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By Nicholas Wade and Nicholas Wade,New York Times News Service | October 8, 1999
Biologists must have gazed thousands of times through microscopes at the 46 chromosomes that lie in the nucleus of every normal human cell without perceiving what has now been discovered: the ends of the chromosomes - the immensely long molecules of DNA that carry the genetic information - are neatly tied in large, firmly knotted loops.The discovery bears on a long- puzzle, that of why the cell does not mistake the ends of intact chromosomes for the broken ends of cut chromosomes. A broken chromosome end sends the cell into full panic mode: If it cannot repair the broken end it will trigger its self-destruct mechanism and die for the common good rather than risk the genetic instability that leads to cancer.
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FEATURES
October 18, 2007
Dr. Matt Narrett of Ellicott City has been named executive vice president and chief medical officer of Erickson Retirement Communities, a geriatric health care company based in Baltimore. Dr. Roy Thomas Smoot Jr. has joined Maryland General Hospital as chief medical officer. Smoot is a fellow in the American College of Surgeons. Dr. Carol Greider, professor and director of molecular biology and genetics in the Johns Hopkins Institute of Basic Biomedical Sciences, has been awarded the 2007 Horwitz Prize along with two other researchers.
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NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 26, 1999
PHILADELPHIA -- Scientists at Scotland's Roslin Institute, the laboratory famous for cloning Dolly the sheep, have come out with this new finding just in time for the Thanksgiving weekend: We're more like turkeys than previously believed.The similarity -- identified specifically in chickens but present in turkeys and all other birds -- is in the way that genes are arranged on the chromosomes."We find that the human is more like the chicken than the human is like the mouse," said lead researcher David Burt, whose paper appeared in yesterday's issue of the journal Nature.
NEWS
By Bryn Nelson and Bryn Nelson,Newsday | February 9, 2007
Scientists have assembled the genetic blueprint of a thoroughbred mare, a rough draft of its entire DNA sequence that may point the way toward a better understanding of equine evolution, physiology and the dozens of diseases found in both horses and humans. Claire Wade, a lead member of the sequencing team and a senior research scientist at the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Mass., said the assembled genome still contains sizable gaps and has not been thoroughly analyzed. Nevertheless, she and other researchers said its estimated 2.7 billion units, or letters, of DNA should provide a wealth of new information.
NEWS
By William O. Beeman | March 17, 1996
ARE THE CATEGORIES "man" and "woman" so obviously clear that they need no further explanation?Legislators throughout the nation trying to prevent the recognition of "gay marriage" contracted in other states obviously think so. They have introduced legislation that would grant official recognition only to marriages between "a man and a woman." Legislation embodying this language has already passed in South Dakota and Utah and may become law in 17 other states, including Maryland, in the next few months.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 10, 2006
They are never considered cute or cuddly, but Tasmanian devils are a cultural icon of Australia, right behind koalas and kangaroos. Over the last decade, devils have been dying off in large numbers, felled by oral and facial tumors that prevent their eating, causing them to starve to death. In some areas, virtually all of the animals have died. A study published in the journal Nature by researchers at Tasmania's Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment offers this possible explanation: The animals are inadvertently transplanting tumor cells among themselves when they bite during fights and mating rituals.
FEATURES
October 18, 2007
Dr. Matt Narrett of Ellicott City has been named executive vice president and chief medical officer of Erickson Retirement Communities, a geriatric health care company based in Baltimore. Dr. Roy Thomas Smoot Jr. has joined Maryland General Hospital as chief medical officer. Smoot is a fellow in the American College of Surgeons. Dr. Carol Greider, professor and director of molecular biology and genetics in the Johns Hopkins Institute of Basic Biomedical Sciences, has been awarded the 2007 Horwitz Prize along with two other researchers.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 23, 1992
Researchers are close to identifying the gene responsible for an inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that strikes unusually early, typically at about age 45.The discovery should provide strong new clues about the development of Alzheimer's, which afflicts as many as 4 million Americans, most of them over the age of 65.The new gene, whose approximate location is to be reported today in the journal Science by a team from the University of Washington, is...
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | May 26, 2006
Barry Bonds is on the verge of passing Babe Ruth in career home runs, and he will then take aim at one of sport's most hallowed records. Lying in the crossfire is all that is sacred. From the press box to the bleachers, the amateur ethicists are all screaming about historical injustice, yet no one is taking any actual action. Something must be done, and it's pretty clear what: Time for Hank Aaron to make a comeback. The idea sounds silly, right? Like a bad Disney movie? But you've got to remember that the face of sports is constantly under the knife of a plastic surgeon.
