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By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Sun Staff Writer | March 27, 1994
Glenn Donithan hadn't been to church since he was 10.He had long since dropped the Presbyterianism of his youth and drifted into a vague agnosticism. At a time when he was depressed over marital problems, Mr. Donithan was invited by a friend to Grace Fellowship, a 2,000-member church in Timonium."
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By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2002
Their 96-year-old church in Roland Park needed an overhaul, which meant the 600- strong congregation of St. David's Episcopal Church needed somewhere else to go. A mile down the road in Hampden stood St. Mary's Church, bereft of its Episcopal worshippers since Christmas Eve 1999. Yesterday morning, the churchgoers - marking the end of a half-year in the best temporary quarters they could hope for - said goodbye to the Hampden chapel and marched the mile north, eager for the first glimpse of their restored sanctuary.
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By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Staff Writer | February 27, 1992
Jewish Peace Lobby sends letter to national candidatesAn hour before the Democratic presidential candidates are scheduled to debate Sunday at the University of Maryland College Park, the Jewish Peace Lobby will urge them to continue current Mideast peace efforts.The group will release an open letter that asked the candidates to pledge themselves to two actions: proceeding with President Bush's peace initiatives and pursuing a halt to new Israeli settlement of the West Bank and Gaza territories as vigorously as the Bush administration is doing.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2001
Calvary Lutheran Church in Woodbine is overflowing with worshippers - it holds Sunday school in walkways, has crowded parking lots and considered holding meetings at nearby restaurants. Its membership has doubled to 260 within the past 16 years, causing the church to extend its single service to three, expand from one to two pastors and add a full staff. "The goal of the Christian church is to take the Gospel to other people," the Rev. Roger L. Rinker said. "The problem is that when they come in, everything changes - you can't sit where you want to sit, you can't park where you want to park."
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2002
Their 96-year-old church in Roland Park needed an overhaul, which meant the 600- strong congregation of St. David's Episcopal Church needed somewhere else to go. A mile down the road in Hampden stood St. Mary's Church, bereft of its Episcopal worshippers since Christmas Eve 1999. Yesterday morning, the churchgoers - marking the end of a half-year in the best temporary quarters they could hope for - said goodbye to the Hampden chapel and marched the mile north, eager for the first glimpse of their restored sanctuary.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2001
Calvary Lutheran Church in Woodbine is overflowing with worshippers -- it holds Sunday school in walkways, has crowded parking lots and considered holding meetings at nearby restaurants. Its membership has doubled to 260 within the past 16 years, causing the church to increase the number of Sunday services from one to three, expand from one to two pastors and add a full staff. "The goal of the Christian church is to take the Gospel to other people," the Rev. Roger L. Rinker said. "The problem is that when they come in, everything changes -- you can't sit where you want to sit, you can't park where you want to park."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | May 17, 1994
Well into its second century, the building shows its age, but the spirit of St. Paul's United Methodist Church has lost none of its vitality.The congregation of the church, a fixture on Sykesville's Main Street since 1889, is still growing and plans a $600,000 expansion and restoration.The facade, replicated in wooden miniature churches the congregation is selling for $12.50 as part of its fund-raising efforts, will not change. The interior of the church will undergo extensive renovations.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2001
Calvary Lutheran Church in Woodbine is overflowing with worshippers - it holds Sunday school in walkways, has crowded parking lots and considered holding meetings at nearby restaurants. Its membership has doubled to 260 within the past 16 years, causing the church to extend its single service to three, expand from one to two pastors and add a full staff. "The goal of the Christian church is to take the Gospel to other people," the Rev. Roger L. Rinker said. "The problem is that when they come in, everything changes - you can't sit where you want to sit, you can't park where you want to park."
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2001
Calvary Lutheran Church in Woodbine is overflowing with worshippers - it holds Sunday school in walkways, has crowded parking lots and considered holding meetings at nearby restaurants. Its membership has doubled to 260 within the past 16 years, forcing the church to extend its single service to three, expand from one to two pastors and add a full staff. "The goal of the Christian church is to take the Gospel to other people," the Rev. Roger L. Rinker said. "The problem is that when they come in, everything changes - you can't sit where you want to sit, you can't park where you want to park."
NEWS
By JAMES BOCK and JAMES BOCK,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1995
Memo to Pope John Paul II re Baltimore faithful: Your flock is largely white, middle-class, suburban and steadily growing; likes the church but often skips Mass; joins lay ministries but not the priesthood; favors your leadership but not your policies.When the pope prays at Camden Yards a week from today, he will be in the heart of the Archdiocese of Baltimore, 466,618 members of 154 parishes in Baltimore and nine Maryland counties west of the Chesapeake Bay. They are a sliver of America's 56 million Roman Catholics, the nation's largest denomination, and a speck among the world's 1 billion faithful.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2001
Calvary Lutheran Church in Woodbine is overflowing with worshippers -- it holds Sunday school in walkways, has crowded parking lots and considered holding meetings at nearby restaurants. Its membership has doubled to 260 within the past 16 years, causing the church to increase the number of Sunday services from one to three, expand from one to two pastors and add a full staff. "The goal of the Christian church is to take the Gospel to other people," the Rev. Roger L. Rinker said. "The problem is that when they come in, everything changes -- you can't sit where you want to sit, you can't park where you want to park."
