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Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

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HEALTH
February 8, 2010
Fatigue is a common complaint of people who are not sleeping well or who are stressed, but severe or clinical fatigue may leave a person with generalized weakness and make it hard for him to initiate or maintain activity. People may also have difficulty with concentration, memory and emotional stability. Dr. Jamal Mikdashi, a rheumatologist at the University of Maryland Medical Center and an associate professor of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, explains how to tell whether a person might have chronic fatigue syndrome.
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NEWS
June 29, 2011
Dan Rodricks has twice written columns suggesting chronic Lyme disease does not exist ("MPT's flawed decision on flawed film," June 19). I represent just one of thousands of men, women, and children who have had their lives, careers and finances lost and torn apart because of incorrect information the Infectious Diseases Society of America is giving to physicians about Lyme disease. In 1993, I was misdiagnosed by a physician as having chronic fatigue syndrome. Each year I got worse even though I pushed myself to continue working.
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NEWS
By McClatchy News Service | November 19, 1990
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- San Francisco researchers have devised a laboratory test to distinguish chronic fatigue syndrome from garden-variety fatigue.Their discovery, announced yesterday at a national conference on fatigue, might provide the laboratory evidence physicians need to diagnose the debilitating disease, which is thought to afflict 3 to 5 million Americans.Because it's characterized by often misleading symptoms that mimic everything from mononucleosis to multiple sclerosis, the disease has been difficult to pinpoint.
NEWS
February 8, 2010
Fatigue is a common complaint of people who are not sleeping well or who are stressed, but severe or clinical fatigue may leave a person with generalized weakness and make it hard for him to initiate or maintain activity. People may also have difficulty with concentration, memory and emotional stability. Dr. Jamal Mikdashi, a rheumatologist at the University of Maryland Medical Center and an associate professor of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, explains how to tell whether a person might have chronic fatigue syndrome.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 9, 2005
For years, many doctors and others dismissed people with chronic fatigue syndrome, or CFS, as depressed, lazy or just plain whiny. Now, a slew of research - more than 2,000 scientific papers by some counts - is suggesting that chronic fatigue is not a psychiatric illness, but a nasty mix of immunological, neurological and hormonal abnormalities. Several types of brain scans, for instance, have shown irregularities - such as different patterns of blood flow to certain regions of the brain - in patients with chronic fatigue, while other studies have shown that patients with the syndrome may have difficulty thinking and processing information and be unable to do several mental tasks at once.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | November 19, 1990
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Medical researchers are finding increasing evidence that chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), which causes persistent weakness and fatigue, is caused by an overactive immune system that exhausts the patient by refusing to slow down.Normally the immune system returns to a vigilant but dormant state after an infection is stopped, but for unknown reasons, the immune systems of CFS patients seem to keep on going long after the infection is gone, leaving them exhausted, with fevers, sore throats, muscle pain, memory and concentration problems and other symptoms.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1997
WASHINGTON - Elaine Showalter is pursued by tired people.She began to suspect she had a serious problem after an appearance on a Washington television station. A doctor she had debated on an interview show caught her on the way out, told her she hoped her life would be ruined, her career wrecked, then added: "We're going to rip you to shreds."The physician had come on the show to argue the medical validity of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome -- which is to say, that it has a biological cause. One of the points of Showalter's new book, "Hystories," is that it doesn't, that it is a form of hysteria.
NEWS
June 29, 2011
Dan Rodricks has twice written columns suggesting chronic Lyme disease does not exist ("MPT's flawed decision on flawed film," June 19). I represent just one of thousands of men, women, and children who have had their lives, careers and finances lost and torn apart because of incorrect information the Infectious Diseases Society of America is giving to physicians about Lyme disease. In 1993, I was misdiagnosed by a physician as having chronic fatigue syndrome. Each year I got worse even though I pushed myself to continue working.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | January 15, 1992
The largest in-depth study of people with chronic fatigue syndrome has established that the great majority have brain damage and evidence of active infection by a common virus.The long-awaited report, to be published today, strongly supports the contention by some doctors and thousands of patients that the disorder often has physical causes rather than only psychological ones.The study focused on the original cluster of chronic fatigue patients in the Lake Tahoe region of Northern California and Nevada who first brought the disorder to public and scientific attention in 1985.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2000
An insurance company is demanding that former bank executive Charles W. Cole Jr. return $842,276 in disability benefits and unpaid premiums, claiming that he is healthy enough to work full time and mountain-climb in New Hampshire. Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co. filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Baltimore against Cole, 64, who retired as chief executive of First National Bank of Maryland in 1994. Cole has been chairman and chief executive officer of Legg Mason Trust Co. in Baltimore since the summer.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 9, 2005
For years, many doctors and others dismissed people with chronic fatigue syndrome, or CFS, as depressed, lazy or just plain whiny. Now, a slew of research - more than 2,000 scientific papers by some counts - is suggesting that chronic fatigue is not a psychiatric illness, but a nasty mix of immunological, neurological and hormonal abnormalities. Several types of brain scans, for instance, have shown irregularities - such as different patterns of blood flow to certain regions of the brain - in patients with chronic fatigue, while other studies have shown that patients with the syndrome may have difficulty thinking and processing information and be unable to do several mental tasks at once.
