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Christopher Robin

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NEWS
April 25, 1996
THE HUMAN WHO was Christopher Robin died this month, but the real Christopher Robin will live forever in the Hundred-Acre Wood, playing with and consoling Winnie the Pooh and his other animal friends, as long as there are children to sit on a parent's knee and listen in wonder.The wide-eyed, mop-haired son of British author A. A. Milne inspired the beloved tales about Pooh and Piglet, Eeyore and Tigger and their young companion 70 years ago. They remain enduring children's classics, revitalized for later generations by films of Walt Disney.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Rosenthal | May 17, 2012
If you're in the market for a home with a literary heritage -- and have a few million dollars to spend -- check out this English estate that once was the home of Christopher Milne (1920-96), who was immortalized in the Winnie the Pooh books. The listing for 9.5-acre Cotchford Farm notes that the house was bought by A.A Milne in 1925 as a country retreat for himself, his wife and son, Christopher Robin. "It was here, amidst the beautiful Sussex countryside and surrounding woodland where the wonderful stories of Christopher Robin and Winnie-the-Pooh came to life, now world famous childhood classics.
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FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1996
Christopher Robin Milne was an author's character who searched during most of his years for his own real life. He found it about 14 years before his death, which occurred last week in England.Resolution came with the publication in 1982 of the final volume of his autobiography, "The Hollow on the Hill." Only after that was he able to separate what was his, and real, from what belonged to the fiction of his father. Only then was he able to reconcile his own life with the one he never lived, though much of the world seemed to think he had.His two lives criss-crossed and confused him. He often had difficulty remembering what he had actually done himself -- separating that from what had been done by his fictional counterpart, the Christopher Robin created by A. A. Milne in the Winnie-the-Pooh stories.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | October 18, 2001
This past Sunday, Winnie the Pooh -- the fictional yellow bear who's inspired such philosophical texts as The Tao of Pooh, Pooh and the Philosophers and Postmodern Pooh -- turned 75. The Havre de Grace Branch Library is celebrating with a belated birthday bash Monday, featuring games, stories and treats. Now most of us know a thing or two about Pooh: He eats "hunny" by the fistful; he hangs out with a miniature pig, a bouncing tiger and a donkey; and he possesses a rather irrational fear of imaginary "Woozles," "Heffalumps" and "Jagulars."
NEWS
April 22, 1996
Christopher Robin Milne, 'Winnie the Pooh' friend, 75Christopher Robin Milne, 75, immortalized as the young friend of Winnie the Pooh in the children's stories by his father, A. A. Milne, has died, the Times of London reported today.The newspaper said Christopher Robin Milne died Saturday but did not say where or give the cause.He was born in London in 1920 and was known as an adult to resent the melding of his childhood and the fictional one in his father's tales.In 1924, Alan Alexander Milne, already well-known for his light hand at literature, published a book of verse inspired by his 4-year-old son, "When We Were Very Young."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Rosenthal | May 17, 2012
If you're in the market for a home with a literary heritage -- and have a few million dollars to spend -- check out this English estate that once was the home of Christopher Milne (1920-96), who was immortalized in the Winnie the Pooh books. The listing for 9.5-acre Cotchford Farm notes that the house was bought by A.A Milne in 1925 as a country retreat for himself, his wife and son, Christopher Robin. "It was here, amidst the beautiful Sussex countryside and surrounding woodland where the wonderful stories of Christopher Robin and Winnie-the-Pooh came to life, now world famous childhood classics.
FEATURES
By Randi Kest | December 23, 1998
A.A. Milne is most famous for the creation of the Winnie the Pooh and Christopher Robin family of characters.Born in 1882, Milne lived in England, where he attended Cambridge and became the editor of the school paper. Winnie-the-Pooh and company were not created until after Milne graduated, moved back to London and dabbled in newspapers, magazines and writing plays - excelling at all.With the birth of his son, Christopher Robin Milne, in August 1920, Milne began writing verse for children.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | October 18, 2001
This past Sunday, Winnie the Pooh -- the fictional yellow bear who's inspired such philosophical texts as The Tao of Pooh, Pooh and the Philosophers and Postmodern Pooh -- turned 75. The Havre de Grace Branch Library is celebrating with a belated birthday bash Monday, featuring games, stories and treats. Now most of us know a thing or two about Pooh: He eats "hunny" by the fistful; he hangs out with a miniature pig, a bouncing tiger and a donkey; and he possesses a rather irrational fear of imaginary "Woozles," "Heffalumps" and "Jagulars."
FEATURES
By A.A. Milne | June 14, 1998
'Sneezles'Christopher Robin had wheezlesAnd sneezles,They bundled himIntoHis bed.They gave him what goesWith a cold in the nose,And some more for a coldIn the head.They wonderedIf wheezlesCould turnInto measles,If sneezlesWould turnInto mumps;They examined his chestFor a rash,And the restOf his body for swellings and lumps.They sent for some doctorsIn sneezlesAnd wheezlesTo tell them what oughtTo be done.All sorts and conditionsOf famous physiciansCame hurrying roundAt a run.They all made a noteOf the state of his throat,They asked if he suffered from thirst;They asked if the sneezlesCame after the wheezles,Or if the first sneezleCame first.
