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By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 19, 1997
MOSCOW -- Some Russians are wondering why Anatoly B. Chubais, the first deputy prime minister and a liberal reformer, is in trouble over a $90,000 book advance -- described as a bribe.That kind of money, they say, is small change in the world of official corruption."It's not $1 billion, it's only $90,000," scoffs Lilia Shevtsova, a political analyst and widely published writer. "It means something else is behind it."The alleged bribe is a colorful detail in a larger, murkier story, woven with corruption and intrigue.
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NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 18, 2005
MOSCOW - Russia's top utilities official, hated by many Russians for engineering the country's murky post-Soviet state sell-offs, survived an assassination attempt yesterday when assailants attacked his armored car with a roadside bomb and a hail of gunfire. No one was injured in the attack, which left the hood of Anatoly Chubais' black BMW riddled with bullets. Chubais' driver was able to speed away and get the businessman to his offices in downtown Moscow, where he heads Russia's state-controlled electricity monopoly, Unified Energy Systems.
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NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | September 7, 1996
MOSCOW -- He stays under a shadow's edge, as befits a Kremlin strategist, but presidential aide Anatoly Chubais has become Russia's leading power broker while President Boris N. Yeltsin is sick on the sidelines.With Yeltsin scheduled for heart surgery after two months of being mostly off the job, and with the Kremlin roiled by internal conflict, Chubais, the Kremlin chief of staff, increasingly is calling the shots in Russia."The fact is that Yeltsin is not in charge," said Sergei Baburin, deputy speaker of the State Duma, the lower house of parliament.
NEWS
March 14, 1998
IT IS A measure of Russia's instability that every time Boris N. Yeltsin gets sick, speculation soars over the true state of his health. That, in turn, triggers a guessing game about his eventual successor.Look at the jockeying in Moscow these days. As soon as news began to spread that the 67-year-old president was ill (throat trouble this time, according to the official Kremlin announcement), billionaire banker and manipulator Boris Berezovsky branded Mr. Yeltsin's deputy and economic reform planner Anatoly Chubais a "total failure."
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 5, 1996
MOSCOW -- Perhaps nothing was more symbolic of theschism between the old and new Russia than the day Anatoly Chubais, President Boris N. Yeltsin's chief of staff, used a personal computer at the head table during a big government meeting.Flipping open a laptop would be considered business-as-usual in other parts of the world. But when many Russians saw Chubais do it, they saw only the impudence of a techno-brat who keeps stomping his modern, westernized footprints over the gray status quo.He has been the gatekeeper to Yeltsin during the six months the president has been largely out of sight with heart problems and bypass surgery.
NEWS
November 22, 1997
THE TALE OF how six Moscow bankers -- formerly little-known cogs in the Soviet system -- came to control Russia's post-communist economy involves ruthless machinations and collusions. Some of the main characters not only have bought access to the highest levels of Kremlin decision-making but make the decisions themselves.Don't expect exposes about this economic power grab any time soon.Instead, Russian media controlled by the bankers are now having a field day with the doings of First Deputy Prime Minister Anatoly B. Chubais, a leading liberal reformer in President Boris N. Yeltsin's government.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 18, 2005
MOSCOW - Russia's top utilities official, hated by many Russians for engineering the country's murky post-Soviet state sell-offs, survived an assassination attempt yesterday when assailants attacked his armored car with a roadside bomb and a hail of gunfire. No one was injured in the attack, which left the hood of Anatoly Chubais' black BMW riddled with bullets. Chubais' driver was able to speed away and get the businessman to his offices in downtown Moscow, where he heads Russia's state-controlled electricity monopoly, Unified Energy Systems.
NEWS
March 14, 1998
IT IS A measure of Russia's instability that every time Boris N. Yeltsin gets sick, speculation soars over the true state of his health. That, in turn, triggers a guessing game about his eventual successor.Look at the jockeying in Moscow these days. As soon as news began to spread that the 67-year-old president was ill (throat trouble this time, according to the official Kremlin announcement), billionaire banker and manipulator Boris Berezovsky branded Mr. Yeltsin's deputy and economic reform planner Anatoly Chubais a "total failure."
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 2, 1996
MOSCOW -- When President Boris N. Yeltsin goes under the surgeon's knife -- which the Kremlin says could be "any day" -- control of Russia will be in the hands of two tough political survivors from very different generations.Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin, the plodding, beetle-browed Soviet apparatchik-turned-natural-gas tycoon, officially becomes acting president during Yeltsin's heart bypass operation.Anatoly B. Chubais, the presidential chief of staff and liberal Wunderkind who helped push Russia into a free market economy, effectively will share power with him.The two are the longest-surviving members of Yeltsin's administration, a tumultuous five-year term that has seen even the president's best friends sacked.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 12, 1997
MOSCOW -- Continuing to reassert a strong grip on power after months of illness, President Boris N. Yeltsin ordered a drastic reorganization of his entire government yesterday in an attempt to push Russia out of its economic and social difficulties.Yeltsin gave Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin and his new first deputy, Anatoly B. Chubais, a week to form a new Cabinet.The new government is expected to be heavily loaded with radical market reformers such as Chubais, the young capitalist who spearheaded Russia's privatization program, only to be fired and then brought back to engineer Yeltsin's come-from-behind re-election victory in July.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 28, 1997
MOSCOW -- Boris A. Berezovsky's emergence as one of the power brokers of the new Russia was confirmed spectacularly in 1994. Splashy assassinations were just coming into vogue as the favored way to settle business disputes. Someone attached a bomb to Berezovsky's car and blew it up on a busy Moscow street. His driver was killed, but Berezovsky was unharmed.He was caught up in another explosion last week. This one was political. His hand reportedly lighted the fuse on the bombshell that blasted Anatoly B. Chubais' reputation to smithereens.
