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April 18, 2012
It's long been known that one surefire way to draw a crowd in Harford County is to hold a vintage car and hot rod rally and show. Saturday was no exception. Under bright blue skies, scores of beautiful cars and hundreds of people converged on Jarrett's Field in Jarrettsville for Romancing the Chrome, a show put together by the Harford County Public Library and the Jarrettsville Lions Club. The show was organized to help promote the exhibit "Cars: A Harford County Love Affair" that opened April 12 at the Jarrettsville library and runs through May 19. The show also provided a perfect prelude to the annual Night Out at the Jarrettsville Library that evening which featured an appearance by Earl Swift, author of "The Big Roads," a history of the interstate highway system.
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SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
After a weekend of calling fellow horse owners "cowards" and "cheaters" for running fresh entrants in the Belmont Stakes, California Chrome co-owner Steve Coburn said Monday that he needed to apologize "to the world," including the connections of winner Tonalist. Appearing on "Good Morning America" with his wife, Carolyn, Coburn told host Robin Roberts that "I'm very ashamed of myself. " California Chrome was trying to become the 12 th Triple Crown winner in Saturday's Belmont, but he finished tied for fourth . Tonalist, a horse who skipped the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes because he spiked a fever before the Derby, won a close race over Commissioner, another horse who didn't run in the first two legs of the Triple Crown.
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NEWS
May 20, 1992
The acreage around the former chrome plant at the Inner Harbor should be developed, in the opinion of 120 of 185 callers to SUNDIAL (64 percent). The other 65 (35 percent) say it should not be developed.Similarly, 117 of 183 callers (63 percent) say the site should be developed with appropriate health warnings, but 66 callers (36 percent) say it should not be developed even with such warnings.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - As California Chrome began his recovery from a foot injury that might have contributed to his flat performance in the Belmont Stakes, his co-owner, Steve Coburn, stood by harsh comments about owners and trainers who run fresh horses in the third leg of the Triple Crown. An unrepentant Coburn said the Belmont, which pitted numerous fresh horses against a tired California Chrome, was "like me, at 6-foot-2, playing basketball with a kid in a wheelchair. " Coburn had become one of the stars of California Chrome's Triple Crown quest with his bold predictions of victory and his talk of representing the little guy in a sport full of blue bloods.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 30, 2008
Shortly after Google Inc. unveiled Chrome, Chief Executive Eric Schmidt said the new Web browser "represents some of the best Google can do." He encouraged everyone to try it. But not many people are. Chrome gained market share within the first 24 hours of its release Sept. 2, but since then, it has given back much of those small gains to the leaders, Microsoft Corp.'s Internet Explorer and Mozilla's Firefox. That's according to Vince Vizzaccaro, executive vice president of marketing and strategic alliances at Internet measurement firm Net Applications.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | March 23, 1993
The owner of one of the last undeveloped parcels along Baltimore's downtown waterfront moved closer yesterday to making it a vibrant link between the Inner Harbor and Fells Point.Representatives of Allied Signal Inc. joined with Baltimore City Council members and neighborhood leaders to introduce legislation that would allow the company's former chrome processing plant to be transformed into a waterfront community."We've reached a significant milestone in . . . introducing ordinances that will enable development of this site," said Allied Signal senior project manager William R. Blank.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | June 6, 2006
Attorney Peter Angelos said yesterday that Maryland should compel Honeywell International to clean up more than a half-dozen chrome waste dumps around Baltimore's harbor - and said he's willing to fight a legal battle to force the issue. Angelos, who built a reputation with asbestos and tobacco litigation, is representing the community group Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development (BUILD) in an attempt to require the New Jersey-based manufacturing company to remove chromium beneath the Dundalk Marine Terminal and elsewhere.
