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October 28, 2013
We read with interest Rebbecca Ruggles' commentary on Fells Point residents' concern regarding the presence of chromium 6 contamination near the site of the proposed Harbor Point project ( "The toll of development," Oct. 25). Residents are rightly concerned because chromium 6 is a highly carcinogenic metal. However, there is another Baltimore-area community where residents are also concerned about chromium 6 as a result of waste from Allied Chemical having been deposited in their midst.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2014
Ana Rule stepped onto a balcony outside the Inn at the Black Olive Sunday morning to check the first results of an unusual air-monitoring effort - one intended to make sure official monitoring across the street is accurate. The hotel in Baltimore's Fells Point overlooks Harbor Point, the planned $1.8 billion mixed-use development on land where a factory once processed chromium. Contaminated soil - capped years ago to keep the toxic chemicals under control - would be temporarily exposed during the early part of the work there.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2013
Even as some Fells Point residents worry that building over a capped toxic site at Harbor Point could endanger their health, records show elevated levels of cancer-causing chromium in groundwater just beyond the area targeted for an upscale development. Some experts have expressed concern about the pollution - especially in light of a developer's plan to disturb the protective cap over land that once held a chromium processing plant. They're also worried that uncontrolled chromium in groundwater beyond Harbor Point could seep into the harbor or pose risks for development of neighboring properties.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 14, 2013
A public meeting tonight (Thursday) will give city residents a chance to ask questions about environmental safeguards for developing Harbor Point, a former factory site in Fells Point where toxic chromium remains entombed underground. The meeting , arranged by Councilman James B. Kraft, is to be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the Morgan Stanley building at 1300 Thames St. The session, postponed from last month because of the federal government shutdown, will cover plans by Beatty Development Group to build a 22-story tower on the site of the former Allied chromium processing plant.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 24, 2006
As federal regulators are poised to announce a new standard for protecting workers, a team of scientists reported yesterday that the chromium industry and its consulting scientists withheld and skewed data that suggests workers exposed to low levels of chromium are dying of lung cancer. David Michaels, a professor of environmental and occupational science at George Washington University, and two other researchers detailed what they called an orchestrated campaign by the chromium industry to manipulate scientific data to persuade the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to weaken a proposed workplace standard.
NEWS
July 23, 1992
The state Board of Public Works has approved spending $1.6 million to haul dirt contaminated with toxic chromium from the Dundalk Marine Terminal.The board awarded a contract yesterday to Continental Vanguard of Bellmawr, N.J., to treat the terminal's hazardous soil and dispose of it in Michigan.About 3,000 cubic yards of chromium-contaminated dirt are stored illegally at the 570-acre terminal.The Maryland Port Administration, which runs the terminal, lacks state permits to store hazardous waste, and so is required to have it hauled away for disposal by a licensed contractor.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1996
A little-known Baltimore Quaker geologist, whose passion for some greenish-black rocks off the Falls Road enabled him to become the founder of the American chromium industry, is being inducted into the National Mining Hall of Fame tomorrow. The belated honors go to Isaac Tyson Jr., whose bronze plaque calls him the "Renaissance man of the early U.S. minerals and chemical industries.""The mining industry is so dominated by the West, it is unusual for an Easterner to get some recognition," said Harald B. (Johnny)
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | November 5, 2012
There's hardly a square inch of the 1,900-acre Soldiers Delight Natural Environmental Area that Johnny Johnsson hasn't walked, mapped or studied. That includes the scant remnants of several 19th-century chromium mines at Soldiers Delight in Owings Mills. Some of these mines once reached as deep as 200 feet beneath this chromium-bearing geological anomaly, known as a "serpentine barren. " Johnsson, a Finksburg resident who is an environmental engineer by profession - and a mining historian by avocation - has been a volunteer ranger and tour guide at Soldiers Delight, which is part of the Patapsco Valley State Park system, since 1990.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | June 19, 1991
Demolition of the chromium-contaminated Allied Chemical Corp. buildings near Fells Point is almost half completed.Allied-Signal Inc., the New Jersey-based owner of Maryland's biggest hazardous waste cleanup site, said that it expects all of the buildings to be torn down by next year and the $70 million cleanup to be finished by 1995.John A. Turner, a spokesman for Allied, said Friday that it will take a crew of about 100 space-suited workers at least another year to dismantle the remaining parts of the chromium factory.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2004
While the former Allied chrome factory in Baltimore churned out chemicals that made hubcaps gleam and fireworks sparkle, it also dumped more than a million cubic yards of potentially cancer-causing chrome waste into and around the harbor. After the plant closed in 1985, the owner of the property paid $100 million to seal the site. Now its new owner wants the federal government this week to remove chromium from a list of pollutants that cause problems in the harbor. Environmentalists oppose the move, saying the harbor remains badly polluted and that making the change would weaken protections for Baltimore Harbor and the Patapsco River, which flows into the Chesapeake Bay. "The state should be doing something to clean up Baltimore Harbor.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
The developer planning to build a new waterfront headquarters for Exelon Corp. on the site of a former chromium-processing plant assured Fells Point-area residents Thursday night that the Harbor Point project could be built safely without releasing the highly contaminated soil and groundwater entombed beneath the site. Speaking to about 100 people gathered at the Morgan Stanley brokerage building at Harbor Point, representatives of Beatty Development Group outlined steps they would take to prevent hazardous dust from being kicked up when crews excavate through the clean soil and plastic capping the contamination and drive 1,100 pilings into the ground.
