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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
City homicide detectives were investigating the discovery of a body that appeared to have gone down the trash chute of a downtown apartment building. An unidentified man's body was discovered in a trash compactor in the 200 block of N. Charles St. at about 10:15 a.m. Thursday by building employees, said Anthony Guglielmi, the police department's chief spokesman. Guglielmi said a preliminary review showed no obvious signs of foul play or trauma, but detectives were awaiting the results of an autopsy by the state medical examiner's office.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann | April 2, 2012
It remains one two of the more bizarre and mysterious deaths in Baltimore -- two people on successive years, 2010 and 2011, plunged down a trash chute in the same downtown apartment building -- the Park Charles high-rise. And we still have no idea what happened in either case. Police called the first one -- of 30-year-old Harsh Kumar, an apparent accident. He worked for a technology company and attended Johns Hopkins University. But then came Emily Hauze, a 23-year-old Loyola University Maryland graduate.
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FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer | February 17, 1994
One day, Carolyn Chute will write a novel that will be discussed on its own merits. No mention of her unlikely best-selling debut, "The Beans of Egypt, Maine." No need to remind readers that she was a high school dropout, married to an illiterate man and all too familiar with the impoverished Maine landscape she documented.One day, but not yet. With the publication of "Merry Men," a 695-page epic, Ms. Chute's life is still inextricably linked with her art. This fiercely ambitious novel should change that.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2011
Last year, when a man was killed after going down a trash chute in downtown Baltimore's Park Charles apartment building, residents grudgingly accepted the police conclusion that the death was a bizarre accident. But after a recent Loyola University Maryland graduate — identified by police as 23-year-old Emily Hauze — died in a similar way Sunday, people who live in the Charles Center high-rise are not sure whether to believe that the deaths could be a tragic coincidence. "You wouldn't think that it could happen again," said Phillip Flanders, a 26-year-old graduate engineering student at the Johns Hopkins University who has lived on the building's ninth floor through both deaths.
NEWS
By Elisha King and Elisha King,Evening Sun Staff | July 25, 1991
"I started praying, 'Lord, get me out of here!'" Sandy Lifsey said. "And I was hollering to my friend Linda to pull me out."The reason city resident Sandy Lifsey, 29, was praying and hollering yesterday was that she fell down a trash incinerator chute while searching for a partial dental plate she had accidentally dropped down the chute while emptying her garbage.Firefighters rescued her about 9:20 a.m. with hardly a scratch.Lifsey lives on the 11th floor of 200 Aisquith St. After she emptied the garbage and saw her upper dental plate fall on top of the garbage, she decided to retrieve it.She said she leaned in, became stuck, then fell headfirst from the 9th floor into the chute, which runs from the basement to the 12th floor.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Scott Wilson contributed to this article | May 26, 1996
A 32-year-old Glen Burnie man was killed at a U.S. Gypsum plant in Southeast Baltimore yesterday morning after he fell into a chute in which rocks are dumped before being crushed for wallboard.Brian Arnold of the 600 block of Washington Ave. was working at the plant in the 5500 block of Quarantine Road when the accident happened. No one witnessed the 1 a.m. incident, plant officials said."Obviously, we're deeply saddened," said Matt Gonring, spokesman for U.S. Gypsum. "Our first priority is a safe workplace.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 2, 2002
WASHINGTON - Future escapees from high-rise disasters might find themselves hurtling to safety down giant, inflated chutes if a well-connected Israeli company makes good on its invention. The Advanced Modular Evacuation System, which looks like a giant elephant trunk hanging down from a building, is intended to rescue people who are stuck above the reach of a hook-and-ladder. According to its manufacturer, upgrades of the device someday could rescue people from 100 floors above the street.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | May 15, 1995
Randy Ridgely, 27, stood in the rain for hours yesterday, got soaked with mud and got thrown onto the horn of a 2,000-pound horn. Still, it was a great day.Great because with room for 1,900 people in the bleachers at Howard County's first professional rodeo, hundreds couldn't find a seat, let alone a dry one. An hour before Bull Blast '95 started, a third of the seats were filled with spectators who didn't mind the pouring rain.The rain let up at the County Fairgrounds in West Friendship, and the rock-and-roll beganElvis Presley's "Jailhouse Rock," Steppenwolf's "Born to Be Wild" and other classic rock tunes blasted from the speakers above Cooksville cowboy-announcer Chip Ridgely's head.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | November 27, 1991
A civic association leader is angry because the Crofton police chiefdid not publicly endorse a plan that requires county police be the first to respond to emergency calls in the community.Crofton Police Chief Deborah Bogush, when questioned by a resident Monday night, said the plan had left her officers demoralized. She also said her department was informed of the changes just a day before the plan was made public at a news conference."We've always responded to all calls and follow-up investigations," Bogush said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 13, 2009
Jack Howard Jacobs, a retired mechanical engineer and World War II airman who was shot down over Austria and later became a prisoner of war, died of kidney failure Oct. 3 at his son's Severna Park home. He was 85. Born in Baltimore, the son of a shoemaker and a homemaker, Mr. Jacobs was raised on Pinkney Road. He was a 1942 graduate of Forest Park High School and was studying engineering at the University of Maryland when he enlisted in the Air Force in 1943. After being trained as an aerial gunner and navigator, he was commissioned a second lieutenant and sent to Italy, where he joined the 15th Air Force.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2010
