Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChuck Thompson
IN THE NEWS

Chuck Thompson

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | July 30, 1993
"Go to war, Miss Agnes!" Chuck Thompson's going to Cooperstown this weekend where he will be inducted into baseball's Hall of Fame as the 1993 recipient of the Ford C. Frick award.Many of his friends gathered at the Babe Ruth Museum yesterday morning for a special salute to Baltimore's all-time favorite broadcaster.Some who popped in to say nice things about Chuck were Orioles President Larry Lucchino, Babe Ruth Museum Board members Rowland King and Dan Lipstein, WBAL-radio's Jim West and Doug Roberts, and a tearful Rex Barney, who shared several stories about what it was like to travel with Chuck for more than 40 years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | May 21, 2009
Mary E. "Betty" Thompson, a retired country club banquet manager and widow of legendary sports broadcaster Chuck Thompson, died Tuesday of complications from dementia and kidney failure at a Pocomoke City nursing home. She was 82. Mary Elizabeth Cupp was born in Baltimore and raised on Aiken Street and at a family farm in Butler. She was a 1945 graduate of Clara Barton Vocational High School. Mrs. Thompson had worked as a cosmetics buyer for the old May Co. department store and later for the Baltimore Display Co. For many years, she was the banquet manager at the Turf Valley Country Club and the Hillendale Country Club, from which she retired in 1989.
Advertisement
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 24, 1996
Chuck Thompson arrived behind a microphone back in that distant, primordial time when big league baseball players left their gloves on the field between innings and scoreboards were still operated manually. He remembers broadcasting one game "by peeking through an aperture in the right field scoreboard where they hung the scores" and another from ground level only "10 or 15 feet behind home plate."And here he is, past his 75th birthday, past his induction into baseball's Hall of Fame, past the time when his contemporaries have hung up their larynx to dry, the voice still golden, the enthusiasm still buoyant, the microphone moved south from 33rd Street to Camden Yards, but he's still behind it.For nearly 40 years, he's been a voice of the Orioles, and for 30 years he was synonymous with the Colts of blessed memory, and now Thompson's put his whole professional life on paper, in a book called "Ain't the Beer Cold," which was the joyous cry that served as his signature call for years.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | August 26, 2007
A buzz of excitement filled the mezzanine of the Sheraton Inner Harbor Hotel. Scores of college-bound Baltimore high school graduates were gathered there with their families and supporters for CollegeBound Foundation's 19th Annual Scholars' Luncheon, including Mischa Minor, 2007 Scholar of the Year. As they waited for the ballroom doors to open for the luncheon, giggling groups of teenagers compared notes on where they had gone to school and which colleges they'd be attending, thanks to their CollegeBound scholarships.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | December 12, 2005
There wasn't much talk of cold beer or of going to war - this was church, after all - but friends of beloved sports broadcaster Chuck Thompson had plenty to remember him by as they gathered outside St. Leo's in Little Italy yesterday. The longtime radio voice of the Orioles and the Colts was known to Baltimore for his catch phrases "Ain't the beer cold!" and "Go to war, Miss Agnes," but he was known here as a man whose generosity helped buoy a congregation by restoring its church. About 300 people, including Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., came to honor Thompson for helping to raise nearly $300,000 for a furnace and a new roof for the brick Roman Catholic church on South Exeter Street, where he was a member until his death at age 83 in March.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | February 11, 1993
One time, gotta be 30 years ago, I drive past Conlon Field in Northwest Baltimore, around the corner from the clubhouse at the Forest Park Golf Course.Little League game going on. Gotta stop and watch a few innings, for old times' sake. Gotta remember the way things were, a few years earlier, when I'd been out there myself, in the Howard Park Little League, stuffing a carrot into my cheek like chewing tobacco and pretending to be an Orioles second baseman named Billy Gardner.To each, his own fantasy.
SPORTS
By David Steele | March 7, 2005
IT WAS THE spring of 1977. I was 12 years old, living in Landover, pondering my upcoming ascent to high school and sitting at a crossroads. I needed a baseball team to call my own, and it was obvious by then, six years after the Senators moved, that my hometown was not going to provide me with one. I swallowed hard and told myself, "It's the Orioles or nothing." One night soon after, on the transistor next to my bed, I tuned in the D.C. station carrying the games. Guess who was there to welcome me to Orioles baseball, to Memorial Stadium and to Baltimore?
FEATURES
By Randi Henderson | October 3, 1991
"It was a ramshackle, beat-up old place," Chuck Thompson remembers fondly. "It was not particularly attractive, not very pleasant and parking was less than adequate."But it served its purpose."The man who holds perhaps more memories of Memorial Stadium than any other human being adds a quick qualifier to his recollection:"When they began to reconstruct, it became quite a ballpark, didn't it?"Chuck Thompson, the longtime radio and TV voice of both the Baltimore Orioles and Baltimore Colts, has broadcast more games than he's willing to count from within the confines of this once-ramshackle stadium.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker and Michael Olesker,SUN COLUMNIST | March 7, 2005
His was the Voice of Summer. Across five decades of Baltimore Orioles baseball, those familiar tones arrived in bedrooms and barrooms, in kitchens and in cars strung out along dark lonesome roads. The athletes came and went with the years, as athletes do, but Chuck Thompson held things together. He brought us the ballgames of summer, and these helped turn us into a community. He was there every autumn, too, in a now-vanished ballpark on 33rd Street where he led the Sunday worship services for a religion called the Baltimore Colts.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | August 1, 1993
Cooperstown, N.Y. -- When he walked away from retirement three years ago, Chuck Thompson didn't realize he was stepping onto the path that would lead him to the Hall of Fame."