NEWS
November 22, 1997
THE TALE OF how six Moscow bankers -- formerly little-known cogs in the Soviet system -- came to control Russia's post-communist economy involves ruthless machinations and collusions. Some of the main characters not only have bought access to the highest levels of Kremlin decision-making but make the decisions themselves.Don't expect exposes about this economic power grab any time soon.Instead, Russian media controlled by the bankers are now having a field day with the doings of First Deputy Prime Minister Anatoly B. Chubais, a leading liberal reformer in President Boris N. Yeltsin's government.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 19, 1997
MOSCOW -- Some Russians are wondering why Anatoly B. Chubais, the first deputy prime minister and a liberal reformer, is in trouble over a $90,000 book advance -- described as a bribe.That kind of money, they say, is small change in the world of official corruption."It's not $1 billion, it's only $90,000," scoffs Lilia Shevtsova, a political analyst and widely published writer. "It means something else is behind it."The alleged bribe is a colorful detail in a larger, murkier story, woven with corruption and intrigue.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 15, 1997
MOSCOW -- It's known in the former Communist world as "the sausage principle" of self-preservation: Each time a leadership comes under scrutiny for corruption, it slices off the rotten ends and claims there's still something worth saving in the middle.As the Kremlin leadership maneuvered around yet another bribery accusation yesterday, President Boris N. Yeltsin fired a deputy chief of staff while leaving in place his most senior and valued aides -- despite their having been touched by the same privatization scandal.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 12, 1997
MOSCOW -- Continuing to reassert a strong grip on power after months of illness, President Boris N. Yeltsin ordered a drastic reorganization of his entire government yesterday in an attempt to push Russia out of its economic and social difficulties.Yeltsin gave Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin and his new first deputy, Anatoly B. Chubais, a week to form a new Cabinet.The new government is expected to be heavily loaded with radical market reformers such as Chubais, the young capitalist who spearheaded Russia's privatization program, only to be fired and then brought back to engineer Yeltsin's come-from-behind re-election victory in July.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 11, 1997
MOSCOW -- The man whom President Boris N. Yeltsin sacked as his chief bodyguard last summer wound up the first part of his come-back plan yesterday by winning a parliamentary seat from the central Russian town of Tula.Russians are waiting nervously to see how quickly the triumphant Alexander V. Korzhakov, whose place in the 450-seat State Duma, the lower house of parliament, gives him immunity from prosecution, will carry out part two of his plan -- to get revenge on his many political enemies by revealing the secrets he learned as a Kremlin insider.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | June 11, 1994
MOSCOW -- Moscow Mayor Yuri Luzhkov just keeps getting stronger and stronger.Yesterday, President Boris N. Yeltsin himself declared that Mr. Luzhkov was free to ignore the national government's policies on privatization. All of Russia might be going in one direction in the great post-Soviet sell-off -- but not Moscow.And privatization is only his most recent success. For six months Mr. Luzhkov has been asserting and extending his control over the city in different ways.In October he had the police drive away itinerant traders from the non-Russian fringes of the former Soviet Union.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 5, 1996
MOSCOW -- Asked about the health of President Boris N. Yeltsin, his chief of staff, Anatoly Chubais, admitted yesterday that there was a problem.Yeltsin, he said, was fine. But Chubais conceded that the Kremlin had mishandled growing skepticism about the 65-year-old president's condition. He refused to describe Yeltsin's symptoms, but promised that a "new information policy" would be unveiled in the next few days. "The less official information there is," he said, "the more rumors, conjectures and speculations there are."
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 5, 1996
MOSCOW -- Perhaps nothing was more symbolic of theschism between the old and new Russia than the day Anatoly Chubais, President Boris N. Yeltsin's chief of staff, used a personal computer at the head table during a big government meeting.Flipping open a laptop would be considered business-as-usual in other parts of the world. But when many Russians saw Chubais do it, they saw only the impudence of a techno-brat who keeps stomping his modern, westernized footprints over the gray status quo.He has been the gatekeeper to Yeltsin during the six months the president has been largely out of sight with heart problems and bypass surgery.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 2, 1996
MOSCOW -- When President Boris N. Yeltsin goes under the surgeon's knife -- which the Kremlin says could be "any day" -- control of Russia will be in the hands of two tough political survivors from very different generations.Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin, the plodding, beetle-browed Soviet apparatchik-turned-natural-gas tycoon, officially becomes acting president during Yeltsin's heart bypass operation.Anatoly B. Chubais, the presidential chief of staff and liberal Wunderkind who helped push Russia into a free market economy, effectively will share power with him.The two are the longest-surviving members of Yeltsin's administration, a tumultuous five-year term that has seen even the president's best friends sacked.
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