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NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 7, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In another overture to the middle class, President Clinton announced yesterday that his administration will cut $200 off closing costs for Americans who buy their first homes with mortgages backed by the Federal Housing Administration."
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NEWS
By Tim Rutten and Tim Rutten,Los Angeles Times | February 17, 2008
The Appeal By John Grisham Doubleday / 368 pages / $27.95 The Appeal is as angry, dark and urgent a piece of social realism as you're likely to find on the best-seller lists any time soon. Further, in this presidential election year, it's a far more blunt, accurate and plain-spoken indictment of our contemporary political system's real failings than you're likely to find anywhere on the nonfiction lists. Grisham has set himself an interesting task in The Appeal - to simultaneously explore the malevolent influence of moneyed special interests on our electoral system and to rehabilitate the social standing of trial lawyers.
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BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,SUN COLUMNIST | July 9, 2006
Federal factories in Philadelphia and Denver have already stamped out 4.8 billion little tan disks this year so that purses might be encumbered, cashiers oppressed and tradition preserved. No more. It's time to abolish the penny. The store of value and unit of account that inspired bards from Shakespeare to the Beastie Boys has stopped paying dividends. It stores little value - an eighth of a stick of gum is about right. It clogs the economy like mud in a machine. And now it costs more to make than it's worth.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,SUN COLUMNIST | July 9, 2006
Federal factories in Philadelphia and Denver have already stamped out 4.8 billion little tan disks this year so that purses might be encumbered, cashiers oppressed and tradition preserved. No more. It's time to abolish the penny. The store of value and unit of account that inspired bards from Shakespeare to the Beastie Boys has stopped paying dividends. It stores little value - an eighth of a stick of gum is about right. It clogs the economy like mud in a machine. And now it costs more to make than it's worth.
NEWS
By Myriam Marquez | March 17, 1993
REMEMBER when President Reagan brought in business mogul J. Peter Grace to find waste in the federal government?Nothing much ever came of the Grace Commission's hard work -- 2,478 proposals in all that would have saved about $424 billion over three years. Congress never quite embraced the concept that government has to run more like a business to protect the holdings of its investors -- the American people.Oh, but that was in 1984 -- before we shareholders (that's we, the people) wised up to the losses.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2002
The mother of 19-year-old Eric Stennett - the man acquitted last year of killing a Baltimore police officer in a high-speed chase, and called a "player" in the drug trade after another arrest last weekend - discovered suspected cocaine in her apartment and notified the police. The mother, Margaret Beatty, confirmed last night accounts from Police Department sources that she had called 911 yesterday morning to report finding suspected drugs in her apartment in the 1100 block of Park Ave. Officers who went to the apartment found a bag about the size of a lacrosse ball, filled with $5 vials of suspected cocaine, the sources said.
NEWS
By Douglas Lamborne and Douglas Lamborne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 17, 2000
OLDER GENERATIONS tend to look upon younger ones with a certain amount of despair: "Why, back in my day I had to walk five miles to school through 3 feet of snow." That sort of thing. Some grumble about the lack of voluntarism among baby boomers and those coming up behind them. Recent books, many of them seemingly written by Tom Brokaw, celebrate the sacrifices and service of seniors, extolling virtues that appear beyond the comprehension of younger people. One Old-timer draws comfort with word that about 65 kids have lined up at South River High School to give serious consideration to serving in the military.
NEWS
By Milton Bates | February 16, 1995
I SPOTTED my almost ancient, spherical chum, Fats Drobnak, lunching alone at Ikaros in Greektown the other day. Fats, my man, I greeted him. Mind if I join you? Why the bemused look?"Sootcherself. And what was the question again?"I was inquiring aboaut the source of the preoccupation evident in TC your countenance. Contemplating a few ponies on which you have placed win wagers lately only to see them falter at a critical time?"Naw. Ain't been to the track for a while. Clara's been givin' me grief about it. But, yeah, some things don't add up."
NEWS
By Tim Rutten and Tim Rutten,Los Angeles Times | February 17, 2008
The Appeal By John Grisham Doubleday / 368 pages / $27.95 The Appeal is as angry, dark and urgent a piece of social realism as you're likely to find on the best-seller lists any time soon. Further, in this presidential election year, it's a far more blunt, accurate and plain-spoken indictment of our contemporary political system's real failings than you're likely to find anywhere on the nonfiction lists. Grisham has set himself an interesting task in The Appeal - to simultaneously explore the malevolent influence of moneyed special interests on our electoral system and to rehabilitate the social standing of trial lawyers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Pekkanen and By Sarah Pekkanen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 17, 2000
Money. Is there anything else that inspires such a love-hate relationship in us? We never have enough of it. It's probably responsible for the breakup of more marriages than meddling mothers-in-law. But oh, what a great feeling when you reach into your pocket and find a forgotten $20 bill. Of course, we don't feel quite so passionately about our humble quarters, dimes, nickels and pennies. They're chump change - something to drop on the table along with the car keys at the end of the day, or stick in a glass jar to collect dust.
