Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChurch Hospital
IN THE NEWS

Church Hospital

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | November 22, 1994
Dr. Arun B. Sapre, chief of neurosurgery and vice chief of the medical staff at Church Hospital, died Nov. 13 of a heart attack at his Hunt Valley residence.He was 57.He had been on the staff of Church Hospital since 1971 and was appointed chief of neurosurgery in 1974.He had been chief of neurosurgery at North Charles General Hospital from 1973 to 1981.He had been associated with the Johns Hopkins Hospital and the Greater Baltimore, Mercy and St. Joseph medical centers, and had been assistant professor of neurosurgery at the Johns Hopkins University since 1992.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | January 8, 2006
A photo caption in Sunday's editions of The Sun misidentified the Rev. Wease Day. The Sun regrets the errors. SAGO, W.Va. -- When it happened, before dawn Monday morning, the Rev. Wease Day thought it would be a good idea to open his church to the rescue workers, to give them a warm place to get coffee and doughnuts while they searched for the 13 miners trapped under the mountain across the river. Two were his friends. As a boy, he had played football and gone hunting and fishing with George Hamner Jr. And for more than 20 years, Fred Ware Jr. had lived next door to the church and kept an eye on things for Day, who does double duty as a school bus driver.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2000
Some came to the place where Edgar Allan Poe died to snatch up the bargains. Some came as much to buy as to conjure, one final time, deeply held memories. Some came just to walk the halls. Few were disappointed. The occasion was the liquidation sale at Church Hospital, a buyer-beware free-for-all where just about every item in the venerable, 142-year-old institution was tagged, wheeled into the open and put up for sale. The event, which started yesterday and will continue daily until May 22, was yet another death-march moment for the historic hospital.
NEWS
April 18, 2005
Joyce T. O'Shea, a vice president at the former Church Hospital, died Tuesday of a bacterial infection at Keswick Multi-Care Center. She was 74. Born Joyce Tucker in Concord, N.C., she graduated from Queens College in Charlotte, N.C., in 1953. After receiving a bachelor's degree in nursing from the Johns Hopkins University in 1958, she and a friend decided they wanted to live in Florida and began driving south. "They only made it as far as Duke before their money ran out," said her husband, James F. O'Shea.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1999
MedStar Health said yesterday that it is considering options for Church Hospital in East Baltimore, including closing it, selling it or consolidating services.The hospital reported $3.4 million in operating losses for the 12 months that ended March 30. Licensed for 144 beds, it had 64 patients on an average day last year -- so few as to make efficient operation difficult.The Church campus also includes 115 assisted-living beds, with an occupancy of 92 percent of capacity, and a 121-bed skilled nursing center, which is 98 percent filled.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1999
MedStar Health has accepted Johns Hopkins Health System's offer to buy the nearby campus of Church Hospital for an undisclosed sum, the two health systems confirmed yesterday.The deal is scheduled to close 30 days after a due diligence period, during which Hopkins will evaluate any environmental or other risks associated with the property, said Gary Stephenson, a Hopkins spokesman.Church occupies two city blocks just south of Hopkins on Broadway in East Baltimore.Hopkins started using the campus' parking garage and parking lots this week.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1999
Johns Hopkins has made "a business-like offer" for the nearby campus of Church Hospital as a site for future expansion, Ronald R. Peterson, president of the Johns Hopkins Health System, said yesterday.MedStar Health, which owns Church, is reviewing the Hopkins offer but "won't rule out going out with a request for other proposals," said John Marzano, a MedStar spokesman.Church occupies two city blocks just south of Hopkins on Broadway in East Baltimore. MedStar announced Wednesday that it will close the hospital this fall, and a nursing home and assisted living facility by June.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,Sun Staff | October 31, 1999
As if Edgar Allan Poe's much-debated demise was not cause enough for speculation, now comes another uncertainty: What will happen to the place where he died?The author and poet, Baltimore's favorite grim son, died before daylight 150 years ago in what was Washington College Hospital and is now Church Hospital. The problem today is that Church Hospital is closing shortly, and the prognosis for saving the venerable brick building is not good.Nearby Johns Hopkins has made an offer to buy Church and its two city blocks on North Broadway, but Hopkins Health System President Ronald R. Peterson said interest in the property is "longer-term land use."
