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NEWS
April 6, 2006
Eric Siegel is on assignment. His column will not appear today.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
It took decades before serious documentaries about the civil rights struggle of the 1960s began to appear. But less than a year after some of the biggest victories in the fight for same-sex marriage, a social movement often compared to civil rights, compelling nonfiction films chronicling that history are already starting to arrive. I'm not certain whether such near-instant history will prove to be a good or bad thing, but it's sure to shape the way the fight for marriage equality and gay rights is perceived in future battlegrounds and by future generations.
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FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | April 24, 1992
Its politics are progressive, its readers blue collar, its margin of profit marginal. Anyone who picks up the Baltimore Chronicle knows that this monthly community newspaper has a healthy disregard for the conventions of journalism.For 20 years, the Baltimore Chronicle has been tilting at windmills local and global. From their converted rowhouse on W. Street, editors Alice Cherbonnier and Larry Krause take on the Star Wars missile defense, right-wing regimes in Central America, domestic violence, Operation Desert Storm, illiteracy, health care, public apathy and, on stressful deadline days, each other.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
If you saw a disheveled, clearly despondent 66-year-old man hitchhiking, would you pick him up? Would you pick him up if you realized he was John Waters? Two springs ago, Baltimore's most unrepentant degenerate set out on a mission of discovery. Beginning on Charles Street, not far from his home, Waters would hitchhike all the way to his San Francisco condo, following Interstate 70 most of way. There would be little in the way of advance planning; he'd be relying totally on his thumb and the kindness of strangers.
FEATURES
By Charlie Amter and Charlie Amter,Los Angeles Times | December 28, 2006
STUDIO CITY, CALIF. -- Ed Begley Jr.'s wife, Rachelle Carson, was freezing inside the couple's 1,700-square-foot home last week. "He's like the Marquis de Sade," she said of her energy efficiency-minded husband, who refused to turn on the natural gas despite plunging temperatures inside the Begleys' house. "What about the warmth that I'm sending you right now, honey?" Begley asked. Carson smirked and then embraced her husband. Welcome to life at the Begleys. On Tv A sneak preview of Living With Ed airs at 1 p.m. Monday on HGTV.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2010
Howard Community College, Anne Arundel Community College and University of Maryland, Baltimore County have been named among the best colleges in the nation at which to work, according to a study by the Chronicle of Higher Education. The three local schools were among 97 recognized, having earned a spot in at least one of 12 categories that the national publication used to determine an exceptional college workplace. The Chronicle, which released the results Monday in its third annual report, "The Academic Workplace," said that 43,000 employees (including 20,000 faculty members)
NEWS
Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
Stevenson University had the highest income disparity between its president — who made $1.49 million in 2009 — and rank-and-file professors, according to a salary survey of hundreds of institutions released Monday by The Chronicle of Higher Education. Kevin J. Manning ranked 15th in compensation among the 519 presidents in the survey. Former Johns Hopkins President William J. Brody ranked second on the overall list, receiving $3.8 million, almost all from his retirement package, in his last year on the job. The Chronicle used Manning's salary to illustrate a significant gap between executive compensation and salaries given to most university employees, comparing the situation at the private college to the oft-criticized pay packages for CEOs in corporate America.
SPORTS
February 15, 2007
Reporters will avoid prison time Two San Francisco Chronicle reporters will avoid prison time after a defense lawyer agrees to plead guilty to leaking them secret grand jury documents in the BALCO case. Pg 8D
NEWS
January 12, 1995
Kathleen Tynan, 57, who won widespread acclaim for a biography of her late husband, drama critic Kenneth Tynan, died of cancer Tuesday in London. Her husband, who died in 1980, was London's most influential theater critic and played a major role in shaping British drama. Her 1987 biography, "The Life of Kenneth Tynan," was hailed as the high spot of her literary career. Her other works include the 1975 novel "The Summer Aeroplane" and the screenplay for the 1978 movie "Agatha," which starred Dustin Hoffman and Vanessa Redgrave.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 18, 1994
Randy Shilts, the author of best-selling books on AIDS and gay issues and a newspaper reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle, died yesterday at his home in Guerneville, Calif. He was 42 and also had a home in San Francisco.The cause was AIDS, said Linda Alband, his assistant.Mr. Shilts was one of the first journalists to recognize AIDS as an important national issue. In the early 1980s he persuaded the Chronicle to let him report on AIDS full-time.His work resulted in the widely acclaimed 1987 book "And the Band Played On: Politics, People and the AIDS Epidemic."
