Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChristopher Walken
IN THE NEWS

Christopher Walken

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Gene Seymour and Gene Seymour,Newsday | August 29, 2007
So now it would seem, from watching Balls of Fury, that Christopher Walken has joined the legion of stand-up comics, student actors and bar-stool mimics trolling for laughs by doing bad Christopher Walken impressions. This isn't necessarily a complaint. If anyone's earned the right to pan-fry his image, it's Walken. Even when hip-deep in the throes of broad self-parody, Walken almost justifies the existence of a fumble-footed knockoff like Balls of Fury. He plays Feng, a villainous outlaw table-tennis kingpin who dresses like Fu Manchu and talks like somebody doing a bad impression of ... well, we don't have to pound it into the floorboards, do we?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | July 13, 2008
It's a great month to escape the Maryland heat at the movies. But real life can be far more entertaining than anything Hollywood screenwriters could dream up. So grab a glass of sun tea and enjoy the First Annual Janet's World Top Ten Summer Screenplay Ideas, or, as it is breezily known, FAJWTTSSI. After reading, I think you'll agree that I should definitely make an appointment with a major studio mogul and pitch these ideas immediately. In the trash, perhaps. * It's an airline industry retrospective, taking us back to the exciting days when airports were populated with smartly dressed people hefting voluminous molded plastic suitcases sans wheels.
Advertisement
FEATURES
November 20, 1999
Sometimes, even in the world of network television, quality is appreciated."Sarah, Plain & Tall," that splendid turn-of-the-century story of heartland Americana starring Glenn Close and Christopher Walken, set ratings records when it premiered in 1991, becoming the most-watched Hallmark Hall of Fame presentation in the franchise's then 42-year history. With its audience of 50 million viewers, it remains the highest-rated made-for-TV movie of the decade.And, now, comes "Sarah, Plain & Tall: Winter's End," the last of three CBS films based on the Newbery Award-winning work of Patricia MacLachlan.
FEATURES
December 21, 2007
Taking a page from Pennies From Heaven, the family and neighbors of Romance & Cigarettes' Nick Murder (James Gandolfini) act out by singing along to kitschy hits, such as Engelbert Humperdinck's "A Man Without Love." It's karaoke with a vengeance as Murder, a Queens, N.Y., construction worker, takes refuge from a dead marriage in the arms of an underwear shop clerk (Kate Winslet, ferreting humanity out of a crass other-woman stereotype). His wife (Susan Sarandon) and his daughters (Mary-Louise Parker, Mandy Moore, Aida Turturro)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 13, 2006
Barry Levinson's Man of the Year is being sold as Jon Stewart Goes to Washington. But beneath the marketing of Robin Williams as a Stewart-like comedian running for president is a piquant comedy-drama without a prefab element in it. From the moment you see and hear Christopher Walken as the comic's manager, Jack Menken, telling the tale from a wheelchair, you know it's not your ordinary stand-up-does-good story. Head of State (2003) starred Chris Rock as a D.C. alderman who becomes the Democratic presidential candidate, but whatever laughs it had came from an audience's affection for Rock, and the fictional construct only diluted his essence.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 23, 2006
Click continues the fascinating process of watching Adam Sandler mature onscreen. The frat-boy humor remains, but as in 2004's 50 First Dates, it's leavened by honest heart, compelling inventiveness and the acknowledgment that not everything in life exists to be snickered at. Sandler plays Michael Newman, a successful architect whose drive and ambition leave no time for his family. They also leave him with no time to master his household's plethora of remotes, that bewildering pile of advanced technology that is the bane of family rooms everywhere.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | August 30, 1997
Alicia Silverstone may not be old enough to sip a beer legally, but that doesn't mean she can't be a Hollywood producer. That's what comes from becoming an international movie star at around the same time you qualify for a driver's license. Big-time studios are willing to hurl money at you to make sure you stay happy and keep appearing in their movies.So, good for Alicia.And bad for us.Bad for us because "Excess Baggage," the maiden ship for Silverstone's First Kiss Productions, is full of leaks.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 14, 1997
Zany, wacky, goofy and even pretty darn nutty, here comes "Touch," which refers not to low-impact football but to the finger of the Almighty.Derived from an Elmore Leonard novel by Paul ("Taxi Driver") Schrader and starring Christopher Walken, the movie carries with it expectations that everybody is only too happy to smash to pieces. No, darn it, it's not a sleazy, violent, tensely plotted, quirky tale of small-beer crooks and cops, as one might expect from the magic teaming of the Leonard, Schrader and Walken sensibilities.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 13, 1996
One of the many, many things we film scribblers will have to answer for when we go before the Big Critic in the Sky is the ruination of Abel Ferrara. Once upon a time, he was a good solid exploitation filmmaker, with such sensational atrocities to his credit as "Ms. .45" and "The King of New York."Then, with "The Bad Lieutenant," he was discovered by the literati and the A guys started writing exegesis rather than reviews. Instead of saying, "It hits with the ramrod slam of a red hot fireplace poker!"
