need for the intelligence community in general or the Central Intelligence Agency in particular. In a confused and fast-changing world, the U.S. requires better intelligence information and analysis than ever. Iraq's invasion of Kuwait showed that. So does the power struggle between the Russian and Soviet governments.William H. Webster, who is stepping down as director of central intelligence at the age of 67, took the job to rescue the CIA in 1987.
NEWS
November 24, 1996
John M. Deutch, director of the Central Intelligence Agency, appeared Nov. 15 at a town meeting in Watts to discuss allegations that CIA-backed contra rebels sold crack cocaine in Los Angeles' black neighborhoods to fund their covert war in Nicaragua. Here is his opening statement: Thank you, Congresswoman [Juanita] Millender-McDonald, for holding this public meeting, for giving me the opportunity to talk with members of this community about charges that the CIA introduced crack cocaine into South Central Los Angeles in the mid-1980s.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | June 13, 2013
The life of an independent bookstore owner is perilous these days. Having to fend off deadly competition from giant Barnes & Noble, online merchants such as Amazon, and big box stores including Target and Walmart. Still, even with that cut-throat atmosphere, you wouldn't imagine that an indie owner could end up near the top of the Central Intelligence Agency. Until Avril D. Haines came along. Haines, the former co-owner of Adrian's Book Cafe in Baltimore's Fells Point neighborhood, has been named CIA deputy director, the number two position in the spy agency, The Baltimore Sun's John Fritze notes.
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