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NEWS
By Staff report | March 7, 1991
Churches all over Annapolis will conduct a brief service at noon tomorrow to mark the end of war in the Persian Gulf.The churches will ring their bells, then conduct a 15-minute service to give thanks for the end of the war and pray for the safe return of the troops. Churches will remain open until 1 p.m. for people wanting to pray in silence.The observance was arranged by Emily Green, an aide to Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins. Green said people should to go to the nearest church or place of worship, regardless of faith, "to promote unity."
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NEWS
Jacques Kelly | April 5, 2013
A few weeks ago, I spent a few quiet minutes in Green Mount Cemetery, where its higher ground offers unexpected views of Baltimore. As I looked to the southeast, something curious caught my eye. What was going on in the nearby Oliver neighborhood? What was that thing attached to the mighty bell tower of St. Francis Xavier Roman Catholic Church? This parish — the oldest African-American Roman Catholic congregation in the United States officially founded for people of color — has just begun to celebrate its 150th anniversary.
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NEWS
December 24, 1996
FEW THINGS are as ubiquitous as noise -- from the din of television and radio in homes to roaring highway traffic to jarring workplace sounds. Noise can jolt, annoy and awaken. But not all noise is bothersome. Walk through Ellicott City's Main Street at high noon and the noise is bound to delight. The sound of bells from two churches and, recently, the Howard County Historical Society cascade from high towers down the hills to shower their dulcet tones.Smiles cross the faces of some tourists hearing the music for the first time.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
The stone marker in Catonsville Presbyterian Church's steeple tower is dated 1921, dedicated "to the Glory of God. " Next to it is a black ladder with caution signs tied to its rungs, warning of radio frequency fields in the narrow space above. In the steeple overlooking Frederick Road, three cell phone companies have placed antennas, serving a growing demand for smartphones, iPads and other gadgets. Such leasing arrangements help Catonsville Presbyterian and other Baltimore-area churches raise revenue, while companies get access to neighborhoods where it is difficult to build free-standing cell towers.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | June 29, 2003
A Memorable Place A warm visit to an ancestral home By Pat Kellermann SPECIAL TO THE SUN My daughters surprised me with a trip to Gsteig, Switzerland, last summer where my ancestors had owned the Steinbock Pension during the mid-1800s. The hotel is now named the Gasthaus Steinbock. This was my first trip to Gsteig, which is situated between beautiful lakes and mountains in the heart of the Jungfrau region. Gsteig has only two buildings, the Gasthaus Steinbock and a church. My great-grandparents (and later, my grandparents)
NEWS
January 23, 1995
In a letter to the editor published Monday, the Old Waverly History Exchange & Tea Room was named incorrectly.The Evening Sun regrets the error.Church bells are too much of a good thingSaint John's Episcopal Church at Huntingdon and its neighbors have co-existed harmoniously for decades. But the church broke with tradition a year ago when it instituted a bell schedule that awakens those living nearby at 6 a.m.With the new schedule, bells go off every 15 minutes, seven days of the week, at decibel levels determined to be unsafe by the American Speech and Language Association.
NEWS
By John Rivera and Laura Vozzella and John Rivera and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2001
As the noon Mass at the Basilica of the Assumption concluded yesterday, the carillon began to toll. The mournful peal of the bells is normally heard after a funeral. But it seemed appropriate, as many who felt they lost something gathered to pray. As the shock and horror of yesterday's terrorist attacks began to sink in, churches, synagogues and mosques opened their doors for formal services, shared petition and quiet meditation. Distraught, Roxanne Stephens, an office manager at a downtown law firm, heard the bells ringing at Old St. Paul's Episcopal Church.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
The stone marker in Catonsville Presbyterian Church's steeple tower is dated 1921, dedicated "to the Glory of God. " Next to it is a black ladder with caution signs tied to its rungs, warning of radio frequency fields in the narrow space above. In the steeple overlooking Frederick Road, three cell phone companies have placed antennas, serving a growing demand for smartphones, iPads and other gadgets. Such leasing arrangements help Catonsville Presbyterian and other Baltimore-area churches raise revenue, while companies get access to neighborhoods where it is difficult to build free-standing cell towers.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | April 5, 2013
A few weeks ago, I spent a few quiet minutes in Green Mount Cemetery, where its higher ground offers unexpected views of Baltimore. As I looked to the southeast, something curious caught my eye. What was going on in the nearby Oliver neighborhood? What was that thing attached to the mighty bell tower of St. Francis Xavier Roman Catholic Church? This parish — the oldest African-American Roman Catholic congregation in the United States officially founded for people of color — has just begun to celebrate its 150th anniversary.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | October 12, 1994
Gail Kreusinger has lived for 48 years on Montpelier Street -- close to picture-book St. John's-Huntingdon Episcopal Church, a Gothic Revival landmark rising from a secluded oasis of brick walks, flowers and tree-shaded boxwood along crime-battered Greenmount Avenue in Waverly.Ms. Kreusinger loves the bells of St. John's."They're beautiful, and they keep us on schedule." And she has the names of 50 others who agree with her.But for a small, determined group led by Dolores Moran, the mounting tensions around St. John's are worthy of Agatha Christie.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | June 29, 2003
A Memorable Place A warm visit to an ancestral home By Pat Kellermann SPECIAL TO THE SUN My daughters surprised me with a trip to Gsteig, Switzerland, last summer where my ancestors had owned the Steinbock Pension during the mid-1800s. The hotel is now named the Gasthaus Steinbock. This was my first trip to Gsteig, which is situated between beautiful lakes and mountains in the heart of the Jungfrau region. Gsteig has only two buildings, the Gasthaus Steinbock and a church. My great-grandparents (and later, my grandparents)
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2002
At 6,000 rotations per minute, the hand sander makes a terrifying noise -- the motor's deep growl coupled with the ear-piercing screech of its abrasive pad scraping metal -- that could curdle milk. But, headphones on, Ryan Parker hears only WHFS-FM. Behind bug-eye-like goggles that meet the top of his protective breathing mask, the 22-year-old's eyes fix on the fist-sized area of the huge bell he is buffing. His gloved hands gently but firmly press the equipment over the surface so slowly that in five minutes, he has put a shine on a section maybe 11 inches across and 6 inches high.
