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By Rachel Martin, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
Washington Chuck Berry at the Howard Theatre The legendary Chuck Berry is part of the lineup of performers celebrating the reopening of Washington's historic Howard Theatre. The Howard began a $29 million renovation in 2010 and reopened this month. The 100-year-old theater opened in 1910 and was a showcase for black artists, including Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald and Marvin Gaye. The renovated theater includes supper club-style seating for 650 that can be converted to standing room for more than 1,000.
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TRAVEL
By Rachel Martin, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
Washington Chuck Berry at the Howard Theatre The legendary Chuck Berry is part of the lineup of performers celebrating the reopening of Washington's historic Howard Theatre. The Howard began a $29 million renovation in 2010 and reopened this month. The 100-year-old theater opened in 1910 and was a showcase for black artists, including Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald and Marvin Gaye. The renovated theater includes supper club-style seating for 650 that can be converted to standing room for more than 1,000.
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NEWS
November 23, 1995
Peter Grant, 60, manager of hard rock groups Led Zeppelin and Bad Company and influential in the careers of dozens of other acts, died Tuesday of a heart attack in London. He also had managed the Yardbirds and worked with Gene Vincent, Little Richard, the Everly Brothers and Chuck Berry."Peter Grant will be remembered as the man who single-handedly turned rock music into a global business," said his spokeswoman, Judy Totton. "He was the foundation stone of the modern music industry."The London native took Chuck Berry to Great Britain from the United States and was one of the first proponents of the global touring circuit for performers -- with performers keeping up to 90 percent of the gate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
Dick Clark, who died Wednesday at the age of 82, is rightfully being hailed as a pioneer of popular culture. And that's fair enough. In the 1950s, '60s and '70s, the reach of his daily"American Bandstand"show and his myriad prime-time special productions was enormous. He was one of the most powerful producers in Hollywood, particularly in terms of his perceived ability to deliver a white, suburban, teenage audience to advertisers. His power was all the more valued on Madison Avenue because he was one of TV's first personalities associated with teen viewers at the very time that advertisers first started conceiving of teens as a lucrative audience with disposable income in its own right.
FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | May 19, 1995
London -- This could be 1959.Wembley Arena is packed. The crowd is dancing in the aisles like it's a sock hop. And on stage, Richard Wayne Penniman, Little Richard to his fans, is bashing the piano and shrieking, "Lucille."It doesn't matter that most of the audience has gray hair. And it doesn't even look the least bit peculiar that Little Richard, now 62, has to be helped atop the piano by some kid with a guitar.All that matters is the music."What you hear on the radio now is, bang-bang, rap," says Tegwen Denslow, a 55-year-old housewife who was chauffeured the concert by her 19-year-old son. "The old-time music is real music."
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | December 5, 2008
In the 1950s and '60s, American Jews and blacks had two glorious, complex and sometimes-fractious partnerships: civil rights and recording rights. Writer-director Darnell Martin goes for the throat of this killer subject in the scintillating Cadillac Records. Adrien Brody plays Leonard Chess, the Jewish founder of Chess Records who made the Cadillac his label's car of choice. In the 1950s, he put Muddy Waters and then Chuck Berry on the nation's turntables, and paid Alan Freed and other DJs to put them on the air. Thus did Chess, Waters, Berry and Freed invent rock 'n' roll.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
Dick Clark, who died Wednesday at the age of 82, is rightfully being hailed as a pioneer of popular culture. And that's fair enough. In the 1950s, '60s and '70s, the reach of his daily"American Bandstand"show and his myriad prime-time special productions was enormous. He was one of the most powerful producers in Hollywood, particularly in terms of his perceived ability to deliver a white, suburban, teenage audience to advertisers. His power was all the more valued on Madison Avenue because he was one of TV's first personalities associated with teen viewers at the very time that advertisers first started conceiving of teens as a lucrative audience with disposable income in its own right.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | January 29, 2006
Can you fathom any scenario where the Orioles would grant Javy Lopez's request - given to The Sun through his agent - for a three-year contract extension? For a 35-year-old catcher who might be forced to learn a new position? Me neither. The Orioles aren't finding much of a market for Lopez, and they'd like to keep his bat. But Ramon Hernandez is the starting catcher, which would leave first base for Lopez if he could handle it. He also could be used as the designated hitter, though he loathes that role.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 7, 1994
Originality really is overrated, particularly in rock. That's not to say fresh ideas have no place in the music -- obviously, they do, else everything would still sound like Elvis and Chuck Berry -- but let's face it. Whenever adjectives like "radical" and "innovative" are bandied about, most pop fans begin to suspect that something awfully unlistenable lurks in the wings.By rights, then, being unoriginal ought not seem such a great sin. Yet no sooner did Stone Temple Pilots make a dent in the alternative rock market than the band was pilloried for being overly imitative -- or, more specifically, for having stolen Pearl Jam's sound lock, stock and barre chord.
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | August 11, 2008
Three years ago, it would have been another silent summer day at Pimlico Race Course. But yesterday, the Virgin Mobile Festival brought a stew of sights, sounds and smells to the grassy infield. A steady stream of young people pushed past vendor tents, puffing on cigarettes and smearing their faces with sunscreen. Black Rebel Motorcycle Club cranked out scathing blues rock from the North Stage, and bodies bounced to Chromeo's electro-funk beats in the Dance Tent. The festival's impact is undeniable.
