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July 28, 2006
Cecelia E. Johnson, a retired Baltimore educator and award-winning grower of chrysanthemums, died of cancer July 21 at her Columbia home. She was 88. Cecelia Ernestine Brown, who was known as Ernestine and Teenie, was born and raised on her family's farm in Surry, Va., one of 10 children. She earned a teaching certificate in 1939 from St. Paul's College in Lawrenceville, Va., and began teaching elementary students in Isle of Wight County, Va. In the late 1940s, she moved to Washington and worked for the U.S. Treasury Department, supervising the data entry staff.
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By Hannah Moulden, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
Washington fallFRINGE If you're into experimental performance and supporting a good cause, check out fallFRINGE, sponsored by Capital Fringe, a nonprofit whose mission is to promote the arts in D.C. fallFRINGE gathers the best performers from past Capital Fringe Festivals and brings them together for a week-long event of performing arts. The array of performers at fallFRINGE includes the Victorian Lyric Opera Company, Sheldon Scott and Michael Merino as they perform comedy, puppetry, drama and more.
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NEWS
By Photos by Chiaki Kawajiri and Photos by Chiaki Kawajiri,Sun photographer | November 12, 2007
Chrysanthemums are in bloom in Baltimore. Under the theme "Asian Roots: The Art of the Chrysanthemum," the Howard Peters Rawlings Conservatory and Botanic Gardens has been displaying the fall flower Tuesday through Sunday since Nov. 2. The flowers, also called mums, originated in Asia and northeastern Europe. The show at Rawlings Conservatory in Druid Hill Park features origami displays and hundreds of chrysanthemums, grown and assembled by members of the Baltimore Department of Recreation and Parks.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2008
Why don't my chrysanthemums keep blooming through the whole fall season? Most years, I have to buy mums twice. Then they die! Aren't they supposed to be perennials? Yes, chrysanthemums are perennials, but to survive the winter they need time for their root systems to get established. Plant early in the fall and keep them moist by supplementing rainfall through autumn. Protect tender roots with evergreen boughs or an airy mulch if you cut the mums down after frost kills the tops. Remove any mulch early in spring.
FEATURES
By Amalie Adler Ascher | February 8, 1992
FleurettesBotanical name: Chrysanthemum x morifoliumPronunciation: chris-ANth-e-mumFamily: Compositae (Daisy)Origin: Asia, EuropeClass: Annual/house plantDisplay period: VariableHeight: 9 to 12 inchesEnvironment: Bright, indirect lightFor a table centerpiece or other such decoration, or on a porch or patio, fleurettes are made-to-order.Developed by Yoder Brothers Inc. of Barberton, Ohio, this innovative class of chrysanthemums bears inch-size flowers in such profusion that they cover the plant with a sheet of color.
NEWS
By Nancy Brachey and Nancy Brachey,Knight-Ridder newspapers | October 13, 1991
When people think of autumn color, they look to the trees. But, too often, the burden of carrying a whole season's beauty rests upon their strong branches.Chrysanthemums, of course, share the glory. In eye-catching colors of golden yellows, sparkling purples and mellow reds, potted chrysanthemums purchased at garden centers provide the easiest and quickest way to give your front steps or flower beds the look of autumn.Yet there is more to autumn in the garden than just colorful foliage and gorgeous chrysanthemums.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1999
Joel Greer, a private pilot, retired real estate developer and part-time farmer, never thought much about decorating the landscape around his Taneytown farm when he began raising chrysanthemums.But that's what he did.Greer has grown 12,000 chrysanthemums for the past two years along Old Taneytown Road, covering his acre-sized front lawn like a brightly colored quilt."It's absolutely gorgeous," said Jean Masters of Taylorsville, who stopped recently with her husband, Edward, to admire the view and purchase some of the mums.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 19, 1999
ALL SUMMER long, we watched the hillside at the Doepkens farm, waiting and wondering.What surprise had Bill Doepkens concocted this time? For the past five years, Doepkens has spent Memorial Day weekend planting chrysanthemums at his Davidsonville farm.Most of his plants are arranged in long, straight rows. But the hillside next to the intersection of Route 424 and U.S. 50 is unique, because that's where Doepkens creates his annual display of field art, a living mural composed of hundreds and hundreds of chrysanthemums.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1996
Your canary-yellow day lilies are fading and the brilliant purple coneflowers have seen better days, but you don't have to give up the idea of color in your garden just because it's the end of summer. Fall blooms can be every bit as spectacular, particularly if you look beyond the chrysanthemum (although some new varieties of mums come in wonderful lavenders and other unexpected colors).By the beginning of next month, a new crop of bedding plants will start appearing in garden centers. Fall-blooming annuals that you buy and plant during the next few weeks will brighten darkening days well past the first frost.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 2002
ONE OF AUTUMN'S most beautiful traditions is unfolding on a peaceful hillside in Davidsonville. For eight years, Bill Doepkens has planted a flower mural on the sloping field next to his family's farmhouse. Commuters, children on school buses and people from around the area pass the field every day, watch the chrysanthemums fill the design, and try to identify this year's picture. The Doepkens farm, at Route 424 and U.S. 50, has been an important part of local agriculture since Maryland's Colonial days, when the land was part of the Middle Plantation.