FEATURES
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1999
Church Home and Church Hospital are closing, and Agnes Slezak can't decide what to bake.She's 73, and she wants to bring a little something to the gals who have taken such good care of her husband. He's 77. They've been coming to the hospital since the 1980s, and in the last few years, as often as twice a week.Agnes brought a million-dollar pound cake once. Another time, it was a pear delight, and everyone wanted the recipe, even the doctors. But this time is different; this visit will be the last.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1999
Church Hospital -- Baltimore's second-oldest and the building where Edgar Allan Poe died and Union soldiers wounded on Pratt Street in the beginning of the Civil War were treated -- will close its doors this fall.In the shadow of its world-class neighbor, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Church served the East Baltimore community, particularly the elderly, for 142 years, earning a reputation for caring and homeyness. Over time, however, families that traditionally turned to it began moving to the suburbs, leaving it with empty beds and lower income.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2004
A statement by Pope John Paul II that health care providers are morally obliged to provide food and water to patients in persistent vegetative states has left church officials uncertain what impact it would have at the nation's more than 600 Catholic hospitals. The statement, made March 20 but translated into English on Thursday, raised major questions in the church's decades-long debate over how far health care providers should go to keep alive people who have been in deep comas for long periods.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2002
Mayor Martin O'Malley and several other elected officials held a groundbreaking ceremony yesterday for a 166-unit affordable and mixed-income housing project on Broadway just south of Johns Hopkins Hospital. Broadway Overlook, which will be funded in part by a $21 million federal grant, will be built next to the former Church Hospital and replace the high-rise Broadway Homes complex that were demolished two years ago. Developer Judy Seigel and partners plan to build a community of brick rowhouses, with trees and lawns in front.
NEWS
December 7, 2000
Barbara P. Kean, 85, homemaker, volunteer Barbara P. Kean, a homemaker and longtime volunteer at Church Hospital, died Monday of cancer at her home in the Hunting Ridge section of Baltimore. She was 85. Mrs. Kean, who never learned to drive a car, rode buses across the city to Church Hospital in East Baltimore, where she volunteered for more than 20 years until she was in her 80s and suffered a broken ankle. She also visited the sick in her neighborhood and helped people who had personal problems.
NEWS
October 18, 2000
Rebecca Dobbin Fisher, a church and hospital volunteer, died Oct. 11 of respiratory failure at Blakehurst Life Care Community in Towson. She was 88. Mrs. Fisher, who was known as Dobby, managed the Christmas bazaar at St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Garrison for many years. She was chairwoman of the gift shop at Greater Baltimore Medical Center and regularly visited fairs in New York and Washington to collect inventory for the store. She also was on the hospital's board. A graduate of the Calvert School and Roland Park Country School, she married John A. B. Fisher, an engineer and president of the American Totalizator Co., in 1933.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2000
After 12 meetings and roughly 60 hours of negotiations, the city signed an agreement yesterday to swap two pieces of East Baltimore property to create an affordable townhouse neighborhood on the former site of Church Hospital. Residents of the adjacent Washington Hill community initially opposed the move but endorsed the request by city housing officials yesterday that will allow Johns Hopkins Hospital to take over the former Broadway Homes site in return for the Church Hospital site. Hopkins intends to build offices, laboratories and a parking complex at Broadway and Fayette Street, on the former site of a tower and low-income apartments demolished last month.
NEWS
By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2000
A city-backed scheme to tear down the now defunct Church Hospital and replace it with a low-income and market rate housing development, thought to be nearly a done deal in January, has become bogged down in a community planning process so tense that a federal arbitrator has been called. At issue is a proposed swap of two roughly nine-acre parcels of land near Johns Hopkins Hospital. One is the city-owned site of the dilapidated 429-unit Broadway Homes housing project, directly across the street from Hopkins.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1995
Karen Hiebler had been working at a Mars supermarket on Holabird Avenue for 10 years when the company asked her to take a random drug test last fall. No problem, she thought.Big problem, she found out. The test came back showing a urine sample chock-full of PCP, something the bakery manager insisted she'd never taken in her life. She was fired that day. But five months later, Ms. Hiebler says, she received the results she had expected: A different lab determined through DNA testing that the sample wasn't hers.
NEWS
April 12, 1998
June E. Fisher, secretary and activities coordinator at Church Hospital Adult Medical Day Care, died of cancer Monday at Church Hospital. She was 66.A lifelong resident of Highlandtown, Mrs. Fisher taught at St. Elizabeth's Business School from the early 1970s until it closed in 1986, when she joined the staff of Church Hospital.The former June Mercer was a 1949 graduate of Patterson High School.She enjoyed a nearly 40-year association with Club 11, a small group of friends who played cards biweekly.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2000
Dr. Sylvan D. Goldberg, a Baltimore physician who mentored young doctors as chief of medicine and residency at Church Hospital, died Friday at his Northwest Baltimore home of heart disease. He was 84. A native of Baltimore, he graduated from Forest Park High School and the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. In 1939, he earned a medical degree from the University of Maryland School of Medicine. After completing his residency in 1944 at Church Home and Hospital, Dr. Goldberg served as a captain in the Army Medical Corps in England, France and Germany during World War II. After returning to Baltimore, he opened a private practice in internal medicine at the Medical Arts Building at Cathedral and Read streets in Mount Vernon.
NEWS
By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2000
Some came to the place where Edgar Allan Poe died to snatch up the bargains. Some came as much to buy as to conjure, one final time, deeply held memories. Some came just to walk the halls. Few were disappointed. The occasion was the liquidation sale at Church Hospital, a buyer-beware free-for-all where just about every item in the venerable, 142-year-old institution was tagged, wheeled into the open and put up for sale. The event, which started yesterday and will continue daily until May 22, was yet another death-march moment for the historic hospital.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.