FEATURES
By Gene Seymour and Gene Seymour,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 26, 2002
If you've been to Disney World, you've probably discovered how useful that "Country Bear Jamboree" of singing automated bears can be when you're trying to cool down youngsters overstimulated by thrill rides. Still, no matter how cute those big, furry fellows are, they're at best an appetizer compared to the other attractions. So why in Mickey's name would anyone make The Country Bears? Although it's a blatant rip-off of The Blues Brothers, the idea of making the beasts into a 1970s-style country-rock band broken up by too much time on the road isn't a bad one. The opening montage of faded concert footage, faux Billboard and Rolling Stone clips and sound bites from Willie Nelson is winsome and clever enough.
FEATURES
By Gene Seymour and Gene Seymour,Newsday | August 29, 2007
So now it would seem, from watching Balls of Fury, that Christopher Walken has joined the legion of stand-up comics, student actors and bar-stool mimics trolling for laughs by doing bad Christopher Walken impressions. This isn't necessarily a complaint. If anyone's earned the right to pan-fry his image, it's Walken. Even when hip-deep in the throes of broad self-parody, Walken almost justifies the existence of a fumble-footed knockoff like Balls of Fury. He plays Feng, a villainous outlaw table-tennis kingpin who dresses like Fu Manchu and talks like somebody doing a bad impression of ... well, we don't have to pound it into the floorboards, do we?
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 13, 2006
Barry Levinson's Man of the Year is being sold as Jon Stewart Goes to Washington. But beneath the marketing of Robin Williams as a Stewart-like comedian running for president is a piquant comedy-drama without a prefab element in it. From the moment you see and hear Christopher Walken as the comic's manager, Jack Menken, telling the tale from a wheelchair, you know it's not your ordinary stand-up-does-good story. Head of State (2003) starred Chris Rock as a D.C. alderman who becomes the Democratic presidential candidate, but whatever laughs it had came from an audience's affection for Rock, and the fictional construct only diluted his essence.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 23, 2006
Click continues the fascinating process of watching Adam Sandler mature onscreen. The frat-boy humor remains, but as in 2004's 50 First Dates, it's leavened by honest heart, compelling inventiveness and the acknowledgment that not everything in life exists to be snickered at. Sandler plays Michael Newman, a successful architect whose drive and ambition leave no time for his family. They also leave him with no time to master his household's plethora of remotes, that bewildering pile of advanced technology that is the bane of family rooms everywhere.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 14, 2005
The conflict between a woman's inner good girl and inner bad girl is a great movie subject. Unfortunately, it remains untapped in Domino, the "inspired-by-fact" story of a ferocious female bounty hunter who in the end displays a heart of tarnished gold. Domino (Keira Knightley), the daughter of a British movie star, Laurence Harvey (Room at the Top, The Manchurian Candidate), and a London model (played by Jacqueline Bisset), chucks pampering and privilege to grab fugitives and bail-jumpers off the mean streets and out of the crummy motels and trailer parks of the American West.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 15, 2005
Though it's a relative quiet week for new releases - Crash and the first season of Lost are the big news - there are so many vintage films coming out on DVD that the cineaste may go blurry-eyed with the treasure trove of horror classics, film noirs, dramas, comedies and even animated films to savor. Universal's Legacy Series ($27 each) features disc sets of three Academy Award-winners: To Kill a Mockingbird (1962); The Sting (1973) and The Deer Hunter (1978). Mockingbird, which stars Gregory Peck in his Oscar-winning role as the compassionate Southern lawyer Atticus Finch, features an artistic "making of" documentary; Peck's Oscar and AFI Life Achievement Award acceptance speeches; "A Conversation With Gregory Peck," an engaging documentary directed by his daughter Cecilia Peck and Barbara Kopple; and commentary with director Robert Mulligan and the late producer Alan J. Pakula.