NEWS
By Linda Liggett Meyer | November 26, 1990
A.A. MILNE: The Man Behind Winnie-the Pooh. Written by Ann Thwaite. Random House. 553 pages. $29.95. IN A.A. Milne's "The House at Pooh Corner," Rabbit thinks that Christopher Robin "respects Owl, because you can't help respecting anybody who can spell TUESDAY, even if he doesn't spell it right." The same could be said of Ann Thwaite's new biography of Milne. Her efforts are to be respected even if she doesn't get it right.Thwaite's book is long on facts and short on interpretation. Her obviously painstaking research has produced a hefty volume chock full of unnecessary detail and trivia.
FEATURES
By Randi Kest | December 23, 1998
A.A. Milne is most famous for the creation of the Winnie the Pooh and Christopher Robin family of characters.Born in 1882, Milne lived in England, where he attended Cambridge and became the editor of the school paper. Winnie-the-Pooh and company were not created until after Milne graduated, moved back to London and dabbled in newspapers, magazines and writing plays - excelling at all.With the birth of his son, Christopher Robin Milne, in August 1920, Milne began writing verse for children.
FEATURES
By A.A. Milne | June 14, 1998
'Sneezles'Christopher Robin had wheezlesAnd sneezles,They bundled himIntoHis bed.They gave him what goesWith a cold in the nose,And some more for a coldIn the head.They wonderedIf wheezlesCould turnInto measles,If sneezlesWould turnInto mumps;They examined his chestFor a rash,And the restOf his body for swellings and lumps.They sent for some doctorsIn sneezlesAnd wheezlesTo tell them what oughtTo be done.All sorts and conditionsOf famous physiciansCame hurrying roundAt a run.They all made a noteOf the state of his throat,They asked if he suffered from thirst;They asked if the sneezlesCame after the wheezles,Or if the first sneezleCame first.
NEWS
April 25, 1996
THE HUMAN WHO was Christopher Robin died this month, but the real Christopher Robin will live forever in the Hundred-Acre Wood, playing with and consoling Winnie the Pooh and his other animal friends, as long as there are children to sit on a parent's knee and listen in wonder.The wide-eyed, mop-haired son of British author A. A. Milne inspired the beloved tales about Pooh and Piglet, Eeyore and Tigger and their young companion 70 years ago. They remain enduring children's classics, revitalized for later generations by films of Walt Disney.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1996
Christopher Robin Milne was an author's character who searched during most of his years for his own real life. He found it about 14 years before his death, which occurred last week in England.Resolution came with the publication in 1982 of the final volume of his autobiography, "The Hollow on the Hill." Only after that was he able to separate what was his, and real, from what belonged to the fiction of his father. Only then was he able to reconcile his own life with the one he never lived, though much of the world seemed to think he had.His two lives criss-crossed and confused him. He often had difficulty remembering what he had actually done himself -- separating that from what had been done by his fictional counterpart, the Christopher Robin created by A. A. Milne in the Winnie-the-Pooh stories.
NEWS
April 22, 1996
Christopher Robin Milne, 'Winnie the Pooh' friend, 75Christopher Robin Milne, 75, immortalized as the young friend of Winnie the Pooh in the children's stories by his father, A. A. Milne, has died, the Times of London reported today.The newspaper said Christopher Robin Milne died Saturday but did not say where or give the cause.He was born in London in 1920 and was known as an adult to resent the melding of his childhood and the fictional one in his father's tales.In 1924, Alan Alexander Milne, already well-known for his light hand at literature, published a book of verse inspired by his 4-year-old son, "When We Were Very Young."
NEWS
By Linda Liggett Meyer | November 26, 1990
A.A. MILNE: The Man Behind Winnie-the Pooh. Written by Ann Thwaite. Random House. 553 pages. $29.95. IN A.A. Milne's "The House at Pooh Corner," Rabbit thinks that Christopher Robin "respects Owl, because you can't help respecting anybody who can spell TUESDAY, even if he doesn't spell it right." The same could be said of Ann Thwaite's new biography of Milne. Her efforts are to be respected even if she doesn't get it right.Thwaite's book is long on facts and short on interpretation. Her obviously painstaking research has produced a hefty volume chock full of unnecessary detail and trivia.
NEWS
April 16, 2006
On April 15, 2006, JAMES; beloved husband of the late Katherine Tselepis; devoted father of John and his wife Sharon Tselepis and Mary Tselepis; loving grandfather of Christopher, Robin and Jamie Tselepis; dear brother of Steve, Aristotle, Mary, George and Angie Tselepis. Also survived by nieces and nephews. Friends may call at the family owned Evans Chapel of Memories - Parkville, on Tuesday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Trishagion Service will be held at 4 P.M. James will lie instate at the Greek Orthodox Cathedral of the Annunciation on Wednesday 11:30 A.M. to 12 noon, at which time funeral services will be held.
NEWS
October 5, 2003
On October 2, 2003, THOMAS D. BOLITA, loving husband of Susan Noonan; devoted father of Christopher Bolita, Robin Daugherty, Daniel Bolita; loving stepfather of Denise, Rosalind, Laurence, Maureen, and Jack; dear brother of James Bolita. Also survived by step grandchildren: Matthew, Emily, Carly, Christian, Alex, Elizabeth, Victor and Jack. Celebration of his life on Tuesday, October 14, 6:30 to 9 P.M., at the Museum of Industry, Key Highway. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Friends of Patterson Park, 27 S. Patterson Park Ave., Baltimore, MD 21231 or Downtown Sailing Ctr.
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