SPORTS
By JEFF BARKER and JEFF BARKER,SUN REPORTER | June 22, 2006
Major League Baseball purchased full-page advertisements in major newspapers last week in which it announced the appointment of a prominent scientist to develop a urine test to detect human growth hormone. But other scientists are skeptical that such a test can be created for the relatively small amount of money baseball is pledging to invest so far. Baseball commissioner Bud Selig said in the ad that athletes' use of human growth hormone "represents a threat to all sports everywhere." Selig added that "science can provide new ways to combat" players who use such banned performance boosters, and that baseball was naming Don Catlin of UCLA to conduct a study on detecting hGH. Baseball has initially agreed to devote about $500,000 - an amount that Penn State University steroids expert Charles Yesalis called "chump change."
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2002
The mother of 19-year-old Eric Stennett - the man acquitted last year of killing a Baltimore police officer in a high-speed chase, and called a "player" in the drug trade after another arrest last weekend - discovered suspected cocaine in her apartment and notified the police. The mother, Margaret Beatty, confirmed last night accounts from Police Department sources that she had called 911 yesterday morning to report finding suspected drugs in her apartment in the 1100 block of Park Ave. Officers who went to the apartment found a bag about the size of a lacrosse ball, filled with $5 vials of suspected cocaine, the sources said.
NEWS
February 7, 2002
Enron's contributions bought its bosses time to take money, run Steve Chapman's column " `Soft money' overrated" (Opinion Commentary, Jan. 28) demonstrates that he is either ideologically blinded or a poor political analyst. He suggests that the Bush administration would have been tarred for rescuing Enron Corp., just as it's being tarred for not doing so now, in a "damned if you do ... " scenario. However, the administration isn't being faulted for not rescuing Enron, but for not investigating it as soon as it became aware of the problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Pekkanen and By Sarah Pekkanen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 17, 2000
Money. Is there anything else that inspires such a love-hate relationship in us? We never have enough of it. It's probably responsible for the breakup of more marriages than meddling mothers-in-law. But oh, what a great feeling when you reach into your pocket and find a forgotten $20 bill. Of course, we don't feel quite so passionately about our humble quarters, dimes, nickels and pennies. They're chump change - something to drop on the table along with the car keys at the end of the day, or stick in a glass jar to collect dust.
NEWS
By Douglas Lamborne and Douglas Lamborne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 17, 2000
OLDER GENERATIONS tend to look upon younger ones with a certain amount of despair: "Why, back in my day I had to walk five miles to school through 3 feet of snow." That sort of thing. Some grumble about the lack of voluntarism among baby boomers and those coming up behind them. Recent books, many of them seemingly written by Tom Brokaw, celebrate the sacrifices and service of seniors, extolling virtues that appear beyond the comprehension of younger people. One Old-timer draws comfort with word that about 65 kids have lined up at South River High School to give serious consideration to serving in the military.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 7, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In another overture to the middle class, President Clinton announced yesterday that his administration will cut $200 off closing costs for Americans who buy their first homes with mortgages backed by the Federal Housing Administration."
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 17, 1995
ANNAPOLIS -- Isn't this typical bad timing? I've come here in search of the elusive Bruce Bereano, but I can't locate him anywhere. Went to his $230,630 duplex on Duke of Gloucester Street. Nice pad, but nobody home. Went to his $318,230 house on Prince George Street. Great house, but nobody there, either. Went to his three townhouses on Pinkney Street, worth a combined $426,475. No answer when I knocked.Bereano's office says he's out of town. Maybe he's hanging out at his $380,000 condominium on Fenwick Island, Del. Or maybe he's in seclusion at his $775,000 home by Whitehall Creek.
NEWS
February 7, 2002
Enron's contributions bought its bosses time to take money, run Steve Chapman's column " `Soft money' overrated" (Opinion Commentary, Jan. 28) demonstrates that he is either ideologically blinded or a poor political analyst. He suggests that the Bush administration would have been tarred for rescuing Enron Corp., just as it's being tarred for not doing so now, in a "damned if you do ... " scenario. However, the administration isn't being faulted for not rescuing Enron, but for not investigating it as soon as it became aware of the problem.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 17, 1995
ANNAPOLIS -- Isn't this typical bad timing? I've come here in search of the elusive Bruce Bereano, but I can't locate him anywhere. Went to his $230,630 duplex on Duke of Gloucester Street. Nice pad, but nobody home. Went to his $318,230 house on Prince George Street. Great house, but nobody there, either. Went to his three townhouses on Pinkney Street, worth a combined $426,475. No answer when I knocked.Bereano's office says he's out of town. Maybe he's hanging out at his $380,000 condominium on Fenwick Island, Del. Or maybe he's in seclusion at his $775,000 home by Whitehall Creek.
NEWS
By Milton Bates | February 16, 1995
I SPOTTED my almost ancient, spherical chum, Fats Drobnak, lunching alone at Ikaros in Greektown the other day. Fats, my man, I greeted him. Mind if I join you? Why the bemused look?"Sootcherself. And what was the question again?"I was inquiring aboaut the source of the preoccupation evident in TC your countenance. Contemplating a few ponies on which you have placed win wagers lately only to see them falter at a critical time?"Naw. Ain't been to the track for a while. Clara's been givin' me grief about it. But, yeah, some things don't add up."
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