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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2011
If Phillip Tharrington hadn't been caught attempting to rob a Rockville store in 2005, he might never have gotten treatment for an HIV infection he had ignored for years. The 47-year-old said he was persuaded to get care after being sent to the Maryland Correctional Institution in Hagerstown, where officials have been striving to identify and treat the disproportionate number of prisoners who arrive with chronic conditions such as HIV and hepatitis-C infections and diabetes. State data suggest there are now more healthy prisoners like Tharrington among the 26,000 incarcerated in Maryland facilities — and that's good public policy, officials say. More diseases are being controlled and fewer costly hospital trips are needed, making the system more efficient.
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HEALTH
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has been awarded a $3.5 million federal grant to invest in diabetes and heart disease prevention efforts in five designated regions in the state, including Baltimore. The award is one of 21 grants totaling $69.5 million and issued to city and state health departments across the country by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, under an initiative "to support public health efforts to reduce chronic diseases, promote healthier lifestyles, reduce health disparities, and control health care spending," DHMH said Thursday.
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FEATURES
By Alyssa Gabbay and Alyssa Gabbay,Contributing Writer | February 18, 1992
It has been splashed across the covers of national magazines and featured on popular television shows such as "The Golden Girls." Celebrities such as Cher are reputed to have it, as are more than 100,000 lesser known Americans.But despite its high profile, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) -- an illness primarily characterized by profound lethargy -- remains a mystery to the medical community. No cause or cure has been identified, and until recently, laboratory tests uncovered few abnormalities in patients, leading some physicians to claim that the illness is psychological.
NEWS
By Jonathon Rondeau | September 4, 2014
Throughout the Baltimore City school year, student success will be measured in the traditional ways, through test scores and grades, and, for high school seniors, by whether or not they graduate. While tracking such standards is vital to understanding student achievement and progress as well as the success of our school system as a whole, another key indicator deserves far more focused attention: attendance. For students to succeed in school, they have to be in school. And not enough of Baltimore City students are attending school as much as they should.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1995
Chronic fatigue syndrome is often the result of a common blood-pressure abnormality -- not a psychiatric problem or a tendency to fake symptoms, doctors at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine said yesterday.Physicians who studied 23 fatigued adults said all but one suffered from fainting spells and periods of light-headedness -- the same condition that strikes many people after standing on their feet for long periods on a hot day.Even more intriguing, most felt more alert and energetic when they took medications and ate foods that raised blood pressure.
TOPIC
By Benedict Carey and Benedict Carey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 2003
The world's con artists and hustlers and philanderers have to lie - it's how they get by. But the real masters of lying don't need a clear reason. They spin war stories for neighbors, travel adventures for co-workers, romantic fictions for friends. That's why many psychiatrists consider chronic lying as almost always a symptom of a deeper emotional problem, such as delusional thinking, psychopathy or narcissism. Yet the most provocative new research suggests that people lie chronically for a wide variety of reasons, some serious, others relatively benign.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1998
Anita Nall had just turned 16 when she won three swimming medals at the 1992 Olympics in Barcelona, Spain. Two years later, she was found to have chronic fatigue syndrome, and her career came to a halt. Now, she is back in the pool and in the early stages of a comeback she hopes will take her to the 2000 Olympics in Australia."I do have hopes of making it," Nall said. "But it's hard for me to think that far ahead. It's two years. It's early for me to say that, but at the same time I have to begin work now to make it."
FEATURES
October 8, 1990
THERE ARE several organizations offering information and support to victims of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Locally, Esther Rodman operates a CFS hot line (358-1203) and heads a support group that meets periodically at Baltimore County General Hospital.In addition, the GBMC Women's Resource Center (828-3301) offers a packet of written information on Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.Nationally, the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta offers extensive recorded information. Call 1-404-332-4555. Or send a self-adressed, stamped envelope to Chronic Fatigue and Immune Dysfunction Syndrome Association, P.O. Box 220398, Charlotte, N.C. 28222-0398.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2010
Many women of child-bearing years feel pain in their pelvic area and don't know what it is. It gets worse as the day goes on, and with each pregnancy. Their doctors also sometimes can't determine the cause. Dr. Kelvin Hong, an assistant professor of radiology and surgery at the Johns Hopkins University's School of Medicine, said it could be pelvic congestion syndrome. And it could get worse over time. Question: What is pelvic congestion syndrome (PCS)? Answer: According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, pelvic congestion syndrome is one of the recognized causes of chronic pelvic pain.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
Our muscles and organs are divided into compartments held together by connective tissue. Damage to the compartments can cause a condition called compartment syndrome, which can cause painful swelling. Dr. Daryl Osbahr, an orthopedic surgeon at Union Memorial Hospital, said if the condition isn't treated soon enough, it can cause long-term damage. What is compartment syndrome and what causes it? Compartment syndrome occurs when an insufficient amount of blood is distributed to other structures within that compartment or enclosed space resulting in a lack of oxygen and nutrients within that area of the body, including the arm, leg, or any other enclosed space.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 6, 2014
Top Maryland officials highlighted a change in the way hospitals are charging patients for treatment - and a related push to prevent unnecessary admissions -- during a stop Wednesday in Western Maryland. Maryland has long regulated hospital rates under a unique agreement with federal officials, but has altered its waiver in a way that provides hospitals with a budget based on their projected patient population rather than a fee for every service performed. The idea is to cut costs and improve care by encouraging more preventive measures.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Dr. Jay N. Karpa, a retired Baltimore surgeon who was also certified in chronic wound care, died Friday of prostate cancer at his Pikesville home. He was 79. "As a person, he was a true gentleman. He was kind and compassionate and treated his patients like they were his family," said Dr. Alan S. Davis, who is chairman of the department of surgery at Northwest Hospital in Randallstown. "And he was a superb surgeon and was always cool and calm in the OR. " The son of Isador Karpa, a pharmacist, and Dora Karpa, a homemaker, Jay Norman Karpa was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park.
