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By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2005
It's as decrepit as a piece of 1901 public art can get in the middle of a pristine state capital - a fountain designed as a horse trough just before the Automobile Age rode into town. "Not exactly presentable," Marie Dingle, a postal employee who sees it outside the window at her office, said in passing. "It should definitely get cleaned up." In an attempt to revivify the aged Southgate fountain on Church Circle in Annapolis, Mayor Ellen O. Moyer will propose restoration plans tomorrow in her state of the city address to the city council.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
Since 1901, Annapolis residents and downtown workers have been dropping off letters and buying stamps at the brick Georgian Revival-style post office on Church Circle. But not for much longer. A vote by the state's Board of Public Works on Wednesday seals the eventual fate of the post office. The state is buying the office for $3.2 million, with eventual plans to use the building for government offices. "The state saw an opportunity to retain the historic value of the building, particularly because it's in the footprint of other state-owned facilities.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2003
From historic Church Circle, the Anne Arundel County Courthouse looks like a little brick box with a big white cupola, a quaint 19th-century structure with a picturesque courtyard where couples are married in the shade of tall trees. It seems implausible that this building - smaller than some nearby houses - is home to Maryland's fifth-largest circuit court, visited by more than 4,000 people a week. But what's visible from the street is deceptive. Connected to the historic structure by a wave of glass is a behemoth hillside courthouse holding nearly 6 acres of floor space, a new high-tech facility with built-in electronics and modern security constructed to be unobtrusive and blend in with Annapolis' Historic District.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
Top state officials will decide Wednesday whether to buy the Annapolis post office on Church Circle to use it for government offices. The Board of Public Works -- comprised of the governor, comptroller and treasurer -- will vote on spending $3.2 million to buy the building. Appraisals for the building at 1 Church Circle range from a low of $950,000 to a high of $3.55 million, according to the state. The property is less than one acre and the building is 13,058 square feet.
NEWS
February 25, 1993
Realty company purchasedAnnapolis Church Circle Realty has been purchased by Timonium-based O'Conor, Piper & Flynn Realtors.The Annapolis real estate company earned $22 million in sales last year, and has been in business for 12 years. Its facilities will be merged with O'Conor, Piper & Flynn's own Church Circle offices in Annapolis.Margot's relocates to Clock Tower PlaceMargot's Finishing Touches has relocated from Annapolis Harbour Center to a 1,600 square-foot space in Clock Tower Place on Forest Drive in Annapolis.
NEWS
December 28, 2007
New Year's celebration -- Annapolis Alive! will host First Night Annapolis, a family-friendly, alcohol-free New Year's Eve celebration of the arts Monday. Free children's activities will take place from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Annapolis Recreation Center, 9 St. Mary's St. Rock at the Rec! presented by Battle of the Bands, will be held there from 7:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. Tickets cost $10 at the door. Live bands will perform all evening on two stages and along Main Street from Church Circle to Market Square with shopping and music on Maryland Avenue.
NEWS
December 4, 1997
Services for Donald H. Patterson Sr., retired publisher of the Baltimore Sun newspapers and president of the A. S. Abell Co., )) who died of cancer Tuesday, are planned for 1 p.m. Saturday at St. Anne Episcopal Church, Church Circle, Annapolis.Memorial donations may be made to the church; or Hospice of the Chesapeake, 8424 Veterans Highway, Millersville 21108.Pub Date: 12/04/97
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
Top state officials will decide Wednesday whether to buy the Annapolis post office on Church Circle to use it for government offices. The Board of Public Works -- comprised of the governor, comptroller and treasurer -- will vote on spending $3.2 million to buy the building. Appraisals for the building at 1 Church Circle range from a low of $950,000 to a high of $3.55 million, according to the state. The property is less than one acre and the building is 13,058 square feet.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | February 11, 1993
O'Conor, Piper & Flynn, the Baltimore region's biggest residential real estate company, got a little bigger yesterday with the acquisition of two small agencies -- one in Annapolis, the other in northern Baltimore County.O'Conor bought the brokerage division of 40-year-old Gaylord Brooks Realty, a 15-person firm in the Jacksonville section of Baltimore County, Chairman James P. O'Conor said. The land sale and development portion of Gaylord Brooks will remain with Richard A. Moore, a principal at Gaylord Brooks.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2002
The green-and-white banners on Annapolis' West Street proclaim, "It's happening." Property owners and business persons along the stretch of road from Church Circle to Westgate Circle hope the message, part of a $25,000 marketing campaign by the city, is more than just civic optimism. Supporters point to encouraging signs: the issuance of building permits for the Park Place development yesterday, the city's plans to begin the second phase of improvements to the road, and other developments in the works.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | May 18, 2008
Water is flowing again from the lions' mouths on the Southgate Memorial Fountain in Annapolis. Soot from decades of car exhaust has been cleaned from the English-style cross on the landmark honoring a 19th-century preacher who tried to help the underprivileged. A new recirculation system within the fountain will save a million gallons of water from draining directly into the city's storm sewers each year. Today, representatives of faith and government will gather around the restored limestone and granite fountain on Church Circle as they did in 1901, this time to rededicate it to Dr. William Scott Southgate and cement the fountain's place with other historic monuments in the state capital.