NEWS
By Phillip Davis | January 29, 1991
The massive five-year effort to demolish the chrome-contaminated Allied-Signal plant is about 40 percent completed, officials said last night, but added that they still had no plans for the Inner Harbor site.That admission disappointed some of the 40 or so people who filled the community room of Lemko House on South Ann Street for the company's presentation."They have to make a decision before they cap the site, so to say that they have no plans now is a bit disingenuous," said Steve Bunker, of the local Waterfront Coalition of community groups.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | July 19, 1992
When Martha Pawliske-Herman asked about the lime-green liquid flowing from a huge storm drain at Dundalk Marine Terminal two years ago, state officials at first told her it was algae in the water or a chemical used to test for pollution.Only after repeated telephone calls did the East Baltimore woman learn the truth.Ground water and storm water running into the Patapsco River from the state-owned port property is laced with chromium, a toxic metal that can cause skin rashes and sores on contact and lung cancer if inhaled.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | September 20, 1992
Allied-Signal Inc., which is spending up to $100 million to clean its old chrome chemical works on Baltimore's waterfront, is lobbying regulators to relax rules on how much contaminated dirt must be removed from the site.No decision has been announced. But a Maryland environmental official says the soil cleanup requirement is likely to be eased, despite objections from environmentalists and from New Jersey officials, who have been dueling with Allied over cleaning up contaminated sites in that state.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
The owners of California Chrome might have had to face the world after the colt fell short of a Triple Crown victory Saturday, but Tim McCoig faced an even tougher crowd after the loss: his wife. "It's not a good day in my household. I just lost a week's paycheck," the Owings Mills resident said just moments after the Belmont Stakes favorite, who could have become the first Triple Crown winner in 36 years, finished tied for fourth. McCoig was among the group of people who gathered at Pimlico Race Course on Saturday in hopes of watching California Chrome continue his gallop into history.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - In the end, California Chrome could not outrun recent history. All week, veteran horsemen had pointed to the 11/2-mile oval at Belmont Park, the longest in American thoroughbred racing, and predicted it would be the grueling expanse on which his Triple Crown quest withered. They had seen it too many times, brilliantly fast horses losing their juice down the stretch of the Belmont Stakes. Surely this son of a sluggish filly and an unremarkable stallion would falter, just as Big Brown and Smarty Jones and Silver Charm had in the 36 years before him. It wasn't the result most in racing wanted, but the skeptics' logic held.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - Let the debate go on. California Chrome just didn't have enough left on a beautiful Saturday afternoon here on Long Island, finishing in a dead heat for fourth place in the Belmont Stakes and disappointing a nation full of horse racing enthusiasts and casual sports fans who have waited nearly four decades for a horse to win the Triple Crown. The skeptics were right. The race was won by Tonalist, a horse who didn't run in either the Kentucky Derby or the Preakness.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | June 7, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - California Chrome co-owner Steve Coburn spent the past five weeks captivating America with his folksy charm and a shoot-from-the-hip style that seemed refreshing until he shot himself in the foot on Saturday. Instead of expressing his great pride in a low-budget horse that captured the imagination of the nation and nearly became the first horse in 36 years to win horse racing's Triple Crown, Coburn blasted the format that forced his horse to face several Kentucky Derby rivals who rested through the Preakness and crowned a new Belmont Stakes champion who had not run since May 10. He called the strategy "a coward's way out" during a nationally televised interview that wasn't folksy or charming.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - There's an old saying in horse racing that all men are equal on the turf and under it. Put another way, this sport confounds sheiks and scions of American dynasties who drop millions of dollars in futile efforts to breed a Kentucky Derby winner. Meanwhile, two neophytes can spend $10,000 to breed a horse for the first time and come within a whisker of the Triple Crown. That's California Chrome's story as he prepares to chase racing's signature achievement in Saturday's Belmont Stakes.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | June 6, 2014
The case can be made that there is a lot more riding on California Chrome than a 100-pound jockey and a chance to be mentioned in the same conversation with the greatest thoroughbreds of all time. The case can be made that when Chrome bursts out of the starting gate at Belmont Park on Saturday, he'll be carrying the weight of the horse racing world on his chestnut shoulders. He won't just be chasing history. He won't just be trying to end a 36-year Triple Crown drought, though that's the main headline.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1996
A little-known Baltimore Quaker geologist, whose passion for some greenish-black rocks off the Falls Road enabled him to become the founder of the American chromium industry, is being inducted into the National Mining Hall of Fame tomorrow. The belated honors go to Isaac Tyson Jr., whose bronze plaque calls him the "Renaissance man of the early U.S. minerals and chemical industries.""The mining industry is so dominated by the West, it is unusual for an Easterner to get some recognition," said Harald B. (Johnny)
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | December 2, 1992
There were few mourners present when one of the harbor' oldest landmarks dropped out of sight this fall.The Block Street chemical works of Allied Chemical was a relic of an industrial Baltimore ruled by factory whistles calling people to work at 7 a.m.The huge metal-sided plant, once the center of a thriving chrome trade, was taken apart beam by beam, wall by wall. Nearly 150 years of chrome discharges had made the place an environmental hazard. The demolition was executed very carefully so that aged chrome dust was not sent across the harbor.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - For months now, California Chrome has carried the outlandish dreams of his little-guy owners and his unsung trainer every time he's roared around another racetrack. As his victories have mounted, so has his cargo. When he enters the starting gate for Saturday's Belmont Stakes, the dashing chestnut colt will carry the dreams of every thoroughbred racing enthusiast yearning to see the first Triple Crown winner since 1978. It would be great for the sport, they say. And it's hard to argue against the value of a transcendent hero to offset years of drug scandals, declining crowds and fractured governance.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - Robert Evans laughed when asked if Tonalist, his Belmont Stakes contender, has been a pleasant surprise. "Anytime you have a horse good enough to run in one of these races, it's a pleasant surprise," said Evans, who owns a 500-acre farm in Easton. He would know. This is his first Triple Crown entrant in almost 50 years as a thoroughbred owner and breeder. On the other hand, his father, Thomas Mellon Evans , owned Pleasant Colony, winner of the 1981 Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes.
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