NEWS
By Bryn Nelson and Bryn Nelson,Newsday | February 9, 2007
Scientists have assembled the genetic blueprint of a thoroughbred mare, a rough draft of its entire DNA sequence that may point the way toward a better understanding of equine evolution, physiology and the dozens of diseases found in both horses and humans. Claire Wade, a lead member of the sequencing team and a senior research scientist at the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Mass., said the assembled genome still contains sizable gaps and has not been thoroughly analyzed. Nevertheless, she and other researchers said its estimated 2.7 billion units, or letters, of DNA should provide a wealth of new information.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | May 26, 2006
Barry Bonds is on the verge of passing Babe Ruth in career home runs, and he will then take aim at one of sport's most hallowed records. Lying in the crossfire is all that is sacred. From the press box to the bleachers, the amateur ethicists are all screaming about historical injustice, yet no one is taking any actual action. Something must be done, and it's pretty clear what: Time for Hank Aaron to make a comeback. The idea sounds silly, right? Like a bad Disney movie? But you've got to remember that the face of sports is constantly under the knife of a plastic surgeon.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 10, 2006
They are never considered cute or cuddly, but Tasmanian devils are a cultural icon of Australia, right behind koalas and kangaroos. Over the last decade, devils have been dying off in large numbers, felled by oral and facial tumors that prevent their eating, causing them to starve to death. In some areas, virtually all of the animals have died. A study published in the journal Nature by researchers at Tasmania's Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment offers this possible explanation: The animals are inadvertently transplanting tumor cells among themselves when they bite during fights and mating rituals.
NEWS
By Peter Gorner and Peter Gorner,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 17, 2005
CHICAGO - An international team of researchers announced yesterday that they have cataloged all the genes on the female X chromosome, a technical feat expected to enable fresh insights into women's health as well as adding a genetic component to the debate over differences between the sexes. Described by the head of the Human Genome Project as "a monumental achievement for biology and medicine," the genetic map should help scientists better understand more than 300 X-linked diseases - such as hemophilia, fragile X syndrome and Duchenne muscular dystrophy - that mothers unwittingly pass on to their sons.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2003
Denise Parker was worried: Her infant daughter wasn't rolling her body over the way her older brothers had. Rebecca's tiny eyes were always crossing - and she seemed floppier than Michael or Andrew. Was something wrong? Wait until her first birthday, she recalls the pediatrician saying. Be patient. When the milestone arrived, Rebecca was still having trouble picking up Cheerios. Her eyes crossed whenever she tried to eat. She was far too quiet. And as more time passed, she didn't walk - or talk.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 23, 2003
Why, oh why, all the fuss over Y? Last week, scientists announced that they had decoded the Y chromosome, the biological maker of males and a generally much maligned chap in the world of genetics. "It is truly the Rodney Dangerfield of chromosomes," declared David Page of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, who played a leading role in the research. The jabs aren't totally undeserved. Besides being the puniest of the 23 human chromosomes, the Y contributes the fewest genes: just 78 of the estimated 30,000 in human DNA. Nor does the Y do all that much biologically - besides turning a woman's egg into a mama's boy. In fact, more than two-thirds of the Y's genes concern the testes, a finding, some scientists joked, that doesn't surprise many psychologists or wives.
NEWS
By Robert Lee Hotz and Robert Lee Hotz,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2003
In scientific circles, the Y chromosome - the essence of masculinity - is scorned as the runt of the human genetic family, so henpecked by mutations and bullied by the tight-knit gang of the inner cell that it is wasting away. So little respect does this small, self-absorbed chromosome command that scientists investigating the human genome felt free to jeer or ignore it - until now. In research made public yesterday, scientists confessed they have sorely misjudged this single-minded sex specialist.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 5, 2001
After suffering a stroke in 1993, Carletha McGriff attempted to walk but would fall every couple of steps. "The message from the brain wasn't going down the spinal column," said McGriff, 45. A growth on her spinal column caused the stroke, resulting in paralysis and her using a wheelchair. She worked through rehabilitation while living in North Carolina, having to adapt to being the patient after once being a nurse's aide. After moving to Maryland in 1997, she took computer courses at Howard Community College and last year was hired as a special events coordinator for the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | September 26, 1999
SO I WAS AT THIS party and I wound up at a table where three attractive single women were complaining about -- surprise! -- men. Specifically, they were complaining about the pickup lines that had been used on them in a bar a few nights earlier.One woman said: "This guy comes up to me and says, 'Are you a teacher?' I mean, is that supposed to be romantic?"All three women rolled all six of their eyes.Another one of them said: "This guy says to me, 'I've been looking at you all night!' So I go, 'Hel-lo, we just got here.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 5, 2001
After suffering a stroke in 1993, Carletha McGriff attempted to walk but would fall every couple of steps. "The message from the brain wasn't going down the spinal column," said McGriff, 45. A growth on her spinal column caused the stroke, resulting in paralysis and her using a wheelchair. She worked through rehabilitation while living in North Carolina, having to adapt to being the patient after once being a nurse's aide. After moving to Maryland in 1997, she took computer courses at Howard Community College and last year was hired as a special events coordinator for the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 26, 1999
PHILADELPHIA -- Scientists at Scotland's Roslin Institute, the laboratory famous for cloning Dolly the sheep, have come out with this new finding just in time for the Thanksgiving weekend: We're more like turkeys than previously believed.The similarity -- identified specifically in chickens but present in turkeys and all other birds -- is in the way that genes are arranged on the chromosomes."We find that the human is more like the chicken than the human is like the mouse," said lead researcher David Burt, whose paper appeared in yesterday's issue of the journal Nature.
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