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | June 24, 2007
Nineteen years ago this month, I wrote my first column for The Sun. Cal Ripken Jr. had played in something like 800 straight games. Art Modell's football team had almost another decade to go in Cleveland. I wrote more than 2,500 columns after that first one, covering every sport from baseball to football to, well, ice dancing and cross country skiing. This is the end of the line. I'm leaving The Sun. I had more fun than anyone deserves to have with any job. My bosses sent me to 10 countries and 36 of the 50 states.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | February 23, 2007
Abig thumbs-up to Mid-Atlantic Sports Network for hiring Gary Thorne as lead play-by-play announcer for Orioles television. Here's what I'm looking forward to: bottom of the ninth, two outs, game tied, Brian Roberts on second. Miguel Tejada singles to left, Roberts tears around third, there's a play at the plate ... Thorne expresses excitement about as well as any sportscaster I've heard. Maybe my memory is fading, but back when I used to watch hockey regularly, he yelled better than any other guy on the air. Thorne is an accomplished professional and potentially the best dedicated-to-TV voice - not counting the great radio men Jon Miller and Chuck Thompson - for Orioles fans since Mel Proctor.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | June 12, 2006
In case you missed it, the Colorado Rockies traded former Oriole Eli Marrero to the New York Mets for Kazuo Matsui and cash. It's now safe to say that Matsui was really, really over-hyped when he came to the United States. It's been a tough year for anyone named Matsui. I can think of at least two. Seeing so many comparisons between Brandon Fahey and Mark Belanger got me thinking about the left side of the Orioles' infield, back when Belanger and Brooks Robinson were collecting Gold Gloves.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | December 12, 2005
There wasn't much talk of cold beer or of going to war - this was church, after all - but friends of beloved sports broadcaster Chuck Thompson had plenty to remember him by as they gathered outside St. Leo's in Little Italy yesterday. The longtime radio voice of the Orioles and the Colts was known to Baltimore for his catch phrases "Ain't the beer cold!" and "Go to war, Miss Agnes," but he was known here as a man whose generosity helped buoy a congregation by restoring its church. About 300 people, including Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., came to honor Thompson for helping to raise nearly $300,000 for a furnace and a new roof for the brick Roman Catholic church on South Exeter Street, where he was a member until his death at age 83 in March.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | September 30, 2005
Chuck Thompson wasn't just a Hall of Fame sports announcer. He also was a husband, the kind who parked himself on a shopping mall bench while his wife roamed the stores. So his final resting place - in the courtyard of a revamped shopping mall - could not be more fitting. Six months after Thompson's death, his ashes have just been interred inside a giant outdoor fireplace at Hunt Valley Towne Centre. Betty Thompson says her late husband had wanted his remains sprinkled over the Loch Raven Reservoir, but turns out that's not allowed.
NEWS
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2005
The child drifted. She wore a pink life vest and the underpants she had gone swimming in. She held her drowned grandfather in her arms. Hours passed: one, two, then three. The sun started to sink over Herring Bay, and it rained. The child cried as the wind blew her farther out; sometimes, she screamed. But she never let go of her P-Pa, cradling his head above the water. The pair floated less than a thousand yards from shore, but to a 4-year-old girl, the shallows of the Chesapeake must have felt like the middle of the Atlantic.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Chris Kaltenbach and Kevin Cowherd and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2005
Articles published Monday and yesterday on the late sportscaster Chuck Thompson incorrectly characterized his honor from the Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1993, Mr. Thompson received the Hall of Fame's Ford C. Frick Award, which, though not signifying induction into the Hall, is the highest honor a baseball announcer can receive. When sports fans say there will never be another Chuck Thompson behind the microphone, they may be right. The death Sunday of the honey-voiced Baltimore play-by-play man, at age 83, marked the passing of an era in sports broadcasting, experts said yesterday, an era defined by such legends as Thompson, Harry Caray, Jack Buck, Red Barber and others, all now gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 21, 2005
Talk about your bright and shiny shindig! The Baltimore School for the Arts celebrated its 25th birthday last weekend at its annual "Expressions" gala, this year held at the Hippodrome. To honor the school's silver anniversary, the invitation encouraged the 2,200 guests to "express yourself in silver." Event co-chair Sally Michel glimmered in a silver tunic. Fellow co-chair Molly Shattuck glittered in a silver beaded top, satin skirt and rhinestone sandals. That was just for starters. Halima Aquinot sparkled in a silver beaded corset.
SPORTS
April 9, 2005
Steele makes no sense regarding black players David Steele's racially inspired column on Thursday ["Diamonds glitter even less in the black community"] was one of the most illogical pieces of sportswriting I have read in a long time. He tallies the number of American-born vs. Hispanic-born black players in baseball and calls any disparity in numbers "bad news." Good grief! Then he lists great black ballplayers from the past and bemoans that fewer are coming up from the youth of the cities.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.