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NEWS
December 18, 2002
Lloyd O. Shirley, who maintained a practice as a certified public accountant for half a century, died of a stroke Monday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Timonium resident was 78. Mr. Shirley was born and raised in Schenectady, N.Y., and earned a bachelor's degree in business administration from Lehigh University in 1948. He moved to Baltimore after becoming a CPA, and two years later established Lloyd O. Shirley CPA, which for many years has been located on Allegheny Avenue in Towson.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
An upstairs room at Asbury Methodist Church is stuffed with memorabilia and documents of the Annapolis church, from faded photos of generations of church leaders to mugs commemorating the recent 200th anniversary. The filing cabinets that line a back wall in this informal exhibit space contain a trove of church records - births, deaths and marriages among them. The glass cabinets elsewhere in the room hold other items, including a tea kettle that a century ago sat on a wood-fired stove in the church, used to boil water for tea for the pastor and his visitors.
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NEWS
January 30, 2012
The ultimatum by the Obama Administration's Department of Health and Human Services to Christian church groups (and by implication Christian medical personal) to abandon their faith exposes further its increasingly totalitarian pagan character ("Fight over birth control," Jan. 26). This state-against-the-church conflict increasingly resembles aspects of German church history of the 1930s. Until 1934, most German churches supported Chancellor Adolf Hitler'spromise to restore Germany'seconomy and honor.
NEWS
January 30, 2012
The ultimatum by the Obama Administration's Department of Health and Human Services to Christian church groups (and by implication Christian medical personal) to abandon their faith exposes further its increasingly totalitarian pagan character ("Fight over birth control," Jan. 26). This state-against-the-church conflict increasingly resembles aspects of German church history of the 1930s. Until 1934, most German churches supported Chancellor Adolf Hitler'spromise to restore Germany'seconomy and honor.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff writer | October 9, 1991
Parishioners at St. John's Roman Catholic Church are lifting the veil of time."I think we're all trying to get back to basics," said Martha Kirkpatrick, a student in St. John's classes tracing Catholicism from its creation to the present."
NEWS
November 27, 2003
St. Ann's speaker to address issue of gay bishop The Rev. Donald Armentrout will speak at 4 p.m. Dec. 6 at St. Ann's Church Parish Hall, 199 Duke of Gloucester St. in Annapolis. Armentrout's topic will be "What is Happening in the Episcopal Church Today - Context and Content." The talk ties in with the recent election of Bishop V. Gene Robinson as bishop coadjutor of the Episcopal Diocese of New Hampshire. Robinson is the first openly gay man to be elected as a bishop in the Episcopal Church.
NEWS
By FRANK P. L. SOMERVILLE | October 13, 1995
Christians and Jews through the centuries have been perplexed, troubled and inspired by the terrifying biblicalaccount of God commanding Abraham to sacrifice his beloved son, Isaac.In a free evening program Thursday, sponsored by the Institute for Christian and Jewish Studies and Baltimore Hebrew University, three scholars will consider "The Binding of Isaac" from various faith traditions.Robin Jensen, a Presbyterian who is assistant professor of church history at Andover Newton Theological School in Newton Centre, Mass.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter Community correspondent | November 12, 1991
"We have had a rich history," Pastor Frank Bondurant said Saturday, during a special service commemorating the Linthicum Seventh-day Adventist Church's 25th anniversary, "and with God's grace, (we will have) a rich future."During the service, parishioner Rae Mackey read the church history, recalling the major events and milestones since its beginning in 1966, when 59 people gathered at Andover High School.Later, they would begin meeting at St. John's Lutheran Church. Aftereight years, they built and moved into their present A-frame building on Andover Road.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | August 9, 1994
THESE ARE tough times for many inner-city churches, particularly the 16 Catholic churches targeted for reorganization or closure by the Archdiocese of Baltimore.Shrinking congregations leave many unable to afford to maintain their buildings, some of which are more than a century old.However, at least one venerable city Catholic church stands out as an example to others that it is possible to go through troubled times and survive. That church is the 103-year-old Corpus Christi, located on West Lafayette Avenue in Bolton Hill.
FEATURES
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | January 2, 2006
From the death of the third-longest-serving pope in church history to the post-Katrina outpouring of faith-based charity, from the Israeli withdrawal from Gaza to sectarian violence in Iraq, from the debate over teaching intelligent design in public schools to the battle over the fate of a brain-damaged woman in a Florida nursing home, religion again claimed a leading role in U.S. and world affairs in 2005. Journalists who cover faith and values for the mainstream press chose the death of Pope John Paul II as the top religion story of the year, and a majority agreed the late pontiff was the religion newsmaker of the year.
FEATURES
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | January 2, 2006
From the death of the third-longest-serving pope in church history to the post-Katrina outpouring of faith-based charity, from the Israeli withdrawal from Gaza to sectarian violence in Iraq, from the debate over teaching intelligent design in public schools to the battle over the fate of a brain-damaged woman in a Florida nursing home, religion again claimed a leading role in U.S. and world affairs in 2005. Journalists who cover faith and values for the mainstream press chose the death of Pope John Paul II as the top religion story of the year, and a majority agreed the late pontiff was the religion newsmaker of the year.