The man found dead in a trash chute of a downtown apartment building has been identified by city police as a 30-year-old resident of the building. Harsh Kumar, who police say lived on the 16 t h floor of the Park Charles building in the 200 block of N. Charles St., was found Aug. 12 in the parking-level trash compactor after an apparent fall from one of the building's top floors. Police say an autopsy has not shown any obvious signs of foul play or any injuries other than those consistent with a fall, but the investigation is continuing.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2010
An autopsy suggests that a man found dead in a downtown apartment building trash chute might have fallen into it, according to police. The man, who has not been identified, had injuries "consistent with a bad fall," said Anthony Guglielmi, the Police Department's chief spokesman. The state medical examiner and homicide detectives continue to probe the death, which occurred at the Park Charles apartment building in the 200 block of N. Charles St., he said. "It would be very difficult for someone to have put a body in the trash compactor without more signs [of a struggle]
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
City homicide detectives were investigating the discovery of a body that appeared to have gone down the trash chute of a downtown apartment building. An unidentified man's body was discovered in a trash compactor in the 200 block of N. Charles St. at about 10:15 a.m. Thursday by building employees, said Anthony Guglielmi, the police department's chief spokesman. Guglielmi said a preliminary review showed no obvious signs of foul play or trauma, but detectives were awaiting the results of an autopsy by the state medical examiner's office.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 13, 2009
Jack Howard Jacobs, a retired mechanical engineer and World War II airman who was shot down over Austria and later became a prisoner of war, died of kidney failure Oct. 3 at his son's Severna Park home. He was 85. Born in Baltimore, the son of a shoemaker and a homemaker, Mr. Jacobs was raised on Pinkney Road. He was a 1942 graduate of Forest Park High School and was studying engineering at the University of Maryland when he enlisted in the Air Force in 1943. After being trained as an aerial gunner and navigator, he was commissioned a second lieutenant and sent to Italy, where he joined the 15th Air Force.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | October 14, 2007
Ladies and gentlemen, we have a business rarity, a specimen seldom identified outside the imaginations of certain management professors: The Perfect Merger. Textron's planned buyout of Hunt Valley's AAI Corp. and its United Industrial Corp. umbrella is good for shareholders, employees, customers and vendors at both companies. Maybe most important, it's not too good for United Industrial's executives. Textron, maker of Bell helicopters and Cessna planes, is buying United Industrial and its Maryland business of small, pilotless spy planes for $1.1 billion.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | February 19, 2006
Feb. 6 must have been really busy for top bosses at Duratek, the Columbia radioactive-waste disposal company. They signed new "golden parachute" deals that would pay them big money just in case Duratek got sold to another company and they lost their jobs. Then their board agreed to sell Duratek to another company - EnergySolutions of Salt Lake City - although Duratek's biggest shareholder turned out to hate the deal. Potential ... and fruition. Wishes ... and fulfillment. All by the close of business Feb. 6. The heck with magic carpets; Aladdin has a better ride that floats through the sky. Golden parachutes have been described as job insurance for top executives.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF Bloomberg News contributed to this article | September 10, 1998
A day after exploding for a record gain, the stock market slumped yesterday as investors took profits and several large, high-quality companies reported that they expect weaker third-quarter earnings.The market was also buffeted by growing concerns over the Clinton presidency, analysts said.The Dow Jones industrial average sank 155.76 points, or 1.94 percent, to 7,865.02 after Tuesday's record 380.53-point rise, which was spurred by Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan's hint Friday that interest rates could be cut.The sharp rise in the market, however, gave way to worries that the problems dogging Clinton could damage the U.S. economy and erode investors' already shaken confidence in the stock market.
NEWS
September 21, 1992
A newborn boy was rescued from the trash chute of an East Baltimore public housing high-rise apartment building last night by police officers and firefighters after a tenant heard the infant's cries.Southeastern District officers and several firefighters used shovels, metal rods and their hands to tear apart the clogged trash chute between the first and second floors of the Two Hundred Aisquith building until one of them reached the crying baby and gently pulled him out, police said.With his umbilical cord still attached, the baby was rushed by ambulance to the pediatric intensive care unit at Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he was treated for a minor cut to the head and listed in good condition.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | December 19, 2005
LAKE PLACID, N.Y. --Famous Ice Age mammals: woolly mammoth, mastodon, saber-toothed tiger, Anne Abernathy. While the other three are extinct, Abernathy is on her way to a sixth consecutive Winter Olympics. At 52, she'll break the record she set in 2002 as the oldest female competitor at the cold-weather Games. "Grandma Luge" - a nickname she picked up when she was a mere 40 - will put on the colors of her native U.S. Virgin Islands one more time because she has a message to send to everyone of her generation.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 2, 2002
WASHINGTON - Future escapees from high-rise disasters might find themselves hurtling to safety down giant, inflated chutes if a well-connected Israeli company makes good on its invention. The Advanced Modular Evacuation System, which looks like a giant elephant trunk hanging down from a building, is intended to rescue people who are stuck above the reach of a hook-and-ladder. According to its manufacturer, upgrades of the device someday could rescue people from 100 floors above the street.
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