NEWS
December 26, 2001
Other ailing veterans of the Gulf War also deserve compensation The Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) decision to compensate 40 Gulf War veterans its researchers have found with Lou Gehrig's disease (ALS), without waiting for peer review or publication of the study involved, is commendable. But this is not the first disease to be statistically linked with service in the Gulf War, as The Sun mistakenly reported ("ALS, gulf war link piques scientists' interest," Dec. 12). Many government researchers, including the VA's Deputy Undersecretary for Health, Dr. Frances M. Murphy, have published papers since 1999 documenting similar and even greater increases among Gulf War veterans in chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, multiple chemical sensitivity and their symptoms.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2000
An insurance company is demanding that former bank executive Charles W. Cole Jr. return $842,276 in disability benefits and unpaid premiums, claiming that he is healthy enough to work full time and mountain-climb in New Hampshire. Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co. filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Baltimore against Cole, 64, who retired as chief executive of First National Bank of Maryland in 1994. Cole has been chairman and chief executive officer of Legg Mason Trust Co. in Baltimore since the summer.
NEWS
October 14, 1999
In WashingtonInvitations mailed for Buchanan switch to Reform PartyRepublican presidential candidate Patrick J. Buchanan is preparing to bolt his party this month and begin a quest for the Reform Party nomination, officials close to the conservative commentator said yesterday.Buchanan's campaign mailed invitations to supporters yesterday inviting them to a "major announcement" Oct. 25 at a Falls Church, Va., hotel, the officials said. His advisers expect him to announce his Reform Party candidacy at that time, the officials said.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1998
Anita Nall had just turned 16 when she won three swimming medals at the 1992 Olympics in Barcelona, Spain. Two years later, she was found to have chronic fatigue syndrome, and her career came to a halt. Now, she is back in the pool and in the early stages of a comeback she hopes will take her to the 2000 Olympics in Australia."I do have hopes of making it," Nall said. "But it's hard for me to think that far ahead. It's two years. It's early for me to say that, but at the same time I have to begin work now to make it."
NEWS
October 28, 1997
Fatigue syndrome isn't a joking matterI read the ''Kudzu'' comic in the Oct. 17 Sun, which used chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in a mock-weather report. Not only does this comic lack humor, it is cruel.As the largest and most active organization dedicated to conquering chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) or chronic fatigue and immune dysfunction syndrome (CFIDS), we feel compelled to respond to this comic. Public knowledge of CFIDS is growing, yet remains painfully limited. CFIDS patients have endured a great deal of skepticism and misunderstanding regarding the illness.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate | December 10, 1991
Q: I've been feeling too tired to exercise. My doctor thinks I have chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). What can you tell me about it?A: Doctors sometimes cannot find a valid reason for unexplained weakness and tiredness. In some cases, a patient is depressed. Depression saps drive and strength. For others, doctors will conduct extensive tests, often finding nothing -- no anemia, no diagnosable infection such as mononucleosis, no mineral deficiency, no hidden cancer and no low-thyroid function.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1997
WASHINGTON - Elaine Showalter is pursued by tired people.She began to suspect she had a serious problem after an appearance on a Washington television station. A doctor she had debated on an interview show caught her on the way out, told her she hoped her life would be ruined, her career wrecked, then added: "We're going to rip you to shreds."The physician had come on the show to argue the medical validity of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome -- which is to say, that it has a biological cause. One of the points of Showalter's new book, "Hystories," is that it doesn't, that it is a form of hysteria.
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