NEWS
By John Rivera and Laura Vozzella and John Rivera and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2001
As the noon Mass at the Basilica of the Assumption concluded yesterday, the carillon began to toll. The mournful peal of the bells is normally heard after a funeral. But it seemed appropriate, as many who felt they lost something gathered to pray. As the shock and horror of yesterday's terrorist attacks began to sink in, churches, synagogues and mosques opened their doors for formal services, shared petition and quiet meditation. Distraught, Roxanne Stephens, an office manager at a downtown law firm, heard the bells ringing at Old St. Paul's Episcopal Church.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nathan Dickinson and Nathan Dickinson,Columbia News Service | March 29, 1999
Many churchgoers at houses of worship across the country think they are hearing the soft ringing of old bells, when what they are really hearing is a computer. Yes, even the church bell is going digital."It has no moving parts but the exact same sound," said Paul Kozlak, a contract salesman for Schulmerich, a bell manufacturing company based in Sellersville, Pa., 40 miles northwest of Philadelphia.The digital bells "reproduce the sound of carillon bells exactly," Kozlak said.The Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York, the world's largest gothic cathedral, has used Schulmerich mechanical bells since the 1970s while its bell towers are under construction.
NEWS
December 24, 1996
FEW THINGS are as ubiquitous as noise -- from the din of television and radio in homes to roaring highway traffic to jarring workplace sounds. Noise can jolt, annoy and awaken. But not all noise is bothersome. Walk through Ellicott City's Main Street at high noon and the noise is bound to delight. The sound of bells from two churches and, recently, the Howard County Historical Society cascade from high towers down the hills to shower their dulcet tones.Smiles cross the faces of some tourists hearing the music for the first time.
NEWS
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 3, 1996
The church bells of Ellicott City, both real and electronic, are tolling in competition these days.The historic mill town's battle of the bells began early last month when the Howard County Historical Society started ringing once a day -- at noon -- the real bell atop its museum in the former First Presbyterian Church.Across the town's narrow valley, St. Paul's Catholic Church rings its bell -- also a real one -- three times a day, at 6 a.m., noon and 6 p.m.A stone's throw from the historical society, Emory United Methodist Church chimes in with its state-of-the-art system of bell-like electronic rods eight times a day and an audiotape of bells another five times a day -- for a total of 13 times a day from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.The cacophony has some nearby residents irritated and others becoming connoisseurs of the fine shades of bell ringing.
NEWS
By Peter S. Green and Peter S. Green,Special to The Sun | January 16, 1992
ZAGREB, Croatia -- Church bells across Croatia chimed at sundown yesterday to mark the European Community's recognition of its independence.After dark, revelers danced in the streets and fired automatic weaponsinto the air. Croatian flags decked the streets of Zagreb.But Croatia's problems are hardly over. The new country faces crippling economic problems, serious internal political opposition and an unfinished war with Serbia.Above all, recognition is seen as further insurance for Croatia that it can now call on other countries for help if war with the rest of Yugoslavia continues.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nathan Dickinson and Nathan Dickinson,Columbia News Service | March 29, 1999
Many churchgoers at houses of worship across the country think they are hearing the soft ringing of old bells, when what they are really hearing is a computer. Yes, even the church bell is going digital."It has no moving parts but the exact same sound," said Paul Kozlak, a contract salesman for Schulmerich, a bell manufacturing company based in Sellersville, Pa., 40 miles northwest of Philadelphia.The digital bells "reproduce the sound of carillon bells exactly," Kozlak said.The Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York, the world's largest gothic cathedral, has used Schulmerich mechanical bells since the 1970s while its bell towers are under construction.
NEWS
January 23, 1995
In a letter to the editor published Monday, the Old Waverly History Exchange & Tea Room was named incorrectly.The Evening Sun regrets the error.Church bells are too much of a good thingSaint John's Episcopal Church at Huntingdon and its neighbors have co-existed harmoniously for decades. But the church broke with tradition a year ago when it instituted a bell schedule that awakens those living nearby at 6 a.m.With the new schedule, bells go off every 15 minutes, seven days of the week, at decibel levels determined to be unsafe by the American Speech and Language Association.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | October 12, 1994
Gail Kreusinger has lived for 48 years on Montpelier Street -- close to picture-book St. John's-Huntingdon Episcopal Church, a Gothic Revival landmark rising from a secluded oasis of brick walks, flowers and tree-shaded boxwood along crime-battered Greenmount Avenue in Waverly.Ms. Kreusinger loves the bells of St. John's."They're beautiful, and they keep us on schedule." And she has the names of 50 others who agree with her.But for a small, determined group led by Dolores Moran, the mounting tensions around St. John's are worthy of Agatha Christie.
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