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Chronic Pain

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NEWS
October 12, 2012
Reading your article on health care insurance last month I was struck by how Maryland is attempting to make health care services available to all state residents at an affordable price ("Maryland picks model for essential health insurance benefits," Sept. 27). I was gratified to see that the state government recognizes what a critical issue pain management has become. As workers in a hospital emergency room in a small town in Maryland we see many individuals who experience chronic pain and come to the ER for treatment.
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NEWS
August 13, 2014
We were saddened to read about Baltimore County Police Officer Joseph Stanley Harden's arrest on robbery and drug possession charges ( "Off-duty officer tries to break into home in search of drugs, police say," Aug. 1). The veteran officer reportedly told investigators he became addicted to Oxycodone after a work-related injury. While there is a general awareness of prescription drug abuse in our society, most people do not understand the complicated problem of chronic pain syndrome that can lead to prescription drug dependence or addiction.
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FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | December 29, 1992
Chronic pain, in the absence of any discernible physical cause, is the most common reason for lost workdays in this country, yet doctors remain unsure about what causes the complaint, how to treat it, or even if it exists.What do you do when the scans, blood tests and exams indicate nothing wrong, but the patient is incapacitated?"Its a terrible dilemma," said Dr. Kathleen Foley, director of the pain service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. "Pain is what people say it is. And if you start with the concept that you should believe the patient, then how can you say it is real or unreal, and how do you prove it?"
NEWS
February 6, 2014
This letter is in reply to Dan Rodricks ' column in The Sun, "A long line of heroin deaths, Baltimore to New York" (Feb. 4). In his moving column, Mr. Rodricks bemoans the loss of so many lives, including that of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, to the ravages of chronic heroin addiction. Mr. Rodricks remembers some worthy people who succumbed to this addiction in Baltimore. He is baffled and distressed that addicts are jailed for their malady, rather than hospitalized and treated.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | May 24, 1994
What would we do without pain? You'd pick up a hot frying pan and burn yourself badly if it weren't for an almost instantaneous reflex that makes you drop it. You might walk miles on a sprained ankle doing further damage except for the body's protective signal that says stop.Pain is the body's early warning system that alerts you to anything from appendicitis to a heart attack.Despite its importance, pain can ruin people's lives. You could live with a stuffy nose or stiff joints, but pain gets your attention and can dominate every waking moment.
FEATURES
By Jamie Talan and Jamie Talan,Newsday | January 24, 1995
Take an aspirin and call back in, well, a few years. That's how long it may take for the next generation of painkillers to arrive.But they are coming, and researchers say these new and powerful substances -- born from the most advanced knowledge of how pain messages travel from the periphery to the brain -- will revolutionize pain treatment for chronic conditions such as migraines and arthritis."
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 2003
America is seriously divided about controlling chronic pain, which afflicts more than 50 million people and costs the country $100 billion a year. On the one hand, we grossly under-treat it. Management of chronic pain and the pain of dying patients is arguably the most egregiously neglected field of medicine. On the other hand, as a society, we have become obsessed with the war on drugs - and the fear of addiction to opioids (narcotics). Pain patients who were functioning well on morphine-like drugs such as oxycodone (OxyContin)
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | October 14, 2007
The crash that grounded Linda Berl had nothing to do with the Piper Cherokee that she flew to shuttle needy Eastern Shore patients to local hospitals. What got her was a low-altitude tumble from the front porch of her Delaware home in 2001 that left her with a broken leg and persistent, debilitating pain. "Sometimes I'll feel like my foot is on fire," she said. "It feels very deep, like it's in my bones." The pain dominated Berl's life for years, but now the 47-year-old Smyrna resident hopes to return to flying with the help of a spinal cord stimulator -- a device that Johns Hopkins doctors implanted under the skin of her back to override pain signals traveling from her body to her brain.