NEWS
By Chris Yakaitis and Chris Yakaitis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 2005
Sharon Bubel, a tourist from Atlanta, stands at the helm of the schooner Woodwind II as it glides from Annapolis Harbor into the Chesapeake Bay on a breezy Wednesday afternoon. As Bubel delicately grips the wheel, Woodwind II crew member Micah Sauntry offers guidance at her side. "Spin to the right," he says. Crew member Tiffany Talsma adds: "Like in the movies!" Like Christopher Walken. Last year, the actor stood at that very helm, shooting scenes along the Chesapeake for the summer comedy Wedding Crashers, which opens today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Lowman and Rob Lowman,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | May 15, 2003
Major directors don't usually put out two films in a year, let alone two very good ones. Last summer, Steven Spielberg released the sci-fi adventure think piece Minority Report and followed it up in December with the true-life caper Catch Me If You Can, now out on DVD. The story of Frank W. Abagnale Jr. (played with panache by Leonardo DiCaprio), who as a teen-ager in the 1960s successfully impersonated an airline pilot (no, he didn't fly), a doctor (no, he didn't operate) and a lawyer, is a breezy reflection of the era, when anything seemed possible.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | July 13, 2008
It's a great month to escape the Maryland heat at the movies. But real life can be far more entertaining than anything Hollywood screenwriters could dream up. So grab a glass of sun tea and enjoy the First Annual Janet's World Top Ten Summer Screenplay Ideas, or, as it is breezily known, FAJWTTSSI. After reading, I think you'll agree that I should definitely make an appointment with a major studio mogul and pitch these ideas immediately. In the trash, perhaps. * It's an airline industry retrospective, taking us back to the exciting days when airports were populated with smartly dressed people hefting voluminous molded plastic suitcases sans wheels.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn Lovell and Glenn Lovell,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 17, 2004
SAN FRANCISCO - Christopher Walken works a lot. As best he can figure, he has made "about a hundred movies" since appearing in Annie Hall and The Deer Hunter in the late '70s. That's an astounding number, given that the average Hollywood star makes one film, possibly two, every 18 months or so. "Work? It's my favorite thing to do, and I don't really have anything else that I do," says Walken, 61, during a stopover to talk up Around the Bend, an oddball reunion picture in which, for the first time, he plays a grandfather - with an unsavory past, of course.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 12, 2004
Guys can be great. But sometimes there's no one more "simpatico" than a good girlfriend. And good girlfriends can be hard to come by. Even our favorite bunch of girlfriends is about to desert us when HBO's Sex and the City ends in a week and a half. Walker Hayes to the rescue! This 24-year-old Carroll County native returned to B'more a year ago, after a few years in the Big Apple, and found a dearth of girlfriends. All her old school friends were now living elsewhere. "Unless you work in a place with lots of other women, it's really difficult to meet potential friends," Walker notes.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.