NEWS
November 5, 2013
In regard to the article, "Environment agencies delay Harbor Point work" (Nov. 1), Can you say cover-up? Can you say shady? Isn't it strange that the chromium readings are high in the area of Harbor Point? Has no one or no agency been monitoring the area from the early days of the original capping till now? Maybe it has been high all along and it just was not known or made common knowledge. Good thing to check on The Sun's part. Who did the last round of testing, and more importantly, who will do the next one?
NEWS
October 28, 2013
We read with interest Rebbecca Ruggles' commentary on Fells Point residents' concern regarding the presence of chromium 6 contamination near the site of the proposed Harbor Point project ( "The toll of development," Oct. 25). Residents are rightly concerned because chromium 6 is a highly carcinogenic metal. However, there is another Baltimore-area community where residents are also concerned about chromium 6 as a result of waste from Allied Chemical having been deposited in their midst.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2013
Even as some Fells Point residents worry that building over a capped toxic site at Harbor Point could endanger their health, records show elevated levels of cancer-causing chromium in groundwater just beyond the area targeted for an upscale development. Some experts have expressed concern about the pollution - especially in light of a developer's plan to disturb the protective cap over land that once held a chromium processing plant. They're also worried that uncontrolled chromium in groundwater beyond Harbor Point could seep into the harbor or pose risks for development of neighboring properties.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
Plans for developing a former Baltimore chemical plant now known as Harbor Point will be aired Wednesday as the developer and government regulators explain safeguards planned to prevent release of contaminated soil and ground water beneath the site. An "open house" meeting is scheduled from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Morgan Stanley building, 1300 Thames Street. Representatives of Beatty Development Group, the Maryland Department of the Environment and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are expected to be on hand to answer individuals' questions, though there will be no formal presentations or public forum on the controversial project.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
The developer planning to build an office tower at Harbor Point agreed Wednesday night to hold another public meeting on the controversial project after Fells Point residents who showed up for an open house there demanded a more formal discussion of the safety of developing the former chemical plant site. Councilman James B. Kraft, who represents Fells Point and who also attended the open house, pressed for the meeting after saying he wanted to give his constituents an opportunity to have their questions answered about precautions planned for keeping contaminated soil and ground water from being released by the project.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,Special to The Sun | April 11, 1995
Just about any time you try to get something for nothing, you're likely to be taken for a ride. Nowhere is that more certain than in the world of vitamin and mineral supplementation, especially when you're talking about stress relief or sports performance.It's true that "stress" will increase vitamin and mineral needs. But that's physiological stress, like being burned over half your body. Emotional stress has never been shown to increase nutritional needs. So taking a "stress relief" vitamin is no more useful than taking a standard multivitamin tablet that meets 100 percent of the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA)
NEWS
September 5, 2013
I can't believe developer Marco Greenberg's quote in reference to the former Allied Chemical site and the potential hazards of building on top of capped chromium that "it's actually safer to build here than virtually anywhere else in the city" ( "Harbor Point project stirs environmental concerns," Aug. 31). It is insulting but so typical of greedy developers who will say anything to get their way. All they really see and care about are dollar signs, and they will tell the "stupid" public whatever they think will serve their interest.
NEWS
September 5, 2013
I can't believe developer Marco Greenberg's quote in reference to the former Allied Chemical site and the potential hazards of building on top of capped chromium that "it's actually safer to build here than virtually anywhere else in the city" ( "Harbor Point project stirs environmental concerns," Aug. 31). It is insulting but so typical of greedy developers who will say anything to get their way. All they really see and care about are dollar signs, and they will tell the "stupid" public whatever they think will serve their interest.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2013
While the Harbor Point project's millions in public financing have dominated debate in Baltimore this summer, a carcinogen buried beneath the proposed waterfront development has sparked concerns about the safety of neighboring residents and the people who will work at the site in Fells Point. Environmental regulators who oversaw the cleanup of the former chromium plant there 20 years ago have given preliminary approval to build a 22-story tower on the 27-acre peninsula on the Inner Harbor.
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