NEWS
By Bruce Japsen and Bruce Japsen,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 11, 2005
Despite sweeping new warnings that the nation's most popular painkillers can harm hearts, stomachs and skin, many Americans are going to go right on taking them, saying the relief is worth the risk. The popular arthritis drug Bextra last week became the second Cox-2 painkiller pulled from the market while the Food and Drug Administration pinned its highest warnings on Celebrex and nearly 20 other common prescription-strength drugs such as Mobic, Motrin, Naprosyn and ibuprofen. The move tainted trusted remedies and replaced them with nothing but confusing alternatives, prompting many patients to count pills and ration what's left of medications that have worked for them.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2003
After 10 days of testimony and less than two hours of deliberations, a Baltimore County jury awarded $4 million this week to a 35-year-old woman who said she has suffered chronic pain and partial paralysis since 1998 because a doctor in Fallston General Hospital's emergency room delayed sending her for back surgery. Linda McAlexander, a Harford County resident who worked as a real estate loan processor, had an established diagnosis of lumbar disc disease when she went to the emergency room in June 1998.
NEWS
January 9, 2014
These groups meet regularly. Alzheimer's Caregiver Support Group - Third Wednesday, 5:30 p.m., at Lighthouse Senior Living at Ellicott City, 3100 N. Ridge Road, Ellicott City. 410-465-2288. Bereaved Parents, USA - Third Wednesday, 8 p.m. For parents and siblings who have lost a child or sibling of any age. First Presbyterian Church of Howard County, 9325 Presbyterian Circle, Columbia. 410-321-7053. Breast Cancer Support Group - Third Wednesday, 7-8:30 p.m. Claudia Mayer Cancer Resource Center, 10710 Charter Drive, Suite G050, Columbia.
NEWS
May 7, 2013
Let's Get Organized - "Organizing for the Season," Wed., May 15, 10:30 a.m.-noon, Laurel-Beltsville Senior Activity Center, 7120 Contee Road. Judy Tiger, of Just That Simple, shares tips on putting away winter clothes and organizing for spring and summer. Sign up at registration in center lobby. 301-204-3350. "Power Over Pain" group - Sponsored by SPRING, Senior Peer Resources: Individuals, Networks and Groups, program of Howard County Office on Aging, Wed., May 15, 1-2:30 p.m., North Laurel 50+ Center, 9411 Whiskey Bottom Road.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
Naomi Morgan reached her limit when her doctor recommended a third surgery for chronic back pain. Tired of being cut open only to have the pain return, Morgan, a 65-year-old nursing assistant, began looking for a less invasive and hopefully more effective way to treat her ailment, which she thinks started from lifting patients or moving furniture. She turned to a chiropractor, whom Morgan credits for helping her manage her back pain for the past 21 years with stretching, realignments and other treatments.
NEWS
October 12, 2012
Reading your article on health care insurance last month I was struck by how Maryland is attempting to make health care services available to all state residents at an affordable price ("Maryland picks model for essential health insurance benefits," Sept. 27). I was gratified to see that the state government recognizes what a critical issue pain management has become. As workers in a hospital emergency room in a small town in Maryland we see many individuals who experience chronic pain and come to the ER for treatment.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 22, 2012
A new survey of integrative medicine centers shows that the most commonly treated ailments are chronic pain, gastrointestinal conditions, depression and anxiety, cancer and chronic stress. The survey was conducted at 29 centers, including the University of Maryland Center for Integrative Medicine , by the Bravewell Collaborative , a nonprofit foundation that advocates for and researches integrative medicine. This kind of medicine purports to treat the whole patient - physically, emotionally, spiritually, etc. -- through use of alternative and complementary therapies such as acupuncture and massage.
NEWS
August 2, 2001
OXYCONTIN is a remarkable prescription drug that has made life bear- able for millions of cancer patients and others with severe chronic pain. It's also a synthetic opiate that is one of the most widely abused and deadliest street drugs, linked to hundreds of deaths and a spreading wave of addict crime. In a rare step against a single medication, the Drug Enforcement Agency is cracking down with a plan to limit distribution to physicians. More than 6.5 million prescriptions were written for the drug last year, many for "nonmedical" reasons, the DEA warns.
NEWS
September 5, 2008
The June letter from the Baltimore Health Department alerted physicians, nurses and other providers to a significant increase in methadone-related overdose deaths. The letter from Dr. Laura Herrera, a deputy city health commissioner, raised the possibility that the overdoses involved prescriptions for pain. It was a cautionary reminder that health care providers should educate their patients about the proper use of methadone and the lethal risks of taking extra doses. Dr. Herrera was right to be concerned: Methadone-overdose deaths of city residents have risen from seven in 1995 to 74 in 2007.
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