NEWS
November 27, 2003
St. Ann's speaker to address issue of gay bishop The Rev. Donald Armentrout will speak at 4 p.m. Dec. 6 at St. Ann's Church Parish Hall, 199 Duke of Gloucester St. in Annapolis. Armentrout's topic will be "What is Happening in the Episcopal Church Today - Context and Content." The talk ties in with the recent election of Bishop V. Gene Robinson as bishop coadjutor of the Episcopal Diocese of New Hampshire. Robinson is the first openly gay man to be elected as a bishop in the Episcopal Church.
NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 24, 2003
When you worship at a 119-year-old church that has a reputation for being warm and welcoming, reaches out to communities in need and celebrates its membership with an annual homecoming, you tend to stick around. Take Dorothy "Dottie" Moore. At 68, Moore is lifetime member of Hopkins United Methodist Church (UMC) in Highland. "I was born into the church," she says. Moore's parents were members. So were her grandparents. Her two daughters grew up in the church and the younger, Judith Murray, is a lay leader.
NEWS
December 18, 2002
Lloyd O. Shirley, who maintained a practice as a certified public accountant for half a century, died of a stroke Monday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Timonium resident was 78. Mr. Shirley was born and raised in Schenectady, N.Y., and earned a bachelor's degree in business administration from Lehigh University in 1948. He moved to Baltimore after becoming a CPA, and two years later established Lloyd O. Shirley CPA, which for many years has been located on Allegheny Avenue in Towson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff | January 7, 2001
It was a riveting sight. An old man, back bent by the weight of years, shuffling toward the ancient wall of stone blocks. With a trembling hand, he slipped a card into a crevice. He stepped back for a long moment, absorbed in prayer -- entirely alone, except for the world that was watching. Pope John Paul II's simple gesture at Jerusalem's Western Wall last March signified how far his Roman Catholic Church has come in its efforts to achieve reconciliation with Judaism. Those efforts have not stilled the voices of moral outrage.
NEWS
By Nicoline Smits and Nicoline Smits,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 2000
The historical marker in front of St. John's Episcopal Church in Ellicott City tells us that the church was established in 1728 as a "Chapel of Ease" for Queen Caroline Parish, so Episcopalians from outlying areas would not have to travel too far to attend services. The church building, according to the marker, was built in 1860 on land donated by Caleb and Elizabeth Dorsey. When people think of churches in connection with history, they usually consider an earlier time. However, St. John's is also part of a much more recent period in history, the Vietnam War. On the church grounds, in front of the parish building, an American flag continuously flies.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
An upstairs room at Asbury Methodist Church is stuffed with memorabilia and documents of the Annapolis church, from faded photos of generations of church leaders to mugs commemorating the recent 200th anniversary. The filing cabinets that line a back wall in this informal exhibit space contain a trove of church records - births, deaths and marriages among them. The glass cabinets elsewhere in the room hold other items, including a tea kettle that a century ago sat on a wood-fired stove in the church, used to boil water for tea for the pastor and his visitors.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | June 29, 1992
The scene at Poppleton and Hollins streets in Southwest Baltimore could have been lifted from a 19th century church photograph.There were black-caped Knights of Columbus, nuns in billowing white habits, altar boys in red cassocks and an archbishop with a miter and crozier.Every pew overflowed for the 150th anniversary of St. Peter the Apostle Church, a graceful and pleasant Greek Revival building that is home to one of the city's oldest Roman Catholic parishes.Archbishop William H. Keeler lauded the congregation for its "generosity of heart" during a Mass filled with Latin hymns, ringing tower bells, waving hand fans and references to the permanence and unbroken ties found in one of Baltimore's classic neighborhoods.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 7, 2000
SAN ANTONIO - Someone is stealing pieces of this city's past, and whatever the motives, the thefts have stunned local church officials, stumped police, and saddened heritage-conscious people. Between midnight and dawn Tuesday, thieves broke into the 300-year-old San Juan Capistrano Mission near here and stole three hand-carved 18th-century statues from the church's altar, including one dating to 1731 that depicts the mission's namesake, Giovanni de Capistrano. "This is somebody who knew exactly what they were doing," said the Rev. James Galvin, the mission's pastor.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2000
In what was once an Assembly of God church in Savage, a haze of aromatic burnt myrrh fills the sanctuary as a group of Coptic Orthodox Christians honors rituals that essentially haven't changed since the fourth century. Many people are unfamiliar with the ancient religion practiced in St. Mary Coptic Orthodox Church in Howard County. In the quiet, historic community, the church houses such cultural touchstones as an altar from Egypt and ostrich eggs that represent God's faithfulness. Members say the church helps them preserve their heritage.
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