EXPLORE
July 6, 2011
Concerts Live and local The Columbia Village Centers Courtyard Concert Series continues with Ellis Woodward playing folk rock Thu., July 7, 6 p.m., at the Dorsey's Search Village Center. The Dave Chappel Band performs blues-rock Fri., July 8, 6 p.m., at the River Hill Village Center. Gary and the Groove plays "good time rock 'n' roll" July 8, 11:30 a.m., at the Kings Contrivance Village Center. Lone Mountain will perform bluegrass July 8, 6 p.m., at the Harper's Choice Village Center.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | December 5, 2008
In the 1950s and '60s, American Jews and blacks had two glorious, complex and sometimes-fractious partnerships: civil rights and recording rights. Writer-director Darnell Martin goes for the throat of this killer subject in the scintillating Cadillac Records. Adrien Brody plays Leonard Chess, the Jewish founder of Chess Records who made the Cadillac his label's car of choice. In the 1950s, he put Muddy Waters and then Chuck Berry on the nation's turntables, and paid Alan Freed and other DJs to put them on the air. Thus did Chess, Waters, Berry and Freed invent rock 'n' roll.
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | August 11, 2008
Three years ago, it would have been another silent summer day at Pimlico Race Course. But yesterday, the Virgin Mobile Festival brought a stew of sights, sounds and smells to the grassy infield. A steady stream of young people pushed past vendor tents, puffing on cigarettes and smearing their faces with sunscreen. Black Rebel Motorcycle Club cranked out scathing blues rock from the North Stage, and bodies bounced to Chromeo's electro-funk beats in the Dance Tent. The festival's impact is undeniable.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, Alex Plimack, Courtney Pomeroy and Rashod D. Ollison | August 7, 2008
It's good to have options. At this weekend's Virgin Mobile Festival, more than 40 performers will be vying for your attention on two main stages and in a dance tent. One of the biggest challenges is deciding whom to watch. Would you rather catch classic performers like Bob Dylan and Chuck Berry or hot hip-hop acts like Lil' Wayne? Before you pick and choose, it's good to know a little bit about each act. Here's the skinny on all the bands at this year's festival. The Black Keys Essentials: On its latest album, Attack & Release, the Keys went into the studio with producer Danger Mouse and came out with a new sound, complete with keyboards and high-end production.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | January 29, 2006
Can you fathom any scenario where the Orioles would grant Javy Lopez's request - given to The Sun through his agent - for a three-year contract extension? For a 35-year-old catcher who might be forced to learn a new position? Me neither. The Orioles aren't finding much of a market for Lopez, and they'd like to keep his bat. But Ramon Hernandez is the starting catcher, which would leave first base for Lopez if he could handle it. He also could be used as the designated hitter, though he loathes that role.
SPORTS
By JEFF ZREBIEC and JEFF ZREBIEC,SUN REPORTER | December 11, 2005
The Orioles have received several inquiries about shortstop Miguel Tejada, but at this point, the club's focus is on persuading the All-Star to back off his trade demand. Orioles officials spoke to Tejada at around 8:30 last night after they spent most of the day talking with Tejada's representatives, Diego Bentz and Fernando Cuza. "We have spoken to Miguel Tejada and his representatives," executive vice president Mike Flanagan said. "We have spoken to his representatives for the better part of the day, and the only way we can categorize it at this time is that Miguel wants to win."
SPORTS
By JEFF ZREBIEC and JEFF ZREBIEC,SUN REPORTER | December 11, 2005
The Orioles have received several inquiries about shortstop Miguel Tejada, but at this point, the club's focus is on persuading the All-Star to back off his trade demand. Orioles officials spoke to Tejada at around 8:30 last night after they spent most of the day talking with Tejada's representatives, Diego Bentz and Fernando Cuza. "We have spoken to Miguel Tejada and his representatives," executive vice president Mike Flanagan said. "We have spoken to his representatives for the better part of the day, and the only way we can categorize it at this time is that Miguel wants to win."
EXPLORE
July 6, 2011
Concerts Live and local The Columbia Village Centers Courtyard Concert Series continues with Ellis Woodward playing folk rock Thu., July 7, 6 p.m., at the Dorsey's Search Village Center. The Dave Chappel Band performs blues-rock Fri., July 8, 6 p.m., at the River Hill Village Center. Gary and the Groove plays "good time rock 'n' roll" July 8, 11:30 a.m., at the Kings Contrivance Village Center. Lone Mountain will perform bluegrass July 8, 6 p.m., at the Harper's Choice Village Center.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2003
NEW ORLEANS - On Thanksgiving weekend, the Web site OriolesHangout.com had a posting on its message board titled, "It's Nov. 30. Do you know where our GMs are?" The fan base was already restless. The Philadelphia Phillies had traded for closer Billy Wagner. The Boston Red Sox were putting the finishing touches on the Curt Schilling trade. Free-agent outfielder Gary Sheffield was dining on George Steinbrenner's tab. And the Orioles? Nothing. Nearly two weeks later, the story hasn't changed, though it hasn't been for a lack of effort from Orioles vice presidents Mike Flanagan and Jim Beattie.
NEWS
November 23, 1995
Peter Grant, 60, manager of hard rock groups Led Zeppelin and Bad Company and influential in the careers of dozens of other acts, died Tuesday of a heart attack in London. He also had managed the Yardbirds and worked with Gene Vincent, Little Richard, the Everly Brothers and Chuck Berry."Peter Grant will be remembered as the man who single-handedly turned rock music into a global business," said his spokeswoman, Judy Totton. "He was the foundation stone of the modern music industry."The London native took Chuck Berry to Great Britain from the United States and was one of the first proponents of the global touring circuit for performers -- with performers keeping up to 90 percent of the gate.
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