NEWS
December 28, 2007
New Year's celebration -- Annapolis Alive! will host First Night Annapolis, a family-friendly, alcohol-free New Year's Eve celebration of the arts Monday. Free children's activities will take place from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Annapolis Recreation Center, 9 St. Mary's St. Rock at the Rec! presented by Battle of the Bands, will be held there from 7:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. Tickets cost $10 at the door. Live bands will perform all evening on two stages and along Main Street from Church Circle to Market Square with shopping and music on Maryland Avenue.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2006
St. Anne's Cemetery has long held a fascination for Emily Peake. "I've always been nosy," she said. "I used to come out here with my mother" as a young girl, she said. For the past dozen years or so, Peake, 79, has been researching all three sections of the cemetery, the oldest in Annapolis, and learning about the scores of famous people buried there. John Shaw, the cabinetmaker; John and William Kielty, brothers who served in the Revolutionary War; Peter Hagner, appointed by President George Washington to serve as the third treasurer of the United States.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2005
It's as decrepit as a piece of 1901 public art can get in the middle of a pristine state capital - a fountain designed as a horse trough just before the Automobile Age rode into town. "Not exactly presentable," Marie Dingle, a postal employee who sees it outside the window at her office, said in passing. "It should definitely get cleaned up." In an attempt to revivify the aged Southgate fountain on Church Circle in Annapolis, Mayor Ellen O. Moyer will propose restoration plans tomorrow in her state of the city address to the city council.
NEWS
December 6, 2004
On December 3, 2004, EDWARD O. WAYSON, JR.; loving husband of Jeannine Wayson; devoted father of Sarah Elizabeth Wayson and Anne Katherine Wayson; step-father of Kacey Stephens; dear brother of Daniel Boone Wayson; beloved son of Ruthann Wayson. Family will receive friends on Monday from 4 to 7 P.M. at the JOHN M. TAYLOR FUNERAL HOME, INC. , 147 Duke of Gloucester Street, Annapolis. Funeral Services will be held Tuesday at 10:30 A.M. in St. Anne's Church, Church Circle, Annapolis. Burial will follow in Lakemont Memorial Gardens.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2004
Hours after cars and trucks began rumbling down historic West Street in Annapolis again yesterday, Alexandria Poole began hearing the refrain from customers at the 49 West coffee shop. "People were saying they missed having the street to themselves," said Poole, 22, a barista at the shop. "Now they're dodging cars and trucks." Annapolis officials gathered yesterday morning to celebrate the reopening of a one-block stretch of West Street after six months of construction, but afterward a funny thing happened.
NEWS
By Staff report | June 20, 1993
A dozen Annapolis business leaders braved the sweltering heat Friday afternoon to rally in front of the city's historic courthouse in support of a $43 million expansion project.Downtown merchants, lawyers, and representatives of the hotel and restaurant industry urged Annapolis' historic preservationists to approve the planned 250,000-square-foot Circuit Courthouse near Church Circle."Without the courthouse, it is easy to visualize either a ramshackle empty downtown or a tourist boardwalk," said Terry Drake, president of the Annapolis Business Coalition.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2002
The green and white banners on Annapolis' inner West Street proclaim, "It's happening." Property owners and business persons along the stretch of road from Church Circle to Westgate Circle hope the message, part of a $25,000 marketing campaign by the city, is more than just civic optimism. Supporters point to encouraging signs: the issuance of building permits for the Park Place development yesterday, the city's plans to begin the second phase of improvements to the road, and other development in the works.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2004
Matthew Latrick navigated the rickety floorboards of the clock tower at St. Anne's Episcopal Church in Annapolis, perching under dial windows to see the capital city from various vantage points. From the southeast window, Latrick peered down at Main Street leading to City Dock and the shimmering waters of the Chesapeake Bay. "It really gave you a great perspective of what a small town Annapolis is and how long ago the city was built - with the 1704 kind of feel," Latrick said later. Latrick, a college intern with the city, has spent the summer documenting the history of the town clock, which has provided the time for generations of Annapolitans.
NEWS
By Suzanne White and Suzanne White,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 16, 2004
After more than three centuries, St. Anne's Episcopal Church - a historic landmark in downtown Annapolis - remains home to worshipers of all faiths, tourists and to music lovers who enjoy the popular concerts held there. The church is at the center of Church Circle, a busy thoroughfare from which streets radiate like spokes of a wheel, leading the way to the State House, governor's mansion, antique shops and restaurants. "Clearly it was one of the premiere points of the city when it was planned," said the Rev. John Randolph Price.
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