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2001
Calvary Lutheran Church in Woodbine is overflowing with worshippers - it holds Sunday school in walkways, has crowded parking lots and considered holding meetings at nearby restaurants. Its membership has doubled to 260 within the past 16 years, forcing the church to extend its single service to three, expand from one to two pastors and add a full staff. "The goal of the Christian church is to take the Gospel to other people," the Rev. Roger L. Rinker said. "The problem is that when they come in, everything changes - you can't sit where you want to sit, you can't park where you want to park."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 13, 1996
AMERICAN FORK, Utah -- On a bluff here above Utah Lake, with the snow-dusted Wasatch Mountains for a backdrop, the Mormon Church has raised a building whose pale granite surface reflects the dazzling Rocky Mountain sunlight. A gilt inscription atop one wall identifies it as "the House of the Lord."It is a temple, the latest in a remarkable era of worldwide construction of such sacred spaces by the church. The inscribed words are meant literally, signifying a place designed so that God would feel at home within.
NEWS
By JAMES BOCK and JAMES BOCK,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1995
Memo to Pope John Paul II re Baltimore faithful: Your flock is largely white, middle-class, suburban and steadily growing; likes the church but often skips Mass; joins lay ministries but not the priesthood; favors your leadership but not your policies.When the pope prays at Camden Yards a week from today, he will be in the heart of the Archdiocese of Baltimore, 466,618 members of 154 parishes in Baltimore and nine Maryland counties west of the Chesapeake Bay. They are a sliver of America's 56 million Roman Catholics, the nation's largest denomination, and a speck among the world's 1 billion faithful.
NEWS
By JAMES BOCK and JAMES BOCK,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
Memo to Pope John Paul II re Baltimore faithful: Your flock is largely white, middle-class, suburban and steadily growing; likes the church but often skips Mass; joins lay ministries but not the priesthood; favors your leadership but not your policies.When the pope prays at Camden Yards a week from today, he will be in the heart of the Archdiocese of Baltimore, 466,618 members of 154 parishes in Baltimore and nine Maryland counties west of the Chesapeake Bay. They are a sliver of America's 56 million Roman Catholics, the nation's largest denomination, and a speck among the world's 1 billion faithful.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | May 17, 1994
Well into its second century, the building shows its age, but the spirit of St. Paul's United Methodist Church has lost none of its vitality.The congregation of the church, a fixture on Sykesville's Main Street since 1889, is still growing and plans a $600,000 expansion and restoration.The facade, replicated in wooden miniature churches the congregation is selling for $12.50 as part of its fund-raising efforts, will not change. The interior of the church will undergo extensive renovations.
NEWS
By JAMES BOCK and JAMES BOCK,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
Memo to Pope John Paul II re Baltimore faithful: Your flock is largely white, middle-class, suburban and steadily growing; likes the church but often skips Mass; joins lay ministries but not the priesthood; favors your leadership but not your policies.When the pope prays at Camden Yards a week from today, he will be in the heart of the Archdiocese of Baltimore, 466,618 members of 154 parishes in Baltimore and nine Maryland counties west of the Chesapeake Bay. They are a sliver of America's 56 million Roman Catholics, the nation's largest denomination, and a speck among the world's 1 billion faithful.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | October 12, 1992
Because of the dramatic growth of a large congregation that (( replaced a sharply declining one, a distinctive architectural landmark in downtown Baltimore -- the Gothic Revival church at Franklin and Cathedral streets -- soon will be for sale for the second time.New Psalmist Baptist Church, which has worshiped in the 145-year-old Tudor-style building since 1978, plans to construct a much larger sanctuary complex on the nearly 20 acres it owns in Southwest Baltimore. The old Franklin Street building can accommodate about 1,000 worshipers.
FEATURES
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Sun Staff Writer | March 27, 1994
Glenn Donithan hadn't been to church since he was 10.He had long since dropped the Presbyterianism of his youth and drifted into a vague agnosticism. At a time when he was depressed over marital problems, Mr. Donithan was invited by a friend to Grace Fellowship, a 2,000-member church in Timonium."
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | October 12, 1992
Because of the dramatic growth of a large congregation that (( replaced a sharply declining one, a distinctive architectural landmark in downtown Baltimore -- the Gothic Revival church at Franklin and Cathedral streets -- soon will be for sale for the second time.New Psalmist Baptist Church, which has worshiped in the 145-year-old Tudor-style building since 1978, plans to construct a much larger sanctuary complex on the nearly 20 acres it owns in Southwest Baltimore. The old Franklin Street building can accommodate about 1,000 worshipers.
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