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SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2000
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- A quality baseball scout can recognize talent in the most unusual places, under some of the most unorthodox conditions. For the Orioles' Jesus "Chu" Halabi, that can mean a young boy chucking rocks at a moving target. It can mean changing a kid's life forever, something else Halabi knows plenty about. Halabi, who scouts Central and South America and parts of the Caribbean, found Radhames Dykhoff about 200 yards from the house he had built in Aruba. Dykhoff was 13 and never had played organized baseball.
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SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 21, 2005
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - In every life, there should come at least one moment of perfect clarity, and mine came yesterday when Sidney Ponson told me that I ought to think about losing some weight. It's time to get my act together, so I'm going on the Sidney Ponson Diet, which is a little like the South Beach Diet, except that you actually spend a lot of time at South Beach while you're on it. "I eat grilled fish every day," Sidney said. "I eat meat only once a week and pasta once a week."
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NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Patrick Ercolano and Bruce Reid and Patrick Ercolano,Staff Writers Staff writer Richard Irwin contributed to this article | May 12, 1992
Members of an Asian-American family in Cockeysville were bound, and their home was ransacked, early yesterday by four young Asian-American men armed with knives, Baltimore County police said.Sgt. Stephen R. Doarnberger, a police spokesman, said about $6,000 in cash was taken from the home during the robbery, which was similar to robberies of Asian-American families in other cities around the nation.Some jewelry also was taken from the home of Jason Chu, 42, the owner of Tony Cheng's Restaurant at 801 N. Charles St.Police have not determined the value of the stolen items.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | January 18, 2005
ORANJESTAD, Aruba - Chu Halabi wheeled his SUV into a parking space near his chiropractor's office one morning last week. "Got to get my back whacked before I leave town," the Orioles' longtime Aruban scout said. He was headed for Fort Lauderdale, Fla., where he would stay with Orioles pitcher Sidney Ponson, whom Halabi signed years ago and still counsels. His job was to attach himself to Ponson, who was recently detained for 11 days in Aruba after a beach fight. Parenting Ponson meant Halabi also would be catching Ponson during some of the pitcher's workouts before spring training.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 29, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Senate committee looking into campaign fund-raising abuses will hear today from two Maryland women who funneled $25,000 to the Democratic Party in what investigators say was a favor to a man who could not legally donate the money because he was not a U.S. resident.The women, Yue F. Chu and Xi Ping Wang, housewives and neighbors in Gaithersburg, have been granted immunity from prosecution by the Governmental Affairs Committee, whose investigators say the women were low-level participants in a money-laundering scheme.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2003
Two Taiwanese businessmen who tried to purchase sensitive U.S. military equipment for Iran were exposed through an undercover sting operation in Maryland, federal authorities said yesterday. The two are charged with conspiracy to violate U.S. export laws by attempting to buy early warning radar, Cobra attack helicopters, night-vision goggles and satellite photos for Tehran in violation of the U.S. embargo against Iran. Authorities said none of the equipment was successfully shipped out of the United States.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Patrick Ercolano and Bruce Reid and Patrick Ercolano,Staff Writers Staff writer Richard Irwin contributed to this story | May 11, 1992
Members of an Asian-American family in Cockeysville were bound and their home ransacked early today by four young Asian-American men armed with knives, Baltimore County police said.Sgt. Stephen R. Doarnberger, a police spokesman, said about $6,000 was taken from the home during the robbery, which was similar to robberies of Asian-American families in other cities around the country.In what police know as "home invasions," gangs of young Asian-American men, sometimes using violence and terror, prey on well-to-do Asian-American families.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | May 30, 1999
CAPITALISM'S PR problem is that its main goal -- making money and minding Numero Uno -- disappoints the philosophers. Its impressive humanitarian feats -- raising living standards, financing culture, prolonging life span -- are just side effects.There must be a better way, people have said for two centuries. Surely capital aimed with benevolent intent does more good than capital aimed at profits alone. Karl Marx thought so. So did Eugene Debs.And so, in its way, does Bethesda's Calvert Group.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2000
Dave Armstrong scans the water for signs of the Chinese dragon-boat racing team he's coaching. It's not near the marina at Lighthouse Point where it should be. Nor is it anywhere in sight along the Northwest Harbor. He steers the powerboat he uses to give on-the-spot instructions north toward the Inner Harbor. "This team," he says, "is too much about fun and not enough work." When he overtakes the errant team yards off Pier Six, the boaters don't look as if they're having fun. Puffing and sweating in the late-afternoon haze, they pause as Armstrong slows his boat alongside their canoe.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2004
The judges signaled to Rachel Gawell to stop midway through her Haydn cello piece. Same with the Bach prelude - she'd only played the beginning when, to her surprise, Ilya Finkelshteyn, principal cellist for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, gave her two thumbs up. "I wondered, `Did he do that to everybody?'" the 16-year-old said later. Many of the 22 students auditioning before BSO judges recently did get pencil taps and other kinds of bravos, but only four, including Gawell, a junior at the Baltimore School for the Arts, got the nod to share the stage with international cello star Yo-Yo Ma. Today, the BSO is scheduled to announce to the public the names of those chosen to play with Ma at the Feb. 5 opening of the Music Center at Strathmore, the BSO's new home in Bethesda.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2004