NEWS
April 29, 2014
The horrifying statistics on rape and sexual assault on college campuses in this country speak for themselves. Studies show that about one in five undergraduate women has experienced such an attack or an attempted attack at some point during their college years, but only 12 percent of incidents are reported. Why is justice so difficult to find in what is supposed to be a protected and enlightened atmosphere of a college or university? Advocates say there are numerous institutional barriers that discourage reporting, including administrators who treat reports of sexual assault with disbelief and on-campus judicial systems that are difficult for a victim to navigate.
NEWS
By Cory Booker | April 23, 2014
This year, approximately 60,000 Americans will be diagnosed with Parkinson's, joining the 1 million people already living with the disease in the United States and the 4 million to 6 million diagnosed with it worldwide. Their painful struggle is one that I know all too well. I remember when my dad first had symptoms of Parkinson's, a motor system disorder that results from the loss of certain brain cells. For him, it started with a persistent numbness in his arm and hand that led to a decades-long battle with the ever-increasing symptoms that eventually took his life in 2013.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and By Erica L. Green | March 24, 2014
A Baltimore city councilwoman is calling on school system leaders to reconsider using a disciplinary tool against more than one-third of principals in order to improve student attendance, saying it takes an entire community to get students to school. Mary Pat Clarke, head of the council's education committee, introduced a resolution Monday that requests more information about the school system's attendance issues and the rationale behind a recent plan that has 61 principals facing pressure to improve attendance in the last few months of the school year.
NEWS
September 29, 2013
A few years ago, Franklin Square Elementary/Middle School Principal Terry Patton was trying to figure out how to get more of her students to attend school regularly when she hit on a novel idea: Get a washing machine and dryer. From talking to her students and their parents, she had learned that many children didn't come to school every day because they were ashamed of wearing dirty uniforms, and their families don't have laundry facilities at home. So Ms. Patton got a non-profit group to donate a washer-dryer to the school and told her students they could use it. Soon, children who had been skipping school two or three days a month started showing up regularly for class.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
Women who find themselves having a hard time getting pregnant may have endometriosis to blame. The condition is one of the most common causes of infertility. Dr. Michael A. Giudice, a physician of obstetrics and gynecology with University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, explains what causes the condition and how to treat it. What is endometriosis? Endometriosis is a chronic gynecologic disorder that causes infertility and pelvic pain. It occurs in 6 to 10 percent of women of reproductive age, but in up to 50 percent in women with infertility and 80 percent of women with chronic pelvic pain.
NEWS
By SHARI ROAN | January 13, 2006
His ordeal began 24 years ago with an upper respiratory infection. That was when George Gharabeigie began to cough. And cough and cough. "At first it was sporadic," says the 59-year-old man from Irvine, Calif. "But then any time I ate ice cream or had a can of soda, I had uncontrollable coughing. If I had a cold, I would cough and cough. Sometimes it was so bad that, at the end of the day, I had a headache and my chest muscles were sore and ached." Over the years, Gharabeigie saw dozens of doctors about his hacking.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
Women who find themselves having a hard time getting pregnant may have endometriosis to blame. The condition is one of the most common causes of infertility. Dr. Michael A. Giudice, a physician of obstetrics and gynecology with University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, explains what causes the condition and how to treat it. What is endometriosis? Endometriosis is a chronic gynecologic disorder that causes infertility and pelvic pain. It occurs in 6 to 10 percent of women of reproductive age, but in up to 50 percent in women with infertility and 80 percent of women with chronic pelvic pain.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
Our muscles and organs are divided into compartments held together by connective tissue. Damage to the compartments can cause a condition called compartment syndrome, which can cause painful swelling. Dr. Daryl Osbahr, an orthopedic surgeon at Union Memorial Hospital, said if the condition isn't treated soon enough, it can cause long-term damage. What is compartment syndrome and what causes it? Compartment syndrome occurs when an insufficient amount of blood is distributed to other structures within that compartment or enclosed space resulting in a lack of oxygen and nutrients within that area of the body, including the arm, leg, or any other enclosed space.
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