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
Ralph Dawson Matthews Jr., a former managing editor of the Baltimore Afro-American who worked closely with Malcolm X in the early 1960s and once shared a house with a young Miles Davis, died April 3 at the Adelphi House assisted living facility in Adelphi, Prince George's County. Mr. Dawson died of complications from chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, or COPD. He was 86. "Ralph was always very inquisitive," remembered Harry Peaker, a retired mathematician who grew up with Mr. Matthews in Northwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 14, 2014
In the history of presidential campaign books, Theodore H. White's "The Making of the President" series in the 1960s set the standard for campaign books to follow. He combined unique access and a sweeping view of the process to help voters judge the candidates and understand the quadrennial exercise as well. Teddy White was a pleasant and avuncular figure who gained that access through a combination of fairness and sympathetic schmoozing. It was once said, disparagingly, that Mr. White was the kind of reporter who could always go back to his sources, meaning he never gave offense to them in what he wrote.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Leo Bretholz, a Holocaust survivor who became a major voice in the campaign to gain reparations from companies that transported victims to concentration camps during World War II, died Saturday in his sleep of unknown causes at his Pikesville home. He was 93. Mr. Bretholz was scheduled to testify Monday in the Maryland House of Delegates on a bill that would require the French railroad company SNCF, which is seeking a $6 billion contract from the state of Maryland to operate the Purple Line, to pay reparations to U.S. Holocaust survivors.
NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | February 24, 2014
Tonight Maryland Public Television will their new documentary "Marvin Mandel: A Complicated Life," taking a look at our 56th governor. I received an advanced copy from MPT and watched it over the weekend and can tell you that it is certainly worth waching.   The piece takes a look at Mandel's rise, from a young man who wanted to be a major league ballplayer, through law school and his selection to be a part of Baltimore's Democratic machine, and then his ascension as governor.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 13, 2014
If you think it's been a long winter here in the Patapsco Drainage Basin, imagine Western Maryland: The first snow landed out there in October; they've had 90 inches so far, with about 2 feet of it held in place by a freeze that has made Deep Creek Lake safe for ice fishing. Of course, winters are almost always like that in Garrett County; it's the snowiest part of Maryland. But I enjoy going over Garrett weather facts now and then for their shock value and for the perspective they provide for my winter-weary and weather-worried neighbors in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
The recent publication of Elmer J. Hall's "A Mill on the Point: One Hundred and Twenty-Five Years of Steelmaking at Sparrows Point, Maryland," marks the last of his quartet of books chronicling the work and social history of the once heavily industrialized eastern Baltimore County peninsula. His earlier books include "Diary of a Mill Town: Recollections of the Bungalows and Sparrows Point, Maryland," "Shipbuilding at the Sparrows Point Yard: A Century of Pride and Tradition," and "The Patapsco and Back Rivers Railroad: Chronicles of the Push, Bump and Ram. " Hall is a retired Baltimore County public school educator and Sparrows Point native who grew up in the Bungalows, the now-demolished company town neighborhood.
NEWS
By Photos by Christopher T. Assaf and Photos by Christopher T. Assaf,Sun photographer | August 6, 2007
They are everywhere. From graduations to art festivals to a regular day in the city. No life event is complete without the long eye of the lens. Some cameras are conspicuous while others only come out of pants pockets and handbags when it's time to chronicle some of life's major milestones. Say "cheese!"
SPORTS
March 8, 2006
Excerpts from a forthcoming book by two San Francisco Chronicle reporters offer more evidence that Barry Bonds used myriad illegal performance-enhancing drugs to further his already impressive career. The book is coming out a year after Jose Canseco's Juiced first implicated Bonds and other major league players. PG 1A
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
William A. Miller Jr., a seasoned newsman and public relations executive who was the first managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education, died Wednesday of heart disease at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 88. "He was a very special person, newspaperman, and a special citizen," said former Sen. Paul A. Sarbanes. "He was always very fair and thorough in his reporting. He was a combination of the outgoing and quiet, if that's possible. He was very warm, friendly and outgoing and not the explosive type," said Mr. Sarbanes.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
In an effort to reach out to some of its "multicultural" riders -- namely those who identify as LGBT, black or Hispanic -- Amtrak has launched three new "microsites" where bloggers will be chronicling travel issues specifically relevant to those communities. The three sites launched earlier this month. For the bilingual Hispanic community, there is the translatable DescubreNorteAmerica.com ; for the black community, there is MyBlackJourney.com ; and for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community, there is AmtrakRideWithPride.com . "While Amtrak's main website, Amtrak.com, is a travel-planning resource for all travelers, the microsites are culturally focused travel sites that host the unique, original multicultural voices of a rotating set of featured bloggers," Amtrak said in a statement.
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