The judges signaled to Rachel Gawell to stop midway through her Haydn cello piece. Same with the Bach prelude - she'd only played the beginning when, to her surprise, Ilya Finkelshteyn, principal cellist for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, gave her two thumbs up. "I wondered, `Did he do that to everybody?'" the 16-year-old said later. Many of the 22 students auditioning before BSO judges recently did get pencil taps and other kinds of bravos, but only four, including Gawell, a junior at the Baltimore School for the Arts, got the nod to share the stage with international cello star Yo-Yo Ma. Today, the BSO is scheduled to announce to the public the names of those chosen to play with Ma at the Feb. 5 opening of the Music Center at Strathmore, the BSO's new home in Bethesda.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2003
Two Taiwanese businessmen who tried to purchase sensitive U.S. military equipment for Iran were exposed through an undercover sting operation in Maryland, federal authorities said yesterday. The two are charged with conspiracy to violate U.S. export laws by attempting to buy early warning radar, Cobra attack helicopters, night-vision goggles and satellite photos for Tehran in violation of the U.S. embargo against Iran. Authorities said none of the equipment was successfully shipped out of the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 8, 2002
David Chu's China Bistro looks like a typical Chinese restaurant. The waiters are Asian. The menu lists all the usual suspects: egg foo young, a pu pu platter, kung pao chicken and Peking duck. Chopsticks and steaming pots of tea deck the tables. But look again. A bearded man in a yarmulke walks in and out of the kitchen. There's a small sink in the foyer between the restrooms. No shellfish or pork is on the menu. And on a recent night, all beef dishes had to be off the tables before sundown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2000
Dave Armstrong scans the water for signs of the Chinese dragon-boat racing team he's coaching. It's not near the marina at Lighthouse Point where it should be. Nor is it anywhere in sight along the Northwest Harbor. He steers the powerboat he uses to give on-the-spot instructions north toward the Inner Harbor. "This team," he says, "is too much about fun and not enough work." When he overtakes the errant team yards off Pier Six, the boaters don't look as if they're having fun. Puffing and sweating in the late-afternoon haze, they pause as Armstrong slows his boat alongside their canoe.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2000
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- A quality baseball scout can recognize talent in the most unusual places, under some of the most unorthodox conditions. For the Orioles' Jesus "Chu" Halabi, that can mean a young boy chucking rocks at a moving target. It can mean changing a kid's life forever, something else Halabi knows plenty about. Halabi, who scouts Central and South America and parts of the Caribbean, found Radhames Dykhoff about 200 yards from the house he had built in Aruba. Dykhoff was 13 and never had played organized baseball.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | May 30, 1999
CAPITALISM'S PR problem is that its main goal -- making money and minding Numero Uno -- disappoints the philosophers. Its impressive humanitarian feats -- raising living standards, financing culture, prolonging life span -- are just side effects.There must be a better way, people have said for two centuries. Surely capital aimed with benevolent intent does more good than capital aimed at profits alone. Karl Marx thought so. So did Eugene Debs.And so, in its way, does Bethesda's Calvert Group.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 30, 1997
WASHINGTON -- An FBI agent investigating campaign finance abuses testified yesterday that Yah Lin "Charlie" Trie, a former Arkansas restaurateur turned Democratic fund-raiser, engaged in a money laundering scheme and tried to enrich himself by capitalizing on his friendship with President Clinton.Aided by charts with arrows pointing in all directions, the agent, Jerry Campane, told the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee that he believed that Trie, his wife and his secretary contributed $220,000 to the Democratic Party between 1994 and 1996 by using "a steady stream of funds from foreign sources," mostly from a business partner in Asia.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 21, 2005
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - In every life, there should come at least one moment of perfect clarity, and mine came yesterday when Sidney Ponson told me that I ought to think about losing some weight. It's time to get my act together, so I'm going on the Sidney Ponson Diet, which is a little like the South Beach Diet, except that you actually spend a lot of time at South Beach while you're on it. "I eat grilled fish every day," Sidney said. "I eat meat only once a week and pasta once a week."
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 30, 1997
WASHINGTON -- An FBI agent investigating campaign finance abuses testified yesterday that Yah Lin "Charlie" Trie, a former Arkansas restaurateur turned Democratic fund-raiser, engaged in a money laundering scheme and tried to enrich himself by capitalizing on his friendship with President Clinton.Aided by charts with arrows pointing in all directions, the agent, Jerry Campane, told the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee that he believed that Trie, his wife and his secretary contributed $220,000 to the Democratic Party between 1994 and 1996 by using "a steady stream of funds from foreign sources," mostly from a business partner in Asia.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 29, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Senate committee looking into campaign fund-raising abuses will hear today from two Maryland women who funneled $25,000 to the Democratic Party in what investigators say was a favor to a man who could not legally donate the money because he was not a U.S. resident.The women, Yue F. Chu and Xi Ping Wang, housewives and neighbors in Gaithersburg, have been granted immunity from prosecution by the Governmental Affairs Committee, whose investigators say the women were low-level participants in a money-laundering scheme.
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