NEWS
By Photos by Chiaki Kawajiri and Photos by Chiaki Kawajiri,Sun photographer | November 12, 2007
Chrysanthemums are in bloom in Baltimore. Under the theme "Asian Roots: The Art of the Chrysanthemum," the Howard Peters Rawlings Conservatory and Botanic Gardens has been displaying the fall flower Tuesday through Sunday since Nov. 2. The flowers, also called mums, originated in Asia and northeastern Europe. The show at Rawlings Conservatory in Druid Hill Park features origami displays and hundreds of chrysanthemums, grown and assembled by members of the Baltimore Department of Recreation and Parks.
NEWS
July 28, 2006
Cecelia E. Johnson, a retired Baltimore educator and award-winning grower of chrysanthemums, died of cancer July 21 at her Columbia home. She was 88. Cecelia Ernestine Brown, who was known as Ernestine and Teenie, was born and raised on her family's farm in Surry, Va., one of 10 children. She earned a teaching certificate in 1939 from St. Paul's College in Lawrenceville, Va., and began teaching elementary students in Isle of Wight County, Va. In the late 1940s, she moved to Washington and worked for the U.S. Treasury Department, supervising the data entry staff.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 2002
ONE OF AUTUMN'S most beautiful traditions is unfolding on a peaceful hillside in Davidsonville. For eight years, Bill Doepkens has planted a flower mural on the sloping field next to his family's farmhouse. Commuters, children on school buses and people from around the area pass the field every day, watch the chrysanthemums fill the design, and try to identify this year's picture. The Doepkens farm, at Route 424 and U.S. 50, has been an important part of local agriculture since Maryland's Colonial days, when the land was part of the Middle Plantation.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1999
Joel Greer, a private pilot, retired real estate developer and part-time farmer, never thought much about decorating the landscape around his Taneytown farm when he began raising chrysanthemums.But that's what he did.Greer has grown 12,000 chrysanthemums for the past two years along Old Taneytown Road, covering his acre-sized front lawn like a brightly colored quilt."It's absolutely gorgeous," said Jean Masters of Taylorsville, who stopped recently with her husband, Edward, to admire the view and purchase some of the mums.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 19, 1999
ALL SUMMER long, we watched the hillside at the Doepkens farm, waiting and wondering.What surprise had Bill Doepkens concocted this time? For the past five years, Doepkens has spent Memorial Day weekend planting chrysanthemums at his Davidsonville farm.Most of his plants are arranged in long, straight rows. But the hillside next to the intersection of Route 424 and U.S. 50 is unique, because that's where Doepkens creates his annual display of field art, a living mural composed of hundreds and hundreds of chrysanthemums.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 27, 1998
FRIDAY MORNING, I looked out the window and saw frost on the roof. Wouldn't you know it? A frost comes just after we put in the chrysanthemums.The temperature wasn't cold enough to kill the flowers next to the house, so we can enjoy their rich color a little longer. Later in the day, I was happy to see that another planting of chrysanthemums had survived.At Route 424 and U.S. 50 sits the Doepkens Farm. For the past four years, Bill Doepkens has created a chrysanthemum portrait on the hillside next to his farmhouse.
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Staff Writer | November 1, 1992
Indian culture blossoms at Longwood Gardens"Native Americans -- Plants and People" is the theme of the 1992 Chrysanthemum Festival, which opened yesterday at Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, Pa., and continues through Nov. 29.Chrysanthemums -- 15,000 of them in a wide range of color -- will be showcased in a variety of forms throughout Longwood's 4-acre indoor gardens. They provide a backdrop for the American animal topiary created in the forms of a great horned sheep, American bison, red wolf and bald eagle.
FEATURES
By Nancy Brachey and Nancy Brachey,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | September 29, 1996
No matter the season, you see chrysanthemums: white ones in wedding bouquets, pink ones in spring arrangements, yellow ones sharing the limelight with summer's zinnias.But those are florists' flowers, their stems already cut. For the gardener, chrysanthemums are the autumn flower, one of the bright delights of a colorful season.Their rich bronzes, brick reds, golden yellows and mauve pinks clearly say it's fall.Many of you have chrysanthemums in flower beds that will open soon and brighten the scene throughout fall.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1996
Your canary-yellow day lilies are fading and the brilliant purple coneflowers have seen better days, but you don't have to give up the idea of color in your garden just because it's the end of summer. Fall blooms can be every bit as spectacular, particularly if you look beyond the chrysanthemum (although some new varieties of mums come in wonderful lavenders and other unexpected colors).By the beginning of next month, a new crop of bedding plants will start appearing in garden centers. Fall-blooming annuals that you buy and plant during the next few weeks will brighten darkening days well past the first frost.
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